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The Walking Dead

posted by Woodsyblue on - last edited - Viewed by 1.5K users

Seeing as it seems like the obvious front runner for Telltale's new mystery project I thought we should start a thread about The Walking Dead. Just a place where people can share their thoughts on the comic books/TV series and whether or not people think it has the potential for a good game.

I live in Australia where the show hasn't aired yet so I haven't seen it but one of my friends has a copy so I'm probably going to end up watching it some time in the next couple of weeks. I have been interested in seeing it for some time now, largely for the big part Frank Darabont played in production. I've never read any of the comics.

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  • Dashing is right on this .... reference Lucasarts mid and late 90's

  • @Rather Dashing said: If the "games that made them great" make far less money than the "games with big-name media licenses that people have actually heard of", you can bet your ass they won't go back to them.

    Last time I checked ToMI has been their most successful game thus far and it was the early success of Sam & Max seasons 1 and 2 brought them into the limelight. Not to mention that their biggest disappointment, sales-wise, was the licenced game Wallace & Gromit's Grand Adventures. So moving away form traditional adventure games forever hardly seems like a worrying issue.

    Fan's of adventure games like games like MI and S&M and at the end of the day Telltale make their money off Adventure game fans. We are their niche.

    Anyway, back on point I just watched the first episode of The Walking Dead with some of my friends and quite enjoyed it. It was very slow at points but never painfully so and there were most of the standard eye-rolling zombie movie cliches but the characters were interesting and there were some moments of great humor. I'm looking forward to watching the rest of the season.

  • LucasArts made tones of money off their adventures too. Secret of Monkey Island wasn't some niche game, it sold extremely well in its own market environment. Around the time of Grim Fandango, though, they found a revenue stream that produced far more dough. Grim Fandango wasn't even a failure, it sold relatively well, but the trade-off between doing something like that and doing Star Wars again was obvious: You get more money out of putting less work into a Star Wars game. So they did.

  • Interestingly Full Throttle was their biggest money making adventure game.... I think I read that in an interview with Tim Schafer... Yeah Lucasarts learned pretty fast that a game didnt even have to be all that good to sell if it had Star Wars on the box....

  • @Irishmile said: here is the first book on Image comics page.
    http://www.imagecomics.com/iconline....ver&resize=now

    and the page for the show on AMC
    http://www.amctv.com/originals/The-Walking-Dead/

    Motion Comic... I usually hate these but this one was done well.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riKsI6covPA

    and just because its has an awesome song by the eels
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ocZtE9U29w

    I had seen the first episode of the show before, and I thought it was pretty good. It was well acted, the writing was okay, and the human drama was really intense and believable. I just read the first issue of the comic from that link. Man, compared to the show, that was really terrible. There was none of the detail, emotion, or character development that the show had. It felt like a rough skeleton of a plot, like the artist was just rushing to get through the story as quickly as possible without stopping to develop and flesh anything out. The writing in the show was alright, but the dialogue in the comic was really bad. It almost felt like placeholder dialogue, like he was going to go back and rewrite it later.

  • @Rather Dashing said: LucasArts made tones of money off their adventures too. Secret of Monkey Island wasn't some niche game, it sold extremely well in its own market environment. Around the time of Grim Fandango, though, they found a revenue stream that produced far more dough. Grim Fandango wasn't even a failure, it sold relatively well, but the trade-off between doing something like that and doing Star Wars again was obvious: You get more money out of putting less work into a Star Wars game. So they did.

    Well thankfully Telltale don't have a department that exclusively churn out Star Wars games at an unsustainable rate :rolleyes: The history of LucasArts is well documented. I can't see Telltale going down that path because aside from a couple of poker games and a puzzle game, they exclusively make adventure games and the most profitable kinds of adventure games are the the quirky fun ones like Monkey Island. I can't see them up and abandoning their market, a market that has been very good to them, by completely changing the kind of games they make.

    Edit: It's also worth pointing out that several Telltale employees used to work at the LusasArts Adventure Game department and were spurned by that whole experience so they have the benefit of hindsight.

  • Er... there are FUTURAMA comics too...

  • But it's not a just launched TV property. Futurama's TV launch was in 1999.

  • LucasArts didn't develop Star Wars games either, until 1993. From 1986 to 1992, they made almost exclusively adventure games with original IPs, with a couple LucasFilm license games and flight sims aside. That's six years free of the Star Wars license, about as long as Telltale has been around and making games. If you said, around the release of X-Wing in 1993, that LucasArts was all about Star Wars games? People would think the idea pretty odd as well. In a process over the next 7 years, they killed off the genre's presence in their studio(going into hiatus a couple times, so it's not like it was 7 years of constant development). And then over the past 10 years, we have two remakes and a character skin thrown into another release as a cross-promotional afterthought.

    It's not like the adventure genre hadn't at one time "treated LucasArts well", it's not like they stopped being profitable. Other things became MORE profitable. If a new audience for action blockbuster games is far larger and more profitable than the one you're in, then you can be sure you'll be tossed out like last month's leftovers.

    You can't see a company wanting to make more money? Give it time. Like a few more companies, even after massive amounts of staff leave the building. Over time, you'll learn that it's not something that is impossible. Hell, it's not even a possibility, it's a law of the fucking universe.

  • @Rather Dashing said: It's not like the adventure genre hadn't at one time "treated LucasArts well", it's not like they stopped being profitable. Other things became MORE profitable. If a new audience for action blockbuster games is far larger and more profitable than the one you're in, then you can be sure you'll be tossed out like last month's leftovers.

    I see what you are saying and your point is well made but I still disagree. First off Telltale doesn't have a lucrative licence like Star Wars just sitting in it's back pocket like LucasArts did. Every game they licence they will owe a share of the profits to the rightful owners, thus diminishing their returns. Second off even the licence games they make, like Back to the Future and Wallice & Gromit, are designed just like the classic adventure games (with the exception of being episodic). They are still fun and quirky adventures in the same vein and structure as the LucasArts classics. I'm also willing to bet that future games, like Jurassic Park, will be as well, though admittedly they have to experiment to try and ad an element of danger, but at the end of the day it will still be an adventure game.

    LucasArts was an exception in the industry because they had licences like Star Wars and Indy sitting around that appeal far more to mainstream audiences. LucasArts is sinking its own ship though, the Star Wars licence is becoming stagnant, more and more gamers are realising that rushed crappy games like the Force Unleashed just isn't worth their time. If it wasn't for the mega hype surrounding their licences they'd probably already be under.

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