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How should this game handle ingame deaths?

posted by Chyron8472 on - last edited - Viewed by 1.5K users

How should this KQ game approach dying? Specifically, should it have a "Restore/Restart/Quit" popup with only manual saves, should it have a "Try Again" popup with autosaves set right before encountering unavoidable death, or should it have less frequent autosaves and still require you to manually restore?

Do you have any different ideas?

193 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @chucklas said: except for giving the game a classic feel and increasing difficulty (which many people actually want.)

    It doesn't "increase difficulty". It increases the annoyance of having to constantly mash the save key every few minutes or lose some progress when you inevitably die in some strange way. Nothing about the game itself becomes harder, it just becomes more annoying.

    But either way, I already said let there be choice.

  • For you. There's a feigned sense of actual real danger to your playing experience if you haven't saved and you die. That's challenging. You're a lot more timid and nervous about things (which immerses you more into the experience) if you know you could die at any moment (as much as in real life) if you do something silly or make a mistake. If you die without a save it's like you actually died and you have to start over. It's very similar to any arcade game. If you're smart enough to save, however, you get to continue.

    The way I see it, if there's going to be a retry or autosave function then why have deaths at all? That sense of danger is completely gone and it turns into a simple puzzle game.

    So, make it a choice.

  • @MusicallyInspired said: For you. There's a feigned sense of actual real danger to your playing experience if you haven't saved and you die. That's challenging. You're a lot more timid and nervous about things (which immerses you more into the experience) if you know you could die at any moment (as much as in real life) if you do something silly or make a mistake. If you die without a save it's like you actually died and you have to start over. It's very similar to any arcade game. If you're smart enough to save, however, you get to continue.

    The way I see it, if there's going to be a retry or autosave function then why have deaths at all? That sense of danger is completely gone and it turns into a simple puzzle game.

    It's less a sense of danger for me and more a sense of "God, I am sick of hitting save after every other step I take." The way deaths worked in 302 was perfect for me.

  • You don't need to save after every step you take. Just save after you've done something important, i.e. after you've done something that increases your score, or before attempting something that might be risky. If the only progress you've lost is walking around and looking at things, then you haven't actually lost any progress at all. And if you do lose significant progress, it isn't actually that bad to replay it. It goes much faster after you've already figured out what to do.

  • @thesporkman said: You don't need to save after every step you take. Just save after you've done something important, i.e. after you've done something that increases your score, or before attempting something that might be risky. If the only progress you've lost is walking around and looking at things, then you haven't actually lost any progress at all. And if you do lose significant progress, it isn't actually that bad to replay it. It goes much faster after you've already figured out what to do.

    It's still a mostly unnecessary annoyance. The only tangible difference between auto-saving after you solve a puzzle and manual save is that you have to poke around on a save menu constantly with manual saves.

  • @SHODANFreeman said: It's still a mostly unnecessary annoyance. The only tangible difference between auto-saving after you solve a puzzle and manual save is that you have to poke around on a save menu constantly with manual saves.

    I kind of agree, actually. An experienced adventure gamer will automatically save as a sort of mechanical Pavlovian reaction anyway. It's not really a matter of skill or strategy. It's like periodically saving a text document you're working on in case something screws up; it's just kind of a good idea, and a prudent person knows to do so. If the games were really meant to be cruel and difficult, they wouldn't let you save at all, like their arcade and action game contemporaries that would send you all the way back to the beginning if you died. Most other game genres have check points and autosaves now, and those seem like a reasonable thing to include in adventure games too. Since King's Quest is a nostalgic franchise, and fans expect nostalgic gameplay from it, though, I think Telltale should definitely give the player a choice.

  • I wouldn't mind autosaves as long as they didn't kick in RIGHT before you die. That's basically a "retry" which makes deaths minor annoyances and pointless. I wouldn't mind if it autosaved once you reached a new area (not a new screen, a new area) or maybe after you receive a point or find an important item or something.

  • @MusicallyInspired said: I wouldn't mind autosaves as long as they didn't kick in RIGHT before you die. That's basically a "retry" which makes deaths minor annoyances and pointless. I wouldn't mind if it autosaved once you reached a new area (not a new screen, a new area) or maybe after you receive a point or find an important item or something.

    Which is why I absolutely HATED the newer Tomb Raider games and the Uncharted Games. If I screw up and the game only backs me up like ten seconds then it takes all the pressure off me to play properly.

    As opposed to something like Demon's Souls where if you screw up you could potentially lose hours of hard work.

  • @wilco64256 said: Which is why I absolutely HATED the newer Tomb Raider games and the Uncharted Games. If I screw up and the game only backs me up like ten seconds then it takes all the pressure off me to play properly.

    There's still plenty incentive to play properly. Anybody can finish an Uncharted game, but it still takes a lot of skill and effort to complete it on a high difficulty level and with decent "score". That, to me, is the best of both worlds.

  • @Radogol said: There's still plenty incentive to play properly. Anybody can finish an Uncharted game, but it still takes a lot of skill and effort to complete it on a high difficulty level and with decent "score". That, to me, is the best of both worlds.

    Yeah see I want a game to challenge me because it's a challenging game, not because I set the difficulty setting higher. There's a difference between a challenging game and a difficult game.

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