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Game too easy/ short/ lacks puzzles Thread

posted by joseppey on - last edited - Viewed by 4.2K users

How did the first episode compare in terms of difficulty to Telltale's other games?
(More specifically, the last Sam & Max season)

407 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Gman5852 said: Once again telltales easiest game.

    It seems telltale got everything the bttf fanbase wanted.
    And nothing the adventure gamers wanted.

    Couldn't have summed it up any better. I was actually just talking to my cousin down in Florida tonight about this game as we used to play all the old school adventure games when he would visit including all the Sierra and Lucasarts series. He was asking if it was any good and I told him the best way I could sum it up is that its an adventure game for people that hate adventure games. He said he would wait and maybe buy it if the latter episodes become more difficult.I told him not to hold his breath as obviously Telltale is seeing dollar signs with these new licenses. We might see a little bit of an increase but I dont think adventure gamers are going to see anywhere close to the game they want to see.

  • I don't really see the problem with the difficulty to be perfectly honest.
    Some of you are comparing BTTF to Sam and Max, but it's not perfectly fair.
    Sam and Max's puzzles (and Monkey Island's and Strong Bad's) tend to be fairly weird. You have to think outside the box to beat these games. Not with BTTF.
    BTTF's puzzles are more straightforward. They make more sense. And that's really because of the franchise.
    Sam and Max/Monkey Island/Strong Bad are "cartoony". BTTF is "realistic" (nothing to do with the artstyle, I'm talking about the universe). Therefore, the puzzles in BTTF are "realistic" and easier.

  • [quote]Therefore, the puzzles in BTTF are "realistic" and easier.[/quote]

    I respectfully disagree with this theory. In my opinion, puzzle difficulty is independent of how whacky the game plot is (provided the player has a base understanding of what's actually happening, story-wise, but that should be the case for most parts of any game, and if not you can still provide a goal-hint system; besides, if you think of it, the plot in BTTF *is* pretty whacky). In fact, good puzzles -- even in whacky games -- still should make sense, or we'll be frustrated because a) good stuff we try doesn't work and b) nonsensical stuff does work but we don't understand why.

    IMO the real problem with too-easy puzzles as sometimes presented by BTTF is that the solution is often the only choice there is, because there is a very limited amount of objects, because objects cannot be combined, because multiple choice discussions can often be simply easily clicked through, because there is a very limited map, and because object-receival time and object-use time are in short distance of each other (there may be more reasons).

    As an example of whacky plot with an obvious solution, take the babelfish in Douglas Adams Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: if you would have to pick up the babelfish and then put it in your ear, then that's a perfectly reasonable solution within the context of that whacky plot. So if the game would explain what a babelfish is -- "a thing you put in your ear which then translates for you" -- then it is not a hard puzzle (in fact, as whacky as putting a fish in your ear would be in real life, this wouldn't actually be a real puzzle because it would be too easy; probably, in a good adventure, there'd be some difficulty in even getting that fish).

    Now, when it comes to *plot linearity*, then I partly agree with you. If one tries to create what's basically a movie with a linear movie plot, then puzzle difficulty can greatly suffer from it, because the player cannot walk around a lot and may not pick up a lot of objects. If you think of a BTTF game as basically a movie when creating it, then it could actually hurt the game part of it.

  • It isn't about the sense of the puzzles as the lack of puzzles.

    The difficulty would drastically ramp up if there were just more items you could collect(not have to, just could) and more people you could try to interact with.

    This was like a hidden item game, where most of the items were removed before you started to play.

    So an "Obvious item game"

  • @JPhilipp said: besides, if you think of it, the plot in BTTF *is* pretty whacky).


    The plot ? Sure.
    I was talking more about the events and the situations.

    In fact, good puzzles -- even in whacky games -- still should make sense, or we'll be frustrated because a) good stuff we try doesn't work and b) nonsensical stuff does work but we don't understand why.

    Sure. I'm not denying that whacky games don't have good puzzles, just that it doesn't fit with the BTTF universe, imo, and thus makes the game easier and straightforward.

    IMO the real problem with too-easy puzzles as sometimes presented by BTTF is because there is a very limited amount of objects, because objects cannot be combined, because multiple choice discussions can often be simply easily clicked through,


    Fair enough.

    because there is a very limited map, and because object-receival time and object-use time are in short distance of each other (there may be more reasons).


    Both of those (the second being in direct relation with the first) can easily be explained by the fact that it's only the first episode and Telltale will expand on the map in later episodes (as they usually do).

  • @Rocnael said: Both of those (the second being in direct relation with the first) can easily be explained by the fact that it's only the first episode and Telltale will expand on the map in later episodes (as they usually do).

    And let's hope the difficulty will increase in future episodes. If that's the way TellTale is going about it -- an easy first episode with increasing level of difficulty for every episode, more objects and more rooms which you need to interact with non-linerarly -- it could be a good compromise for everyone (though they make things at least *a little* harder even for first episodes, to not put off fans). Is TellTale actually getting involved in the forum in the "too easy" discussion, what's their stance on this?

  • The feeling I got from this one is the same feeling I've got from a lot of Telltale's first runs in a new franchise. Initially their focus is to try to get the right tone (Which they NAILED, BTW!) and the puzzle complexity suffers a touch. Just remember Sam and Max 101, Bone 101, Wallace and Gromit 101, SBCG4AP 101 - All very easy, and all those series panned out OK by the end.

    On top of that, with the theme, it seems somewhat likely there will be some Back to the Future style running-around-while-avoiding-your-past-self, and perhaps they had to simplify it a touch to make sure we remember what our past self would be doing.

    I have no doubt that by Episode 3 (It's ALWAYS Episode 3 for me) I'll be completely obsessed. Then Episode 5 will come and go too soon, making me want more more more...

  • Dear Telltale,

    I bought BTTF Episode 1 on Steam a few days ago.

    It took me barely 1 hour to finish it.

    I spent £15 on it.

    That's more than I earn in 1 hour.

    I love BTTF and on paper this is a great idea, however it was stupidly easy, and money-wastingly short.

    I enjoyed the voice acting and the graphics are nice, but come on guys, where's the game?

    Based on this, I'm not sure I really want to blow another chunk of money on Season 2.

    For the first time in my life, I feel like I've been ripped by Telltale.

    Yours Disappointedly

  • You do realize that you've bought the whole season right? Even if every episode only takes you one hour to complete that's still £15 for 5 hours of game time.

  • @Pak-Man said: Just remember Sam and Max 101, Bone 101, Wallace and Gromit 101, SBCG4AP 101 - All very easy, and all those series panned out OK by the end.

    Actually, I think that all those games were harder than BTTF Ep1 (with the single exception of Bone Ep.1). :p
    I understand where they're coming from with this series, but they should really think twice before losing the trust of the core adventure gaming community.

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