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Roberta Williams/Josh Mandel discussion

posted by tomst on - last edited - Viewed by 2.5K users

Congrats to the Telltale team for announcing the return of mid-30 year old males (and anyone else old enough to remember this series) to the world of computer gaming!

Can anyone from TT comment on Roberta Williams's involvement in terms of story & design, if such plans even exist?

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  • @doom saber said: Just seems like if there is a game with less involvement from the original character, people would think the creator hates it. I remember how there were rumors about the creator of Dragonball not liking Dragonball GT despite there isn't any source.

    That's true, but he did hate Dragonball Evolution, but then again, who doesn't?

  • @joek86 said: That's true, but he did hate Dragonball Evolution, but then again, who doesn't?


    There is not a single negative statement by Akira Toriyama regarding Evolution. Hell, I don't think I've ever seen a quote from him that is negative about anything other than his own work. He's really laid-back when it comes to his creations.

  • @Rather Dashing said: There is not a single negative statement by Akira Toriyama regarding Evolution. Hell, I don't think I've ever seen a quote from him that is negative about anything other than his own work. He's really laid-back when it comes to his creations.

    NVM misread your comment

  • @Rather Dashing said: There is not a single negative statement by Akira Toriyama regarding Evolution. Hell, I don't think I've ever seen a quote from him that is negative about anything other than his own work. He's really laid-back when it comes to his creations.

    here is the quote:

    As the original creator, I had a feeling of "Huh?" upon seeing the screenplay and the character designs, but the director, all the actors, the staff, and the rest are nothing but "ultra" high-caliber people. Maybe the right way for me and all the fans to appreciate it is as a New Dragonball of a different dimension. Perhaps, this might become a great masterpiece of power! Hey, I look forward to it!!

    http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2009-02-08/akira-toriyama-comments-on-live-action-dragonball-film

  • Al Lowe did a tremendous amount on Freddy Pharkas, and, as with all his games, he was primarily responsible for it. He did the original design document (which isn't the one on his website; that's a much later iteration, close to the final version if not THE final version); subsequent versions of the design were worked out between the two of us, and he always had final say -- which is exactly how it should've been, given that he was by far more experienced than I was, and his name was going to be first and foremost on the box and in the marketing. I was to receive the benefit of an overseer on my first game, ensuring an expected level of quality, and his name on the box would guarantee that it would sell even if I didn't perform.

    Most of the puzzles and plot were his, particularly in the first half of the game. He wrote a little of the text and a little of the music. Parts of the finished game, we designed together, some large parts were virtually all his and some smaller parts were virtually all mine. I conceived and wrote the ballads (based on the backstory that Al had written), 95% or more of the text, gags, dialogue and narration, fleshed out the characters and locations, designed and wrote the demo, wrote about 95% of the manual, did all the producer duties, and directed the game on a daily basis. Al oversaw everything, checking it all frequently to see that things met his standards and making fine-tuning changes all along the way.

    There were many, many things I wanted to do with the game, and Al let me do almost all of them, even when he was uncertain of the direction I was going. I don't recall him "flexing his muscles" very often (I can only think of two broad areas where he regularly overruled me: I thought we REALLY didn't need puzzles involving both flatulence AND diarrhea in the same game, and I really don't like timed puzzles). But overall, Al was a flexible, generous, and thoughtful co-designer and guide, and I learned a great deal from him.

    Many, many months later, when they decided to make a CD version, Al did everything involved in the conversion: he cast and directed the voice work and supervised the whole process (I was busy working on SQ6 and trying, on a daily basis, to get Scott to co-design it, but his mind and spirit were far elsewhere by then).

    Al is as much Freddy's Dad as I am, perhaps more or less depending on where one feels the soul of a game comes from. He was in every way an absolutely formative and positive force, from start to finish.

    I hope that makes things clearer.

    Sometimes, we lurk.

    Josh

  • @Josho said: Al Lowe did a tremendous amount on Freddy Pharkas, and, as with all his games, he was primarily responsible for it. He did the original design document (which isn't the one on his website; that's a much later iteration, close to the final version if not THE final version); subsequent versions of the design were worked out between the two of us, and he always had final say -- which is exactly how it should've been, given that he was by far more experienced than I was, and his name was going to be first and foremost on the box and in the marketing. I was to receive the benefit of an overseer on my first game, ensuring an expected level of quality, and his name on the box would guarantee that it would sell even if I didn't perform.

    Most of the puzzles and plot were his, particularly in the first half of the game. He wrote a little of the text and a little of the music. Parts of the finished game, we designed together, some large parts were virtually all his and some smaller parts were virtually all mine. I conceived and wrote the ballads (based on the backstory that Al had written), 95% or more of the text, gags, dialogue and narration, fleshed out the characters and locations, designed and wrote the demo, wrote about 95% of the manual, did all the producer duties, and directed the game on a daily basis. Al oversaw everything, checking it all frequently to see that things met his standards and making fine-tuning changes all along the way.

    There were many, many things I wanted to do with the game, and Al let me do almost all of them, even when he was uncertain of the direction I was going. I don't recall him "flexing his muscles" very often (I can only think of two broad areas where he regularly overruled me: I thought we REALLY didn't need puzzles involving both flatulence AND diarrhea in the same game, and I really don't like timed puzzles). But overall, Al was a flexible, generous, and thoughtful co-designer and guide, and I learned a great deal from him.

    Many, many months later, when they decided to make a CD version, Al did everything involved in the conversion: he cast and directed the voice work and supervised the whole process (I was busy working on SQ6 and trying, on a daily basis, to get Scott to co-design it, but his mind and spirit were far elsewhere by then).

    Al is as much Freddy's Dad as I am, perhaps more or less depending on where one feels the soul of a game comes from. He was in every way an absolutely formative and positive force, from start to finish.

    I hope that makes things clearer.

    Sometimes, we lurk.

    Josh

    Can you please write a book about the history of Sierra with all sorts of juicy info and sell it as an e-book or whatever?

  • @Josho said: Al Lowe did a tremendous amount on Freddy Pharkas, and, as with all his games, he was primarily responsible for it. He did the original design document (which isn't the one on his website; that's a much later iteration, close to the final version if not THE final version); subsequent versions of the design were worked out between the two of us, and he always had final say -- which is exactly how it should've been, given that he was by far more experienced than I was, and his name was going to be first and foremost on the box and in the marketing. I was to receive the benefit of an overseer on my first game, ensuring an expected level of quality, and his name on the box would guarantee that it would sell even if I didn't perform.

    Most of the puzzles and plot were his, particularly in the first half of the game. He wrote a little of the text and a little of the music. Parts of the finished game, we designed together, some large parts were virtually all his and some smaller parts were virtually all mine. I conceived and wrote the ballads (based on the backstory that Al had written), 95% or more of the text, gags, dialogue and narration, fleshed out the characters and locations, designed and wrote the demo, wrote about 95% of the manual, did all the producer duties, and directed the game on a daily basis. Al oversaw everything, checking it all frequently to see that things met his standards and making fine-tuning changes all along the way.

    There were many, many things I wanted to do with the game, and Al let me do almost all of them, even when he was uncertain of the direction I was going. I don't recall him "flexing his muscles" very often (I can only think of two broad areas where he regularly overruled me: I thought we REALLY didn't need puzzles involving both flatulence AND diarrhea in the same game, and I really don't like timed puzzles). But overall, Al was a flexible, generous, and thoughtful co-designer and guide, and I learned a great deal from him.

    Many, many months later, when they decided to make a CD version, Al did everything involved in the conversion: he cast and directed the voice work and supervised the whole process (I was busy working on SQ6 and trying, on a daily basis, to get Scott to co-design it, but his mind and spirit were far elsewhere by then).

    Al is as much Freddy's Dad as I am, perhaps more or less depending on where one feels the soul of a game comes from. He was in every way an absolutely formative and positive force, from start to finish.

    I hope that makes things clearer.

    Sometimes, we lurk.

    Josh

    Thanks for the clarification.

  • Now entering the forum, His Royal Majesty, King Graham I of Daventry!

    Welcome to the madness, Josh Mandel. Now can I talk to you about my taxes? :D

  • @JuntMonkey said: Sierra did do that kind of thing for marketing purposes. Josh Mandel posted at adventuregamers that he saw a review state that Freddy Pharkas was "Al Lowe at his purest" or something like that. Meanwhile Al Lowe had done virtually nothing on the game, with Mandel being the real designer.

    Thanks for the clarification Josh. I just knew that statements like the one above were absolutely not true.

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