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posted by RAnthonyMahan on - last edited - Viewed by 540 users

As I'm sure you all know, the style of the old Sierra adventures like King's Quest is drastically different from the "Exploration shouldn't be punished" philosophy employed by LucasArts (and later Telltale). The slightest step out of line can easily kill you, or even worse, render the game unwinnable, usually with the game's narrator making snarky jokes about your suffering.

I'm not trying to be another one of those complainers going "Telltale can't make a proper King's Quest game because they've never done something like that before!" Instead my question is...how do you want the game to be done? Would you like a return to full-on Sierra sadism, or for Telltale to stick with the friendly approach they've always used so far?

I'd personally like if there can be a little bit of both. Don't get me wrong, I want this game to be frustratingly hard, but stuff like unwinnable situations are just too much. And in the era of auto-saving, I think death should be treated the same way as in The Tomb of Sammun-Mak: you're immediately taken back to where you were before.

What do you think?

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  • When I was a kid we had what in retrospect must have been a beta copy of KQII for some reason. On each screen the colors would flood fill in seperately before you could move, all of the text appeared at the bottom where the cursor goes, and most importantly, you couldn't save the game! I still remember nights when all of the kids in my family would be huddled around our old Tandy, watching my oldest sister pick her way through the poison brambles around Dracula's castle (since we always killed the snake instead of giving it the bridle to get the invincibility sugar cube), cheering her on as she picked her way through, pixel by pixel, knowing that any single misstep would force us all to completely restart the game. And then, half of the time, if we made it through that, it was almost a sure thing that Graham would die falling down the stairs at the end of the game.

    THAT was torturous gameplay. KQV has nothing on that mess.

  • @MisterKerr said: When I was a kid we had what in retrospect must have been a beta copy of KQII for some reason. On each screen the colors would flood fill in seperately before you could move, all of the text appeared at the bottom where the cursor goes, and most importantly, you couldn't save the game! I still remember nights when all of the kids in my family would be huddled around our old Tandy, watching my oldest sister pick her way through the poison brambles around Dracula's castle (since we always killed the snake instead of giving it the bridle to get the invincibility sugar cube), cheering her on as she picked her way through, pixel by pixel, knowing that any single misstep would force us all to completely restart the game. And then, half of the time, if we made it through that, it was almost a sure thing that Graham would die falling down the stairs at the end of the game.

    THAT was torturous gameplay. KQV has nothing on that mess.


    You must have really had a beta version, indeed! All of the narrative text appearing in the black space at the bottom of the screen was also what happened in the original IBM PCjr release of KQ1, waaaaay back in 1984. 27 years ago now!

    The "modern" 16-color DOS version of KQ1 AGI, with white pop-up text boxes for narration, came out only in 1987; the first PC release, in 1984, was CGA 4-color and followed the mold of the PCjr version. Of course, by 1987, KQ2 had already been released, back in 1985. So it would seem KQ2 was the first Sierra game to use a separate, special pop-up window for narrative text, instead of cramming it down into the parser field.

  • One of the things that worries me is how episodic distribution is going to affect the open-endedness of the game. Most of the King's Quest games do have segments where the player is restricted to a locale, but most of them also features a main exploration area where the meat of the content and inventory items are found.

    Things I want & don't want

    +Narrator
    +Based on mythology and fairytales
    +Icon & Parser interface. Would like them merged together.
    +Deaths, with a retry button.
    +Exploration.
    +Multiple solutions.
    +Point system, to emphasize optimal solutions.
    +Ingame fairytale book, for the uninitiated and to serve as an hintbook.
    +Logical puzzles. Rumplestiltskin...bleh...
    +Art style that resembles King's Quest V & VI.
    +Music & Atmospheric effects.

    -Episodic distribution, it might not work well with the open-ended exploration of King's Quest, unless exploration areas are segregated for each chapter.
    -Seriousness. At least if it resembles Mask of Eternity. :(
    -Dead ends. They are pure crud.
    -No dedicated combat system, please. KQ8 leaves bitter memories.

  • @Sabin Stargem said: Things I want & don't want

    +Narrator

    It really does need a narrator.

  • @Sabin Stargem said: Things I want & don't want


    +Based on mythology and fairytales


    It really does need to be based on mythology and fairytales.

  • +Icon & Parser interface. Would like them merged together.

    The only time I've seen that was when I played the King's Quest I remake from AGDI at the part where you have guess Rumpelstilskin's name. That may work on a computer, but how would you get it to work with a platform like PS3, Wii or Xbox 360? Would it be like Animal Crossing where you are asked a question, like what's your name, and a screen would show up with a space where you could enter the answer, and a keyboard would be underneath that would allow you to select the letters one by one to fill in that space? With the iPad it might be easier because you would be able to tap the box, and then the onscreen keyboard would pop up, and then you could type in the answer to the question.

    +Deaths, with a retry button.

    How would you like it? Should it be like TSL where it's a small rectangular box with the message written inside and underneath there would be buttons that would say retry, restore, and quit? Or should it be like King's Quest VII where the screen is all black with the words "You Have Expired" written in big letters atthe top, a head shot of the character who died and says something like, "Drat it! I just should have been more decisive." in the middle, and the option of retrying, restoring or quitting at the very bottom?

  • Check out the Quest for Glory II remake, it has a combo-parsing system, specifically for the dialogue trees. Very good innovation that I hope Telltale might use someday.

    One way I can see it working for a console would be to have a Parser Menu, with 3 submenus that correspond to Letters, Words, and Sentences that can be used in the game. Select one of them, and a part of your parser command is created, to varying degrees according to which menu you are using.

    EX1 - Letters
    [Just the alphabet here]

    EX2 - Words

    Rock
    Snake
    Punch
    Look
    Talk
    Press
    Kiss
    Button

    EX3 - Sentences

    Press the ______ (Click on the sentence, then add letters or a sentence to complete...)

    Look up the _____

    Tie __ to tree

    EX3A

    Press the Button.

    Look up mineshaft.

    Tie rope to tree.

  • @Sabin Stargem said: Tie rope to tree.

    - Oh, be careful Graham!
    Crack

    Seriously though, if they figured out 20 years ago that people (not you, I mean real people) didn't want text parsers, I don't think they will come back now.

    Except if they are mind-reading parsers. I would dig that.

  • I like text parsers in the sense that they allow for a potentially wider array of actions we can take in these games. While I certainly appreciate the ease of use that an icon-based interface grants, I feel a bit more limited.

    That is why I would suggest a combo-parser system, so that game developers can figure out how to advance the uses of parsing, and how to still keep the game user-friendly. Hence, why I thought a Letters-Words-Sentences system would be good for console users, since they could use it as a shortcut for creating sentences without requiring a keyboard.

    By the way, I find it rather odd that your argument is dependent on considering me to not be a genuine person, instead of actually offering reasons for why people wouldn't want Parsers. The reasons should not be hard to come by.

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