User Avatar Image

What they left out of the 3rd edition of the King's Quest Companion...

posted by Akril15 on - last edited - Viewed by 793 users

This is a repeat of a post I made on another forum several months ago, but I thought I'd post it again here, since some things have changed since I made the first post.

As some of you may know, there are several versions of The King's Quest Companion. The first one covers KQ1-4, the second one was expanded to include KQ5, the third added KQ6, and the fourth (and last) one covers KQ1-7. However, because of the vast amount of material KQ6 contained, one of the sections present in the first and second editions had to be removed from the third edition.

This section was called "An Encyclopedia of Daventry", and it discusses the various people, creatures, lands and entities found throughout the series, often describing their real-life origins. However, there is also a lot of "embellishment" added to the descriptions of some of the original characters by the author, and some of this embellishment is so bizarre that when I first saw some examples from the encyclopedia on the KQ Wiki, I thought that some mischievous fan was adding this info as a joke. However, I now own the 2nd edition of the KQC, and I can verify that not only are the pages where the 2nd edition of the KQC are accurate, but they're copied almost verbatim.

Here are a few of the more..."interesting" entries that I discovered:


From the entry on snow leopards:
[quote][...]Rosella speculates that the leopard might be more than just a bodyguard. It seems that fairies must spend a day each week in the form of some animal. Rosella thinks Genesta may become a female snow leopard and the regal beast she saw in Genesta's Ivory Tower is her animal husband.[/quote]
Er...o-kaaay...
(Note: The encyclopedia's entry on fairies repeats the "fairies must spend one day in the form of an animal" fact.)


And speaking of Genesta (this text is from the wiki -- it's supposed to be an actual fairy tale, but I haven't been able to find it):
[quote]Genesta once took a young boy from his parents, a foolish king and queen. Genesta promised to return the boy someday, but said they would not see him again until he was all covered with fur. She called the boy Mannikin because of his small size. He grew up to go on many adventures, aided by the good fairy Genesta. Years, later when Mannikin returned from the North Pole, Genesta arrived in a chariot drawn by eagles, bearing with her Mannikin's parents. Mannikin was wearing a fur coat, thus Genesta's promise was fulfilled.[/quote]
Wow...makes me wonder if Lolotte got the idea of stealing Edgar from Genesta.


From the pirates' entry:
[quote]All the pirates but one are now dead, the victims of a great storm spell cast upon them by Prince Alexander some weeks after his return home. The lone survivor washed up on the coast of Llewdor babbling of shipmates being consumed by sharks and others swallowed by a great squid after being crushed in its tentacles. The unfortunate man also kept whimpering a word that sounded something like "Cthulhu," but his mind had been shattered by the experience and he only continued to chatter incoherently.[/quote]
Is it just me, or does this story seem a bit...well, out of place?
"Well Mother and Father, I'd really love to spend more time with you after spending nearly 18 years as a slave to an evil wizard, but right now I've got to go sic an Elder God on some rude pirates who stole my things before they brought me here. Bye!"


On Queen Icebella:
[quote]Her consort is the changeling and werewolf, Sir Greywolf.[/quote]
What is it with the implied bestiality in this Encyclopedia!?


A bit of information from Cassima's entry (remember, this is before KQ6 was made):
[quote][Derek Karlavaegan] also mentions that Alexander and Cassima have communicated since their meeting [in Mordack's castle], but how, or where or when is unknown. Nothing is at it appears, and we know too little.[/quote]
How conveniently vague...
Other entries in the encyclopedia go on to say that during these "communications", Cassima told Alexander about Dink (the unseen monster named "Sam" is apparently his brother), the blue beast in the castle (he is somehow related to Dink, "although whether he is made from parts of Dink or his tissue is not clear"), how her locket wound up in the Roc's nest (Mordack flew with her to his castle "in the wings of a giant bird", and she dropped the locket on the way). Too bad she never told him something like...say, the location of the Kingdom of the Green Isles?


On vampires:
[quote]Derek believes vampires may be descended from the lizardfolk and not supernatural at all, having powers similar to the bat and chameleon (other species that may have descended from the lizardfolk).[/quote]
I probably shouldn't have looked up the lizardfolk's page after reading this, but I did...
[quote]The lizardfolk are [a] reptilian race that had owned the earth, and roamed the stars before the evolution of mammals that would become humanity. They crawled out of the swamps to raise gargantuan cities and ruled the stars for untold millions of years. Their race died out, disappearing into oblivion, victims of arcane sorceries from beyond the Multiverse itself. The insane and incomprehensible magics (the very sounds which cannot be conceived nor reproduced by humans) that destroyed the lizards may exist still. [/quote]
...I got nothing.


According to An Encyclopedia of Daventry, the winged horse in KQ2 is indeed Pegasus, who was born from the blood of the gorgon Medusa after she was killed by Perseus. However, this raises the quandary of how Medusa is alive in KQ3. A look at her page in the Omni reveals that:
[quote]There are hints that this Medusa is the same one Perseus killed. How she came to be alive again is unknown.[/quote]
No kidding.

51 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Is the Mannikan and Genesta story an actual fairy tale? I did some searches on the names, but couldn't find anything.



    The fairy tale is called 'Heart of Ice' it seems;

    here


    looked at the KQC 2nd Edition, and it doesn't say that the shape-shifting is from English fairy stories -- it just says that they "come from and dwell in the Land of Faerie". I've read a lot of mythology and traditional fantasy stories, but I've never encountered the shape-shifting concept before. It is interesting, though.

    It might not be English fairies specifically, but Wikipedia mentions it a bit more;


    Shapeshifting

    British and Irish
    "Fairies, witches, and wizards were all noted for their shapeshifting ability. Not all fairies could shapeshift, and some were limited to changing their size, as with the spriggans, and others to a few forms and other fairies might have only the appearance of shape-shifting, through their power, called "glamour," to create illusions.[38]

    Ya, its interesting alot of peter spear's stranger ideas in the book actually originate from obscure fairy tales! Though he tossed in a few modern fantasy references as well!

    "Well Mother and Father, I'd really love to spend more time with you after spending nearly 18 years as a slave to an evil wizard, but right now I've got to go sic an Elder God on some rude pirates who stole my things before they brought me here. Bye!"

    Well in the book IIRC, he also took the time to write a couple of books on magic, taught magic at the university, and took time to explore Mordack's castle!

    Hmm, IIRC, one of the novels, The Floating Castle, had something just as strange! One passage said that Alexander had been on a journey away from Daventry, for something like six months to a year?
    Too bad she never told him something like...say, the location of the Kingdom of the Green Isles?
    Interesting point!

    It begs the question though, if they were in communication, did she know where the location was of the Kingdom of the Green Isles in relation to where Alexander lived? Without geographical information it might have been difficult for her to say, where exactly she lived!

    Remember she didn't really even know where Mordack's Island was in relation to her homeland!

  • @Valiento said: The fairy tale is called 'Heart of Ice' it seems;

    here




    It might not be English fairies specifically, but Wikipedia mentions it a bit more;


    Shapeshifting



    Ya, its interesting alot of peter spear's stranger ideas in the book actually originate from obscure fairy tales! Though he tossed in a few modern fantasy references as well!



    Well in the book IIRC, he also took the time to write a couple of books on magic, taught magic at the university, and took time to explore Mordack's castle!

    Hmm, IIRC, one of the novels, The Floating Castle, had something just as strange! One passage said that Alexander had been on a journey away from Daventry, for something like six months to a year?

    Interesting point!

    It begs the question though, if they were in communication, did she know where the location was of the Kingdom of the Green Isles in relation to where Alexander lived? Without geographical information it might have been difficult for her to say, where exactly she lived!

    Remember she didn't really even know where Mordack's Island was in relation to her homeland!



    KQ6 makes it seem like the Green Isles are pretty much completely isolated from the rest of the world, so it would make sense for her not to know WHERE her homeland was, at least in relation to Daventry or anywhere else. Even in KQ5, the Green Isles is implied to be remote; Cassima thinks she's HEARD of Daventry--something legendary.

    The idea of Mordack taking Cassima to his Castle by them riding on a bird would be a nice explanation for her locket landing in the Roc's nest.

    Also, something I find interesting: Quite a few people (the Hermit, Crispin, Madame Mushka) seem to know about Mordack, at the very least, that he's a powerful and evil dude. I wonder how--Did he terrorize the land of Serenia at one point? Did he live there?

    I also always wondered who the Hermit was. What his story was. Maybe he was an elderly John the Wanderer.

  • The idea of Mordack taking Cassima to his Castle by them riding on a bird would be a nice explanation for her locket landing in the Roc's nest.



    In KQ5, I think she vaguely mentions she lost it somewhere, when she was brought to Mordack's castle, but never specifcally mentions how! So ya the explanation does work.

    KQ6 makes it seem like the Green Isles are pretty much completely isolated from the rest of the world, so it would make sense for her not to know WHERE her homeland was, at least in relation to Daventry or anywhere else. Even in KQ5, the Green Isles is implied to be remote; Cassima thinks she's HEARD of Daventry--something legendary.

    Ya, but you know what's stranger? She may not have known how to get back to where she was from, but apparently Crispin knew where to send her back! KQ5 nor KQC explains how he knew where send her back though.

    really like the latest edition. I never read the earlier ones. And based on the examples cited, I think lack of space may not have been the only reason the Encyclopedia was removed. A much more agreeable read this way.

    I'm pretty sure its mainly for lack of space, considering that KQ6 actually added like another 220 pages to the book or so (with both the novel, and the hintbook section in the back). 2nd Edition and 3rd Edition have the same number of pages more or less (slightly more because of the rather huge KQ6 strategy section), and same paper stock.

    4th Edition switched to really cheap paper stock... very thin, can and does fall apart easily.... Just so they could add in another 150 pages of chapters, and still fit in into a book as thick as 3rd edition. But really the binding in that edition is crap.

    Actually, you'll find quite a bit of the King's Quest specific material from the encyclopedia (referring to family, or important details in the game) is mentioned in novels or related chapters. Some material specific to minor characters sometimes shows up in the novels as well, like the whole "Medusa" may be the same medusa that Perseus killed, is suggested in the KQ3 novel (However this relates to an explanation on how to deal with her).

    All that stuff about Alexander making trips to various places for whatever magical reasons, like going to Mordack's castle, or teaching at the academy? Those are also mentioned other chapters such as the Sorcery of Old and the Iconomancy chapter. The Cthulu spell is mentioned in one of those chapters as well (though not specifically that Alexander had used it on the pirates).

    The encyclopedia just broke it down, a bit more.

    Interesting enough, the KQ7 novel in 4th edition actually makes a reference or two to the encyclopedia chapter. There is a comment that Valanice stood infront of the door to Rosella's bedroom with a sword; in order to keep Graham from taking their daughter to the dragon! That's taken from either the Valanice or Rosella articles in the encyclopedia!

    Quite a bit stuff from the encyclopedia (such as Pegasus and the name of the monastery in Kolyma) also made it into the King's Quest Collection, trivia program via Josh Mandel (which was published some time after the 3rd Edition)!

    Beyond that the encyclopedia was a great source of information, because it gives accounts many of the tales that inspired elements of the KQ series. It's a great resource for people who may not have knowledge of the more obscure references in the series! Like for example, how many people know about the 'Heart of Ice' tale, and that Genesta wasn't a creation by Roberta? Its very obscure, but by adding it in, he may have introduced people to it for the first time! This kind of information, about what inspired the KQ series, actually made 2/3s of the encyclopedia (if anything needs to be cut for space, that is is the kind of material to cut, since it is largely tangential to a book focusing on being a strategy guide).

    How about the fact that the names of Rosanella and Valanice, may be inspired by the characters from the fairy tale, "Rosanella", which was about a princess named Rosanella, and her mother Balanice! I'm pretty sure that's more than a coincidence! See here.

  • @Valiento said: The fairy tale is called 'Heart of Ice' it seems;

    here


    Thank you very much! And wow, all these years and I had no idea that Genesta was based on a pre-existing fairy tale character. Amazing.

    It might not be English fairies specifically, but Wikipedia mentions it a bit more;

    Shapeshifting
    Ah, I see. I should have said that I'd heard about fairies and other related magic entities having the capability of shape-shifting, but the KQC's statement that fairies (in the KQ universe) must spend one day a week in the form of an animal is a concept I haven't come across in any traditional fairy tales yet.

    Well in the book IIRC, he also took the time to write a couple of books on magic, taught magic at the university, and took time to explore Mordack's castle!

    Hmm, IIRC, one of the novels, The Floating Castle, had something just as strange! One passage said that Alexander had been on a journey away from Daventry, for something like six months to a year?
    Wow...and wasn't the gap between KQ4 and 5 just one year? That Alexander is one incredibly busy young man.

    It begs the question though, if they were in communication, did she know where the location was of the Kingdom of the Green Isles in relation to where Alexander lived? Without geographical information it might have been difficult for her to say, where exactly she lived!
    Actually -- remember how in KQ6, Alexander tells Alhazred that Cassima invited him to visit her? The problem is that in KQ5, she doesn't invite him, he asks her if he can visit her kingdom (in the second sentence he speaks to her). If they were communicating between games, perhaps she could have formally invited him...maybe.

    Ya, but you know what's stranger? She may not have known how to get back to where she was from, but apparently Crispin knew where to send her back! KQ5 nor KQC explains how he knew where send her back though.
    Hmm...since Crispin is the only one who apparently knew where the Isles were, maybe he was teleporting letters between Alexander and Cassima but unfortunately forgot how to transport other people to different locations after sending Graham and his family home? This is making for some promising fan fiction material here...

    How about the fact that the names of Rosanella and Valanice, may be inspired by the characters from the fairy tale, "Rosanella", which was about a princess named Rosanella, and her mother Balanice! I'm pretty sure that's more than a coincidence!
    I was pretty astonished when I found that story. I guess the statement that everything in the KQ games has a connection to a myth or a fairy tale is far from exaggeration.

    I was wondering where Roberta might have heard of these obscure stories in the pre-Internet age, but then I realized that the Mannikan/Mannikin story and the Rosanella story are both found in Andrew Lang's Green Fairy Book (first published in 1892). They're even both by the same author. (And wow, the story about the white snake [the same thing that Crispin gives Graham in KQ5] is in there too!)

  • I was wondering where Roberta might have heard of these obscure stories in the pre-Internet age, but then I realized that the Mannikan/Mannikin story and the Rosanella story are both found in Andrew Lang's Green Fairy Book (first published in 1892). They're even both by the same author. (And wow, the story about the white snake [the same thing that Crispin gives Graham in KQ5] is in there too!)


    Interesting observations I had actually noticed the Green book connection between Heart of Ice and Rosanella. Didn't know about the white snake though!

    I've been thinking more about Crispin though. The KQC suggests that Crispin may or may not be a persona he has adopted and that he may or may not have once been Merlin and that Cedric is Archemedes.

    Well in KQ6 we learn of yet another mysterious wizard which some think died, others think poofed himself into an Aardvark. He was the only wizard he land knew! There is also a myth that the Isle o Wonders was created by a wizard according to the Guidebook, but I'm digressing.

    Could it be possible that Haroun alRashid was just another persona for Crispin? He neither died nor shapeshifted. This could explain why he knew of he Islands location!

    In KQC the court wizard (Haroun?) knew were Serenia was, and sent Derek there from the Green Isles!

    If the wizard is Crispin/Haroun, it would certainly explain why he would both know where Green Isles is, and also why he would know where Serenia is!

    but the KQC's statement that fairies (in the KQ universe) must spend one day a week in the form of an animal is a concept I haven't come across in any traditional fairy tales yet

    As for the one week thing, I'll look into it, there must be some kind of inspiration behind it. Most of Peter Spear's material has something inspiring it. If I discover anything I'll post my findings. It would be funny though, if it turned out to be another idea taken from the Green book, or the other fairy books by that author!

    Edit: Well, I did come across this reference to a 14th c. french fairy tale, something about the Legend of the Fairy Melusine.

    She was a fairy who was married to a human. She would transform into a half-serpent creature one day out of every week, in this case because of a curse.

    It certainly seems to share similarties to the rules mentioned about fairies in KQC, and could be the inspiration for the idea (there may be similar stories elsewhere though). See here.

    Edit 2: Apparently, the idea of shape shifting Snow Leopards is a common theme in ancient myths... So Peter could have gotten that idea from assortment of stories. See here, for more information!

    Seriously don't underestimate Peter Spear, or the various KQ authors for dredging up obscure Fairy Tales and sources of myth!

  • @Valiento said: Seriously don't underestimate Peter Spear, or the various KQ authors for dredging up obscure Fairy Tales and sources of myth!



    Speaking of that, I find it rather hard to believe that at least one of the writing duo known as Kenyon Morr wasn't aware of this little ditty when Kingdom of Sorrow was written.

  • Fascinating, thanks for that!

    Hmm, we should start a thread, just on trying to track KQ characters/events/etc, and the myths they are connected to!

  • @Valiento said: Fascinating, thanks for that!

    Hmm, we should start a thread, just on trying to track KQ characters/events/etc, and the myths they are connected to!


    I believe the KQ Omnipedia has already noted this, but the Magic Fruit which Rosella seeks out in order to save Graham's life in KQ4 is taken from the Tale of the Three Princes in the 1001 Arabian Nights, wherein a prince, one of three brothers, saves the life of a dying princess with a magic fruit.

    (Funny thing: there was a TV miniseries version of the Arabian Nights about a decade ago, which featured this story... but in the TV version, the prince must save his own father's life, instead of saving a princess.)

  • The Magic Fruit is actually devised from several legends.

    The Tree of Life (see KQ4 AGI?), from the Garden of Eden (not to be confused with the tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil). It is also connected to the magical fruit of the Garden of Hesperides, guarded by the giant serpent!. Of course, the fact that it is a serpent, could also roughly be connected back to the the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, in a round about way!

    Wow...and wasn't the gap between KQ4 and 5 just one year? That Alexander is one incredibly busy young man.


    Well, 'nearly a year' to a 'year' depending on the source.

  • Looking back at the Narnia books, in The Magician's Nephew there's a magical tree in a walled garden, on which grow silver apples. The tree is guarded by a phoenix nesting in its branches. The book's hero, Digory, gains a fruit from the tree and gives it to his seriously ill mother, who is healed by eating it.

    There's also a Golden Apple from the Tree of Life in The White Snake, a story in The Green Fairy Book (the same tale, in fact, which provided the magical white snake, the talking-to-animals motif, and even the helpful Ant King seen in KQ5). The hero of The White Snake is told by a princess that he must bring her such an apple if he hopes to win her hand; with the help of animals he befriended earlier, he succeeds in the quest, wins the princess's heart, and becomes king.

    The Green Fairy Book is very interesting, in fact, and seems to have provided a LOT of inspiration for KQ.

    For instance, in its tale Prince Narcissus and the Princess Potentilla the hero uses a magic ring, which when worn grants invisibility, to court a princess without being observed by an evil enchanter, who also covets her hand. This may well have inspired the magic ring of invisibility in KQ1. (As in KQ1, and most unlike the One Ring in Lord of the Rings, this ring is not malevolent in any way.)

    There's also Prince Featherhead and the Princess Celandine, whose heroine hails from the Summer Islands. Possibly this was an inspiration for the Green Isles, home of Princess Cassima, first mentioned in KQ5.

Add Comment