User Avatar Image

BTTF "Share your disappointment" Thread

posted by ADAMATION on - last edited - Viewed by 802 users

Okay, so 2 months or so ago, I posted a comment about how this game was going to suck for the following reasons..

A.) Point and click
B.) Linear gameplay

After getting bitched out by telltale radicals I thought, well...maybe it won't be as bad as I am thinking. And at least it's a modern, 3D BTTF game. God was I wrong. After playing the demo and watching in horror at the gameplay videos online..I totally lost all hope in getting an awesome BTTF game. And the worst part is, look at the Jurassic Park trailer. It looks awesome. It's not cartoony, and from what Ive read its NOT going to be point and click. Apparently the designer said it wouldnt feel right to walk around aimlessly solving puzzles..? So why the hell is the Back to the Future game just that?! Whats the difference between BTTF and JP? Theyre both adventure movies. So why does JP get to be an awesome adventure game and BTTF, which is probably more popular anyway, is a cartoony, restricted, puzzle game? I just don't get it.....And to those of you out there who are going to rip me to shreads about not knowing what BTTF is about or sarcasticly tell me theyre sorry that its not like GTA, this time I know I am right that BTTF did not get the game it deserved.

So anyone out there who agrees with me, share your story. And if you disagree with me, please tell me why I should like the BTTF game.

Thanks

87 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • User Avatar Image
    Jennifer Moderator

    I don't think it's a bad game, per se. I enjoyed both episodes. I like the art direction, the story, the music, and the voice acting.

    Unfortunately, it's much like Doctor Who: The Adventure Games. They got the atmosphere right, but the puzzles lack originality and they are overused (like the Einstein sniffing puzzles). The bugs take you out of the game (in particular for me, the lip-synch problems in the first episode, and the problem with characters calling you multiple names in both episodes).

    On the good side puzzle-wise, I did enjoy the doorman puzzle in the second episode. It required thinking outside the box, yet still within the realm of real-world logic, and it was a nice shout-out to a puzzle in Monkey Island 2 without being a direct copy. :)

    Telltale always seems to get their act together by the third episode after listening to fan criticisms, so I still remain hopeful for this one. I'd like to be able to play a great Back to the Future game instead of just a decent one. :)

  • @ChrisLaughlin said: My question is this. Who would be satisfied with these games? Who is the target audience? Gamers have come to expect a very high level of polish, challenge and overall quality from their games. BTTF is buggy, boring, bad storytelling, bad adventure-gaming, bad puzzle-gaming, bad action-gaming, etc, etc, etc.

    wut

    Yeah, it has ATROCIOUS action gaming! It's so bad, it has......none of that at all.

    Bad storytelling? What game are you playing?

    Lastly, I think it's pretty clear at this point that Back to the Future: The Game is NOT FOR ADVENTURE GAMERS! It's for fans of the movies, and many of those are not too great at games. Therefore, the game is toned down in difficulty and complexity.

    It's not for gamers, adventure or otherwise. It's for those who liked the Back to the Future story and wanted to see more.

  • User Avatar Image
    Vainamoinen Moderator

    @ChrisLaughlin said: Who is the target audience?

    Fans of the movies who really, really want a fourth movie.
    It is as simple as that, I think.

  • @Triloge said: wut

    It's not for gamers, adventure or otherwise. It's for those who liked the Back to the Future story and wanted to see more.

    Which is why they made it a game?

  • @Triloge said: Lastly, I think it's pretty clear at this point that Back to the Future: The Game is NOT FOR ADVENTURE GAMERS! It's for fans of the movies, and many of those are not too great at games. Therefore, the game is toned down in difficulty and complexity.

    It's not for gamers, adventure or otherwise. It's for those who liked the Back to the Future story and wanted to see more.

    I think this is a fair point actually. I'm enjoying the story so I don't mind that I'm not that thrilled with the gameplay. It'd just be nice if it didn't have so many glitches.

  • @guitarsareboring said: I think this is a fair point actually. I'm enjoying the story so I don't mind that I'm not that thrilled with the gameplay. It'd just be nice if it didn't have so many glitches.

    You're right. It is a fair point, and it's a hilarious point. The game is not for adventure gamers, nor even for gamers. A game not for gamers. Brilliant. I really don't know why it hadn't dawned on me before. It all makes perfect sense.
    :rolleyes:

  • All the people who keep saying they wish it was a Grand Theft Auto style game where you can get in the DeLorean and drive around, I'm interested... how exactly do you envision that game being? I mean, there would have to be more to it than just driving around Hill Valley.

  • @McSuperfly101 said: All the people who keep saying they wish it was a Grand Theft Auto style game where you can get in the DeLorean and drive around, I'm interested... how exactly do you envision that game being? I mean, there would have to be more to it than just driving around Hill Valley.

    Here is a post from another forum from a couple of years ago that sums it up nicely. Since it was a general video game forum and not just people who think adventure games are the only valid storytelling genre (like here), it was very well received:


    Yea, it's incredibly obvious to make a licensed Back to the Future game GTA-style. Somebody has to get moving on that.

    At least 4 different time periods in approximately the same area of land - 1885, 1955, 1985, 2015. Maybe throw another time period in for game plot purposes. I actually envision it taking place in 1986, so possibly move each era up a year. BttF is tied so much to "1985", that starting a new game or movie with that slow music and the subtitle "Saturday, October 25th [pause]... 1986" rather than '85 would induce a goosebumps feeling I cannot describe.

    You can travel through time whenever and wind up in the same spot in whatever period you travel to, obviously, piece of cake. If the hardware is advanced enough they could possibly record some of the player's actions so that you could risk running into your "other self" if you dick around too much.

    Much of the gameplay is so glaringly obvious, it's just sitting right there ripe for the picking. It starts off with you getting hold of a new DeLorean time machine (shouldn't be terribly difficult to figure out a story here - Doc writes a letter from the past saying that his family is in trouble and he had previously hidden a new time machine for Marty in case something like this ever arose, whatever). In the beginning, you're limited by the vehicle's capabilities. You need plutonium for travel so you have to find it and use it sparingly (this is obv the basis for some missions). You also need to find long enough stretches of road to get up to 88 MPH, sometimes while being chased or under time constraints, etc.

    Eventually you are able to get some upgrades, Mr. Fusion (use garbage instead of plutonium) and flight added to the car.

    All this, and I haven't even MENTIONED the word "hoverboard" yet.

    Michael J. Fox can reprise his role since it's just voice. Obviously Christopher Lloyd would do it.

    Jesus Christ get the **** on this.

  • @JuntMonkey said: Here is a post from another forum from a couple of years ago that sums it up nicely. Since it was a general video game forum and not just people who think adventure games are the only valid storytelling genre (like here), it was very well received:


    Yea, it's incredibly obvious to make a licensed Back to the Future game GTA-style. Somebody has to get moving on that.

    At least 4 different time periods in approximately the same area of land - 1885, 1955, 1985, 2015. Maybe throw another time period in for game plot purposes. I actually envision it taking place in 1986, so possibly move each era up a year. BttF is tied so much to "1985", that starting a new game or movie with that slow music and the subtitle "Saturday, October 25th [pause]... 1986" rather than '85 would induce a goosebumps feeling I cannot describe.

    You can travel through time whenever and wind up in the same spot in whatever period you travel to, obviously, piece of cake. If the hardware is advanced enough they could possibly record some of the player's actions so that you could risk running into your "other self" if you dick around too much.

    Much of the gameplay is so glaringly obvious, it's just sitting right there ripe for the picking. It starts off with you getting hold of a new DeLorean time machine (shouldn't be terribly difficult to figure out a story here - Doc writes a letter from the past saying that his family is in trouble and he had previously hidden a new time machine for Marty in case something like this ever arose, whatever). In the beginning, you're limited by the vehicle's capabilities. You need plutonium for travel so you have to find it and use it sparingly (this is obv the basis for some missions). You also need to find long enough stretches of road to get up to 88 MPH, sometimes while being chased or under time constraints, etc.

    Eventually you are able to get some upgrades, Mr. Fusion (use garbage instead of plutonium) and flight added to the car.

    All this, and I haven't even MENTIONED the word "hoverboard" yet.

    Michael J. Fox can reprise his role since it's just voice. Obviously Christopher Lloyd would do it.

    Jesus Christ get the **** on this.

    Where's the money to make this game coming from? Grand Theft Auto IV cost $100 million to make. I can't imagine how much they're spending on L.A. Noire.

    If I had a choice between:
    a) a far-off chance of playing a game based on a licensed property that I love that takes five to ten years to make and costs millions of dollars to produce, potentially flopping due to its niche audience and bankrupting the game studio

    and

    b) getting quick, episodic games based on that property that are mildly buggy with sluggish movement, but capture the atmosphere of the property pretty damn well

    I'll go with b) just about every time.

  • @paulmccain said: Where's the money to make this game coming from? Grand Theft Auto IV cost $100 million to make. I can't imagine how much they're spending on L.A. Noire.

    What does that matter? AAA games cost money. The game "recording some of your actions" is the only aspect of that description that would be unreasonable compared to other A+ games of today, and that part is acknowledged in the post as unlikely with current hardware.

    Older movie licenses such as The Godfather 1 & 2, Scarface, and The Warriors have recently been made into open world games, and Ghostbusters as a regular action game. All were well received except for GF2. To say that BTTF is not worthy of an A+ budget and development cycle doesn't really fly.

Add Comment