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What you'd like to see in TTG's Kings Quest (merged threads)

posted by Anakin Skywalker on - last edited - Viewed by 676 users

I've noticed in KQ games--ESPECIALLY KQ5--you get a lot of interesting things, both in the art and story, which are never explained but nonetheless entice. For example, look at the shot of the Roc carrying off Graham:
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Note in the foreground there is a primitive village. It's there and it's made clear, yet we never learn anything about it, or visit it. It's just there to entice the eyes and get you wondering.

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Or this snowy vista. Endless miles of snow lay beyond, perhaps kingdoms of ice and caves among the mountains in the distance--but we don't know. We aren't told. It's just there.

Then you have some of the characters. We never learn much about Mordack, but he comes off as a very powerful, dark, evil fellow right out of a pulp fantasy story. We don't know all that much about him, but we can see he's clearly obsessed with the occult, with snakes, and with some kind of cult (note his Satanic looking altar in the last photo ). None of this is explained to us, but that makes it all the more interesting.
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Or, look at these scenes when Graham is in the boat.
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Dozens of rocky islands are seen far off in the horizon, but we never visit them, and we're never told anything about them. And it leads the mind to wonder--what IS on those islands? What creature or people reside there? Your mind can run wild with speculation.

I think that a TT King's Quest game should have little things like this--places we can't explore that are just at the edge of the screen, far away places that tantalize the imagination, interesting characters who we don't learn the whole story of--Because it allows you to have things left up to your own imagination, to dream up your own stories and backstories about these characters and locations.

It leaves you hungrier for more--and such things have sustained the fan community for years. For example, single, cryptic message about something called the Black Cloak Society kept fans' imaginations fired for nearly 20 years, without us ever being told much of anything about this society other than it's name. Less is more in King's Quest, and in KQ, all of these lands, and characters are left purposely unexplained, and are never returned to, never explored in full, and it serves a good purpose:

It entices you, the same way a scantily clad woman is enticing and intriguing to the eye without revealing everything; It makes your mind wonder, and lights your imagination up. If you're told everything about a character or, are allowed to explore every crevice of a land, you lose the ability to imagine and dream yourself, and you become less an active participant in this wild, alien fantasy world and more a mere observer with everything about it being spoonfed to you.

81 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Anakin, you should really check out this team. They're making a game that seems to adhere to your design philosophy. I think you guys would really click.

    http://www.tsl-game.com/

  • @Lambonius said: Anakin, you should really check out this team. They're making a game that seems to adhere to your design philosophy. I think you guys would really click.

    http://www.tsl-game.com/



    OMG. This is lyke...EXACTLY rite up my alley!
    I'll download the game later. I have to go to Hot Topic to get some new eyeliner and some bandages to cover up the scars on my wrist. But this game looks mad kewl! I can almost...relate...to it.

  • SO....MUCH....POTENT....SARCASM.....*faints*

  • @MusicallyInspired said: How is that frustrating? It's an adventure game. It's supposed to be difficult. The better the puzzles the better the game. More obstacles means more puzzles; more game!



    Yeah, it's strange how the adventure game genre in recent times (anything later than the 1990s is 'recent times' for me :D) has seen so many extremely easy games... even easier than most games in other genres often.
    So that's a bit strange when considering that back in the 'golden era' of adventure gaming, this genre was known for having very difficult games, oftentimes much more difficult than a big percentage of games in other genres.

    Adventure games have taken a 180 degree turn when it comes to difficulty, it would seem.

  • Maybe that's why adventures died. Developers started giving gamers what they thought they wanted; easier puzzles. Eventually gamers got bored with them and moved on to more challenging genres. Now we've come full circle but we're skipping a step and going straight to easy puzzles this time....are we trying to kill adventures faster?

  • One thing that seems to be happening now is adventure games, being so easy, are starting to attract a new audience - people that mostly play casual games :eek:

    And for many of these people, the current level of difficulty is exactly what they want... which may pose the danger that developers will start aiming at this group instead and keep making the games ridiculously easy :eek:

    I hope my little 'conspiracy theory' here is just me taking things too far, it would be horrible should that happen.

  • The public doesn't ever know what it wants. And when it does, a lot of times what it wants isn't good for it.

    A famous anecdote about the ancient Greek artist Polykleitos says it all.

    After having devised his canon of proportions for the ideal human figure, he created a sculpture in which to illustrate his "perfect" system. In order to prove the supremacy of his system, he asked the public to give him a list of things they wanted to see in their "ideal" sculpture, and then made a sculpture in which he included every one of their demands. He then revealed both sculptures together. The public adored one of them, and laughed at the other. Satisfied with this reaction, Polykleitos addressed the crowds and said, "ah, but the one you laugh at is the one that you have made, but the one you adore, I have made." Or something like that--I paraphrase.

    Anyway, the moral of the story is that people don't know shit. Artists have to make their own choices and follow their own ideas. Sometimes it's great, sometimes it sucks donkey balls.

    That said, Telltale had better include hard puzzles, large explorable areas, and deaths in their KQ game, or so help me I'll...;)

  • @Lambonius said: The public doesn't ever know what it wants. And when it does, a lot of times what it wants isn't good for it.

    That said, Telltale had better include hard puzzles, large explorable areas, and deaths in their KQ game, or so help me I'll...;)



    The irony of it all! Maybe it's because when developer's give what the fans want they don't do it right because it's not what they would have done. You only know what you do best well.

  • @Lambonius said: The public doesn't ever know what it wants. And when it does, a lot of times what it wants isn't good for it.

    A famous anecdote about the ancient Greek artist Polykleitos says it all.

    After having devised his canon of proportions for the ideal human figure, he created a sculpture in which to illustrate his "perfect" system. In order to prove the supremacy of his system, he asked the public to give him a list of things they wanted to see in their "ideal" sculpture, and then made a sculpture in which he included every one of their demands. He then revealed both sculptures together. The public adored one of them, and laughed at the other. Satisfied with this reaction, Polykleitos addressed the crowds and said, "ah, but the one you laugh at is the one that you have made, but the one you adore, I have made." Or something like that--I paraphrase.

    Anyway, the moral of the story is that people don't know shit. Artists have to make their own choices and follow their own ideas. Sometimes it's great, sometimes it sucks donkey balls.

    That said, Telltale had better include hard puzzles, large explorable areas, and deaths in their KQ game, or so help me I'll...;)



    Well yeah, if you take all of the desires of everyone of course you're going to end up with a massive pile of junk. :D Input is not inherently bad, and people do know what they enjoy. The problem is trying to please everyone.

  • I agree the MusicallyInspired hit the nail on the head.
    The big thing I noticed when playing Back to the Future Ep1 (my first Telltale game) is that it was very goal-oriented. Don't get me wrong I loved the game, and it kinda worked for BTTF, but in King's Quest you had on overall goal. You weren't told "do this, now do this" (well a little of that from Lolotte maybe)
    You had a large world to explore. You could do thing in different orders. You had to figure out the sub-goals for yourself. That's King's Quest.

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