User Avatar Image

Skyrim Trailer

posted by Wusel on - last edited - Viewed by 287 users

I just saw the trailer to Bethesda's new game "Skyrim" ("The Elder Scrolls V")
and wanted to ask if you are as excited about the game as I am.
The music is epic and there are actual dragons in it. :) Be prepared to fetch my money, guys at Bethesda!

So, how do you like the trailer and The Elder Scrolls in general?

45 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Rather Dashing said: Don't get me started on how dumbed-down this is going to be. We're dropping magical schools, we're dropping classes, and they can't even make a 30-second teaser without taking a gigantic shit over the lore they built with Daggerfall and Morrowind.

    Source: Imperial Library - Daggerfall Books

    Lol, you never quit do you?

  • To be honest, I like the idea of no classes. I mean, if you want to be good at using a bow, start using a bow, if you want to carry heavy armor, start wearing heavy armor, etc etc. Isn't that that it's supposed to be? I'm looking forward to this. There's a good chance they've learnt from the mistakes they did with Oblivion (which I still enjoyed regardless). It's not the dumbing down that was the problem with Oblivion, but the biggest problem stems from the levelling system, and that the world levelled with you in an unrealistic manner (simple thieves wearing high-level armor, while robbing you for 100 gold pieces) and you never really felt more powerful because of this. Levelling was more or less pointless for most of the game.

    But despite this, I thoroughly enjoyed spendnig hours upon hours in the game. The Dark Brotherhood and the Thieve's Guild questline were both particularly good. The latter could just as well have been the main quest. Which I never finished by the way (the main quest that is).

    Funny (sad?) fact, I've played an insane amount of hours on both the PS3 version and the X360 version, but never spent much time on the PC version.

    If you want to see a dumbed down disaster of a sequel, look at Dragon Age 2. The Elder Scrolls at least does it gradually-

  • @StarEye said: To be honest, I like the idea of no classes. I mean, if you want to be good at using a bow, start using a bow, if you want to carry heavy armor, start wearing heavy armor, etc etc. Isn't that that it's supposed to be? I'm looking forward to this. There's a good chance they've learnt from the mistakes they did with Oblivion (which I still enjoyed regardless). It's not the dumbing down that was the problem with Oblivion, but the biggest problem stems from the levelling system, and that the world levelled with you in an unrealistic manner (simple thieves wearing high-level armor, while robbing you for 100 gold pieces) and you never really felt more powerful because of this. Levelling was more or less pointless for most of the game.
    -

    The leveling in Oblivion was pretty bad. Bethesda said they are not going to level up the enemies like in Oblivion, and it will be similar to what they did for Fallout 3.

  • @corruptbiggins said: Like you need the help to get started! :)

    Besides, it's their lore - surely they can do whatever the hell they like with it.

    Well it's stupid to come up with a background for your world and then just ignoring it.

    @corruptbiggins said: Don't get me started on how dumbed-down this is going to be.

    Source: Imperial Library - Daggerfall Books

    I think there's gonna be 'good' dragons in it as well. I remember reading it somewhere. I'm not an expert or owt, jus' sayin

  • We didn't really get a sense of what the dragons would be like in the trailer. They showed the player fighting dragons and dragons attacking, but you can't really tell much from it.

  • @GuybrushWilco said: We didn't really get a sense of what the dragons would be like in the trailer. They showed the player fighting dragons and dragons attacking, but you can't really tell much from it.


    The problem is that dragons don't really usually look like that. And they have no reason to attack other territory, because they are mostly fine living on their mountaintops without being bothered. And they tend to not even like working together. And basically everything about their nature would require a huge retroactive plot device to force them into something that even sort of makes sense, but hey that's only people who played the second game and read the books. Who cares about those idiots? The people who even played that game, let alone someone that actually read the books and found them to be a beautiful and excellent way to expand the fantasy world into something real and believable, something that gave the game depth and value.

    I'd love to be proven wrong on this count. There is very little in the computer RPG world lately that is great. I don't know if I should blame the console audience or just the general thrust of the industry toward two monotonous genres with slightly different side elements(third and first person action genres, mostly the same with slight differences). Todd Howard is doing a lot in interviews and podcasts to make me feel wary, though. He describes game and story elements in more detail. He has called the dragons "beasts" and "something you should be scared of when you see them", and he seems to care more about a certain temple having exactly 7,000 steps than any sort of discrepancy that makes the universe's game world not seem horrifically inconsistent and fluid.

  • The storyline could very well provide a logical reason as to why the dragons would leave the comfort of their mountain caves to attack. Perhaps someone declared war on the dragons? Maybe some are being controlled some some magical force.

  • Both of those sound extremely weak. Even if there is something even remotely resembling a "logical reason", the logical reason is robbing the dragons of their depth and intelligence, which is part of why they're so engaging even when you're only reading about them in text form. Todd Howard has outlined the game as, essentially, one in which you hunt and kill Dragons for powerful spells. Seeing them reduced to that feels, at the very least, disappointing.

  • I did hear that the dragons would speak in the game, and that they would come in different types.

  • They write, at the very least, and the written language they have produced for the game is extremely nice and I love the look and logic of it. What I don't like is that the lore seems to now exist as a means of apologizing for the way the gameplay completely contradicts it, and I feel like the brunt of the main gameplay experience will take us through "You're a badass dragonslayer isn't that cool?!" territory. Bethesda as of late has had this problem, it was strongly present in Fallout 3 and in Oblivion, where they don't make cohesive and believable worlds anymore. They sort of lay down a template, like:

    -Temperate fantasy forest(which was supposed to be a rainforest, by the way)
    -Post-apocalyptic D.C.
    -Rugged fantasy mountains)

    And then just pepper it with "cool shit", stuff that is neat but doesn't necessarily have to "fit" or "work" or build up to anything in terms of a real world that you feel could actually be a place. It's more a showcase of neat things that are tossed together to create "experiences". Maybe my taste in RPGs is completely different from what everyone else's is, but I am far more engaged in an RPG when I believe that the world I'm inhabiting could actually be a place. Take, for example, Obsidian's Fallout: New Vegas. That place had people who had real backstories, places that actually fit into the game's world, and a consistent feel that made you think that(despite the odd fantastical elements), this place was a real and consistent thing. Places don't exist in a vacuum, or at least they don't appear to, as they acknowledge and understand the world around them. They don't come off as some one-off nugget in the wasteland, but as a thing that is affected by and affects the world around it. That's what makes a great RPG world, and I don't think that Bethesda is up to the task(or wants to be up to the task) of actually making that work.

Add Comment