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KQ6: Overrated?

posted by Anakin Skywalker on - last edited - Viewed by 5.7K users

I know I'm committing blasphemy in the eyes of many KQ die hards by saying this, but am I alone in feeling that KQ6 is overrated? KQ6 kind of reminds me of TSL--It's a little too dark, it's dialogue is a little too formal and clinical (it's a bit too wordy and not to the point as the previous games), it strives--and goes overboard--in trying to get a mature, "epic" feel. It loses that fun, bright, mindless, lighthearted fairy tale feel which characterized the previous games, especially KQV (which is IMO the pinnacle of the series in many ways).

It's kind of like KQ meets GK (a series I've personally never cared for) in some ways with it's story of political intrigue, a dark murderous plot, and a secret society. It takes things into an adult sort of direction--As in, more catered to adults rather than the whole family as the previous games were.

That's not to say it doesn't have it's light moments--of course it does. But the lighthearted moments don't feel nearly as innocent or as natural as in KQV or KQVII--They feel almost kind of forced.

I actually find KQVII to be a better KQ sequel than VI. KQ7 to me is like Roberta meets Don Bluth--which IMO is a good mix.

I'll put it this way: KQVI opened the door to TSL. That makes it bad enough:p

268 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Irishmile said: I think that KQ6 (and KQ5 for that matter) actually has been undeservedly forgotten over the years.

    I think people are much kinder to the Lucasarts adventure games and they forget just how much Sierra and Lucasarts MADE each other better.. Much to the benefit of we the gamers. 5 and 6 are really important in terms of what we expect a great adventure game to be like... so I think that if anything they deserve more reverence and surely not less.

    Yeah, definitely. But this thread is about whether or not KQ6 is overrated in the context of the rest of the series. Which is another argument entirely. ;)

  • @der_ketzer said:
    In KQ5 the story parts were short and ignoreable. KQ6 beats you over the head with it again, again and again. I hate it.

    This is interesting... I agree, but I think of that as a knock against KQ5. Here do you mean it as a positive? I find it annoying if I only get little quips from characters, and don't build up any feeling for them.

    I think KQ5 was a drop in quality from KQ4, due to its random story and incoherent world.

    I thought KQ6 made the series much more compelling for all the reasons people say. One thing I don't think was mentioned, was that I thought somehow had the most believable and coherent world to explore until that point (don't remember KQ7 as well, but I think it kept this up fairly well). KQ6's brief mentions of politics and interrelationships between characters and groups of people let me believe in the world a little more, and get lost better in my escapist fantasy. Other KQ games seemed to have many disparate, unrelated people living near to each other, which my brain just can't get into.

  • @Irishmile said: I think that KQ6 (and KQ5 for that matter) actually has been undeservedly forgotten over the years.

    absolutely. I first heard of them a few years ago and wondered why I did not stumble across them before. Then a few months later the KQ & SQ collection was on sale on steam and I got them. I had played thew remakes of KQ1 + 2 by that time and really enjoyed the originals too.

    The first and only Sierra adventure I played before that was LSL 7. And I really loved that. But I never saw the other games of the series anywhere.

  • I loved KQV's world but it's marred from the fact it isn't has limited narration. More than previous games but still limited. KQ6 had the most sophisticated narration in the series, probably the best aspect of the game to me, you can look at almost everything. But I'm not nearly as interested in the character of Alexander, compared to Graham.

    KQ7 did away with all narration so there was nothing to describe what you saw, I truly dislike that. It makes the world seem less thought out even more so. It lost a lot without narration. It didn't even have a travel guide type manual to make things more interesting. I also wasn't impressed about how disneyfied they made it. The villain is to silly.

  • @Lambonius said: Yeah, definitely. But this thread is about whether or not KQ6 is overrated in the context of the rest of the series. Which is another argument entirely. ;)

    :o OOOOHHHHH I was supposed to read the thread first :D

  • @Lambonius said: Well that's just the thing--what people (even fans) so often don't "get" about the Sierra classics. They aren't about story. They are about exploration and discovery. Story provides a framework for the exploration and discovery, but it should not intrude on or overshadow it, as it does in KQ6 (and most certainly does in TSL.) This is why King's Quest games started going downhill after King's Quest 5.

    This is why so many of us are so uneasy about Telltale trying to handle a Sierra franchise.

    I disagree. Sure, the first couple KQ weren't about story, but that was more to do with innovating a new type of game than anything else. As the series went on it became more and more about story. What I consider better series by them (Space Quest, Quest for Glory, Gabriel Knight) were always about story. They came later, and didn't have to worry so much about innovating (not that they didn't innovate in their own ways). I'm not saying that's everything they're about, but it is certainly a large part of what they were, and something I and many other fans loved about them. Really, that's why I didn't like the first two KQ games as much.

    I am a bit uneasy about TT handling the series, but hopefully they adapt to the Sierra-style adventure more than trying to adapt the game to their style which, as others have pointed out, would ruin the KQ feeling of the game.

    @Lambonius said: But I'm not nearly as interested in the character of Alexander, compared to Graham.

    Huh, really? I always loved Alexander's games better than the others in the series. Ah well, to each their own.

  • @Tallin said: I disagree. Sure, the first couple KQ weren't about story, but that was more to do with innovating a new type of game than anything else. As the series went on it became more and more about story. What I consider better series by them (Space Quest, Quest for Glory, Gabriel Knight) were always about story. They came later, and didn't have to worry so much about innovating (not that they didn't innovate in their own ways). I'm not saying that's everything they're about, but it is certainly a large part of what they were, and something I and many other fans loved about them. Really, that's why I didn't like the first two KQ games as much.

    I'm not just talking about the first two King's Quest games, though. KQ3, 4, 5, and even 6 still captured the sense of being free to explore and interact with the world at your leisure--this quality of the games stood out in front of any story elements, particularly in KQ3-5.

    Even Gabriel Knight (especially the first game) was all about exploring the city and various areas available to you in depth. The story opened up new areas gradually, but only after you had thoroughly discovered just about everything there was to discover in the previous areas.

    This sense of freedom is all but gone from Telltale's games. Recapturing this is essential to creating a game that is at all faithful to the King's Quest legacy.

  • @Lambonius said: I'm not just talking about the first two King's Quest games, though. KQ3, 4, 5, and even 6 still captured the sense of being free to explore and interact with the world at your leisure--this quality of the games stood out in front of any story elements, particularly in KQ3-5.

    Even Gabriel Knight (especially the first game) was all about exploring the city and various areas available to you in depth. The story opened up new areas gradually, but only after you had thoroughly discovered just about everything there was to discover in the previous areas.

    This sense of freedom is all but gone from Telltale's games. Recapturing this is essential to creating a game that is at all faithful to the King's Quest legacy.

    Perhaps for you. For me, the exploration was part of telling the story. The story wasn't just the cutscenes, it was all the things you found out in between that really filled it out. The cutscenes were just more compressed story.

    Still, I agree that Telltale will have to change a lot about how they make games to do this one properly. The LucasArts-style game they have almost universally made won't fly for a Sierra sequel/reboot/whatever.

  • I don't dislike Alex, I just happen to like Graham better.

    IMO, the early KQ games told their stories, and explained the world, through how you interacted with the world. You had to manually use your senses to search, 'look', 'drink', 'touch', 'talk', etc. The backstories of the world and descriptions of the world were awarded through the player's direct involvement. The more creative the player was with use of verbs, the more details would be uncovered about the world. Each game after KQ1 started getting progressively more sophisticated descriptions.

    In some games, you'd do the same thing but through reading books scattered throughout the world, see the Thief series for example. KQ and early Sierra games did it through the player's direct interaction. This is how you explored the world.

    Later games starting with the mouse driven/icons lost alot of that direct interaction, but you still had some interactivity with the hand or eye icons. KQ7 did away with interactions entirely.

    I would love for Telltale to mimic the older way somehow. It would be cool if they even tossed in a parser for anyone who might want to play it old school. But on top of that having a more sophisticated story of the later games (as long as the stories aren't convoluted).

  • @Tallin said: Perhaps for you. For me, the exploration was part of telling the story. The story wasn't just the cutscenes, it was all the things you found out in between that really filled it out. The cutscenes were just more compressed story.

    I think we are mostly on the same page, actually. I don't want to be led along from cutscene to cutscene--I want to discover bits of the story as I go, through interaction and exploration.

    This is probably why I prefer Quest for Glory over King's Quest. In QFG, the story wasn't told to the player at all. It was the player's actions that MADE the story. Now that was an adventure game! ;)

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