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Which company did special effects for JURASSIC PARK movie?

posted by jambohone on - last edited - Viewed by 704 users

is it SILICON GRAPHICS, APPLE OR IBM OR NONE OF THESE? IF NONE OF THESE SPECIFY THE ANS. POINTS FOR SURE..............

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  • Fascinating stuff, Laserschwert! And yes, I wish they did that today. I imagine that's why no movie has been able to top Jurassic Park in terms of how realistic the dinosaurs seems and act.

  • @Elvenmonk said: Eh, computer companies and game companies do special effects from time to time. Ubisoft does special effects for movies.



    I've never heard that. What movies?

  • @Laserschwert said: And that's supposed to be a hard question? :-P

    Weeeell:
    Since Phil Tippett got onboard the project, although the requirement for his go-motion dinosaurs got basically killed by the fact, that Spielberg was more convinced by ILM's first CGI-tests, Phil stayed on the project as animation supervisor. His expertise in the field of stop-motion animation (plus the animal behaviour he's studied during early pre-production on JP) was used to not only teach ILM's animators (who never really did something as life-like as the JP-dinos) the principles of animation, he also helped develop the DID ("digital input device"... jokingly named "dinosaur input device" for JP). The DID basically represented a stop-motion armature with sensors at the joints, which allowed Tippett Studios' animators using their knowledge to animate in the computer. Four DIDs were build - two T-Rexes and two Raptors. All of the other digital dinosaurs were animated without a DID though.




    You sir win a gold star for today, now bonus if you can guess what line phil tippet said to spielberg, that was put into the movie.

  • @Icedhope said: You sir win a gold star for today, now bonus if you can guess what line phil tippet said to spielberg, that was put into the movie.



    Grant: We're out of job.
    Malcom: Don't you mean extinct?


    Or was that one suggested by someone else? I remember someone said it and Spielberg loved it...

  • Yep, Trenchfoot beat me to it.

    "I think I'm extinct.", at least according to the making of.

    From a recent interview with Cinefex:

    With the T-rex test, ILM had gone a long way toward rendering a monster; and it convinced Spielberg that all the non-practical dinosaur shots could be done through computer animation. Stop- and go-motion techniques - and, presumably Tippett Studio - were out. "That was a really excruciating moment," recalled Jules Roman. "We knew that ILM was exploring computer graphics, of course, and we knew it was coming along; but we had no idea it was moving along to the point where they could use it for the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park. But they produced this T-rex test and that was it. It was [ILM's] poor Dennis [Muren] who had to make the call to Phil; and Phil's immediate response was: "Well, that's it then. I'm a dinosaur."

    "My first reaction," Tippett affirmed, "was: 'Fine, I guess I'll just go off and die. Screw you guys.' And then I got really sick. I contracted pneumonia, and my doctor said: 'You have two choices - either you go into the hospital, or you go home and go to bed for three weeks.' So I went to bed. It was just a total physical and emotional implosion."

    BTW, Jules Roman is the co-founder of Tippett Studio, alongside Phil Tippett, of course.

    @Crispy Onion said: I wish the DID's would be used today, or even if they just could do some research on living animals.

    Today, whenever you see ILM animating something in a Making-Of they're just stupidly smirking and telling everyone how easy this stuff is.
    You make it sound like no studio does research anymore. To me WETA is the new ILM, and just look at what amazing animation they did on "King Kong".

    I just think that most movies today are focusing less on "animals" and more on "monsters" nowadays, something that "Jurassic Park" deliberately wanted to avoid. And as always you have to consider that JP featured only around 10 minutes of CG dinosaurs, so years of research went into making these 10 minutes as believable as possible. Now, with CG being everyday's business, it would help to train new animators better. And still: The lack in quality of CG effects is - in my opinion - due to time and budget constrains. CG is now the "cheap" way to do it, while back then it was the "state of the art" way, which produced the most stunningly realistic results.

    What helped JP mostly though, isn't the use of the DID itself, but the fact that the DID allowed the best animators in the world (who didn't know anything about animating inside a computer) to animate those dinosaurs. As always: It's not the tools, it's the artists behind the tools.

  • You know, it feels good chatting with other JP fans. It really does!

  • it's nice to know there are still JP fans. For a while I thought the series was dead. But i can seen now that it's still alive and well.

  • @Laserschwert said: "I think I'm extinct.", at least according to the making of.

    From a recent interview with Cinefex:
    ....



    Which issue of Cinefex? I'd be interested in reading the rest of the interview.

    @Laserschwert said: Now, with CG being everyday's business, it would help to train new animators better. And still: The lack in quality of CG effects is - in my opinion - due to time and budget constrains. CG is now the "cheap" way to do it, while back then it was the "state of the art" way, which produced the most stunningly realistic results.

    I think your right, I've seen to many uses of CG that are simply shoddy and rushed. Plus it seems that they've forgotten that the best use is to augment reality in a believable way (ala JP) as opposed to doing things that your brain screams are just wrong.

    One of the many reasons I didn't like the modern Spiderman movies was, to my mind, the awful CG effects like when he's swinging between buildings.

    @Laserschwert said: What helped JP mostly though, isn't the use of the DID itself, but the fact that the DID allowed the best animators in the world (who didn't know anything about animating inside a computer) to animate those dinosaurs. As always: It's not the tools, it's the artists behind the tools.

    Exactly!

  • @Laserschwert said:
    You make it sound like no studio does research anymore. To me WETA is the new ILM, and just look at what amazing animation they did on "King Kong".



    Didn't Andy Serkis actually live with Gorillas in a Zoo for some time before production?
    Yeah, that was awesome! :D

  • @tarasis said: Which issue of Cinefex? I'd be interested in reading the rest of the interview.



    That would be #121. It's actually a whole article about him.

    Cinefex121.jpg

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