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Was anyone else disappointed with Season 3's ending? (SPOILERS)

posted by Superninfreak on - last edited - Viewed by 1.3K users

Let me just start by saying that while I haven't posted much, I love Sam and Max. Some episodes (S1E4, S1E5, and S2E4 especially) were just brilliant. I also loved Season 3.

Until I got to the ending that is.

I had two major problems with it.

1. Max went completely out of character. After Max has been built up as evil for the entire series, it's not believable that he would die just so Sybil wouldn't have to give birth outside of a hospital. I don't think Max would even care if Sybil died, honestly.

2. Girl Stinky died despite the fact that she's alive in the future. This was a pretty glaring plot hole.


The worst part about it though is that I can SEE a brilliant ending in Season 3. Had they not made those mistakes, I would want that to be the finale of everything Sam and Max, just because of how beautiful an ending it would have been.

#1 could have easily been fixed if it were Sam who Max died for instead of Sybil. Sam is the only person I think Max would die for, and it would still get across the point that Max isn't completely irredeemable.

So yeah, thoughts?

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  • The ending definitely could have been better

  • @Fly said: I saw the point of the scene as showing that Max is just as capable of acts of random goodness and kindness as he is of random evil and mayhem. He's all id - I don't buy that he rationalised the act at all. He just arbitrarily decided to Save Sybil, and so for that moment all he could think about was saving Sybil, and it came from the same thought processes that lead to him arbitrarily deciding to torture someone. Max isn't good or bad, or even selfish or unselfish. He's just impulse.

    There's a little bit of this characterisation in the comics, in Beast from the Cereal Isle (which I'd guess is the main influence on Devil's Playhouse). Right at the end of the story, a kid falls off the Beast, and Max, without breaking conversation, catches him and sets him back on the ride. He's not really paying attention to what he's doing - he just instinctively decided to help the kid, and so he did.



    This is a good explanation, actually.

    I was still disappointed by that part of the ending, but your interpretation helps.

  • Well, ended on a Deus Ex Machina, which isn't necessarily inappropriate for the series. The whole credit sequence forcing us to accept that the Max we've followed up to now is truly dead -- that was a deeper punch in the gut than one would expect from a so-far comical series. A good Season 4 might make up for it, but lacking that Sam and Max is closing on a sour note that recolors the entire trilogy.

  • @enkephalin07 said: Well, ended on a Deus Ex Machina, which isn't necessarily inappropriate for the series. The whole credit sequence forcing us to accept that the Max we've followed up to now is truly dead -- that was a deeper punch in the gut than one would expect from a so-far comical series. A good Season 4 might make up for it, but lacking that Sam and Max is closing on a sour note that recolors the entire trilogy.



    TTG injected a heart-crushing downer of a dramatic ending into absolutely the wrong game series. It was terribly out of character for the Sam & Max games and fiction, and to be honest, I'm very wary about playing any future TTG S&M games.

  • I thought the ending rocked.

  • I wasn't disappointed with the ending's theme itself. Both Sam and Max received quite a bit of character development throughout this season, Max in particular going through the usual "with great power comes great responsibility" deal. A sacrificial ending seemed fitting. Unfortunately, it still seemed a bit shaky and way too deus ex machina, even for Sam & Max. Maybe it was the lack of a climactic final showdown, what with the 'main villain' doing a complete 180 right at the very end. I dunno, I just felt better about Episode 4's ending, before Max became all monstery, of course. Seemed much more in line with Sam and Max in general.

  • Some of my favorite bits in the Sam & Max comics are when Sam and Max are super threatened or get separated and lose each other (both happen a few times in Monkeys Violating the Heavenly Temple, Auntie Alice genuinely freaked me out in On the Road, and obviously Max getting zapped into oblivion in Bad Day on the Moon is the textbook example), and most of the stories end with crazy deus ex machinas (the cult leader spontaneously combusting saves them from volcano sacrifice in Monkeys Violating the Heavenly Temple, Squiddo our octopus pal comes out of the sea and saves them from the pirates in On the Road, the Rubber Pants Commandos crash through the ceiling in Night of the Gilded Heron Shark to save Sam & Max from Mack Salmon, to name a few) -- when there are bits of contrast like that, of genuine fear or genuine loss, it makes all the regular flippant Sam & Max stuff resonate a lot more strongly to me, and the deus ex machinas are just trademark Sam & Max storytelling -- so I was beyond pleased that we could close the season out with a big version of both those things.

    It felt like a valid choice to me since, at least in my experience playing it, the season ended up dealing a lot with the nature of Sam & Max's friendships, and accidentally with their personalities underneath their veneer (303 for whatever faults it had, I thought did a great job with that, with the first half of the episode focusing on Sam without Max, and the second half including a lot of Max having to be self reliant for the first time). I don't know how on purpose that was, but it ended up coming up again and again in the season, so closing on a big version of that felt like an okay thing to do. I think we expected it to play as more over the top/gratuitous than it did, though, as a lot of people were bothered by it either positively (as in, were genuinely emotionally effected by it, which wasn't expected*), or negatively (felt that we didn't earn it**, or that it was inappropriate, or a cop out), but I'm still proud that we made the choice to go for it.


    * but which is okay!

    ** also a totally fair opinion to have!

  • @Terrible Tony said: TTG injected a heart-crushing downer of a dramatic ending into absolutely the wrong game series. It was terribly out of character for the Sam & Max games and fiction, and to be honest, I'm very wary about playing any future TTG S&M games.



    That was what made it so powerful and moving. I'm sorry, maybe you just can't take emotional storytelling, but it was beautiful.

    @Terrible Tony said: Let me just start by saying that while I haven't posted much, I love Sam and Max. Some episodes (S1E4, S1E5, and S2E4 especially) were just brilliant. I also loved Season 3.

    Until I got to the ending that is.

    I had two major problems with it.

    1. Max went completely out of character. After Max has been built up as evil for the entire series, it's not believable that he would die just so Sybil wouldn't have to give birth outside of a hospital. I don't think Max would even care if Sybil died, honestly.

    2. Girl Stinky died despite the fact that she's alive in the future. This was a pretty glaring plot hole.


    The worst part about it though is that I can SEE a brilliant ending in Season 3. Had they not made those mistakes, I would want that to be the finale of everything Sam and Max, just because of how beautiful an ending it would have been.

    #1 could have easily been fixed if it were Sam who Max died for instead of Sybil. Sam is the only person I think Max would die for, and it would still get across the point that Max isn't completely irredeemable.

    So yeah, thoughts?

    The future changed. When does that happen? Time travel. I'm thinking Skunkape is from some distant future, and he used time travel to return to a point where the toys of power were still intact and obtainable. It's a theory, and it doesn't solve anything, but you know. A possibility. This caused most of the events of Season 3 when you think about it.

  • @Truskenite said: A sacrificial ending seemed fitting. Unfortunately, it still seemed a bit shaky and way too deus ex machina, even for Sam & Max.



    Yeah, I don't agree with that, for reasons that Jake has listed through. If anything a sacrificial ending may come too clichéd and maybe too subtle (any subtlety in a Sam and Max storyline is too much) as a whole, to be used in a game related to Sam and Max. I can also say the deus ex machina was implemented TOO good and actually did make sense, which is ironically a bad thing for THIS franchise, I guess.

    I had no big problems with the ending though. The whole main storyline just made more sense than the ones we sat through in previous seasons, except for the Girl Stinky subplot which was... Okay well, Girl Stinky subplot may be classified as a Sam&Max-ish storytelling, with all loose ends and weird revealizations. The problem with THAT is; it was like that UNINTENTIONALLY, and storyline itself was too busy getting adjusted into the sensible direction (yes, I just called a mermaid going out with a giant cockroach SENSIBLE) instead of using the joke opportunities OR better yet; going for creating joke opportunities -like Sam and Max always did for, like, uh, always.

  • @Superninfreak said: 2. Girl Stinky died despite the fact that she's alive in the future. This was a pretty glaring plot hole.



    I believe that Skunkape clones himself, girl stinky, and I'm guessing SamunMak; (possibly Sal) sometime in the future. I got that from this

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