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Top 3 Worst Episodes

posted by Duccen on - last edited - Viewed by 949 users

OK here goes!

1. Moai Better Blues
2. Reality 2.0
3. The Tomb of Sammun-Mak

(I like them all, but these are just a bit uninspired and dull at some points in my opinion)

63 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • 1) Moai better blues
    2) Mole, mob, meatball
    3) Freelance police (Cause we never got to play it, what a waste of life and hope)

    I should note that the alpha copy of Moai better blues that I had the privilege to play by accident while it was on gametap actually goes down by far as one of my FAVORITE episodes to date... the final released product on the other hand, well it sucks to the point of being my least favorite episode by far as well :mad:

    In short it had a few more puzzles that i thought were a lot of fun, Harder versions of the others, and quite a few good one liners that were removed for one reason or another... To this date i still wish they would release that alpha as a directors cut or something

  • @SubSidal said: Any that has the Soda Poppers in it...



    nah whats new beezlebub was pretty good

  • 1. The Mole, The Mob and The Meatball (Very short and very formulaic, even by Season 1 standards)
    2. Moai Better Blues (Absolutely nothing wrong with the episode, just not as outstanding as the rest of Season 2)
    3. They Stole Max's Brain (Both halves of the episode felt underdeveloped and the plot screeched to a halt. I also felt let down by Sal's role when I first played, although later episodes made up for it)

  • I've played every episode except S3E5 (haven't gotten to it), and I find it so odd that people would name any of S3E1-4. Especially the first two (Penal Zone, Sammun-Mak). S3 is an adventure game that FINALLY innovates within the genre. I didn't think Telltale had it in them until I played it. The powers freshen things up and change the way puzzles are solved, and the Twilight Zone presentation is outstanding.

    Sammun-Mak innovates even more with the mixed-up film reels. Really inventive storytelling/gameplay approach.

    What are the elements that you guys don't like about them?

  • @JuntMonkey said: I've played every episode except S3E5 (haven't gotten to it), and I find it so odd that people would name any of S3E1-4. Especially the first two (Penal Zone, Sammun-Mak). S3 is an adventure game that FINALLY innovates within the genre. I didn't think Telltale had it in them until I played it. The powers freshen things up and change the way puzzles are solved, and the Twilight Zone presentation is outstanding.

    Sammun-Mak innovates even more with the mixed-up film reels. Really inventive storytelling/gameplay approach.

    What are the elements that you guys don't like about them?



    The Psychic Toys were terrific and absolutely deserve to be praised as an excellent innovation in gameplay, as you say. But as the only gameplay mechanic that was fully developed, they were over-used and failed to make for consistently challenging games. The gameworlds lacked complexity, probably owing to the need to contrive situations amenable to the powers, so puzzle solutions became repetitive and obvious.

    303 is the best example of this, where there were five puzzles using the "silly putty" (sorry, I've forgotten the toys' real names). Because that mechanic required the placement of a specific image in the gameworld, and there were few extraneous images that might have required the player to think about the right course of action, the solutions became glaringly obvious. Ironically, that episode had another new gameplay mechanic, the noir dialog puzzles, which should also count as a cool innovation. But it was separated from the rest of the game as a distinct sequence. If the first two segments of 303 -- noir and museum -- had been integrated, it would have required more reasoning and creativity to figure out what to do.

    301 had similar problems due to the over-use of future vision. The early part of the game was great. But towards the end there was a segment that basically consisted of the following: a. visit a location that was mostly devoid of interactivity, b. solve a silly and contrived puzzle using future vision, c. listen to Sam, perhaps after using the Crimetron cop-out, explain its significance and tell you where to go next.

    302 was definitely the most interesting and challenging of the episodes. But 305, wherein you no longer have the toys, was a complete disaster puzzle-wise.

    It's because there were so many excellent aspects of TDP that its weaknesses are more disappointing. I really enjoyed the take-offs on different movie genres and the occasional homage to specific movies. Great writing, as usual for Telltale -- the "explanation" in 305 was brilliantly written (though it droned on a bit too long). Humor, as usual for Telltale -- another example from 305, there was a gag involving coinage that truly cracked me up. In the end, though, it boils down to my preference for games that entail exploration and challenging gameplay to those that seem overly focused on story and presentation. I just don't play games to have an on-screen narrator talk at me for extended lengths of time.

  • @thom-22 said: The Psychic Toys were terrific and absolutely deserve to be praised as an excellent innovation in gameplay, as you say. But as the only gameplay mechanic that was fully developed, they were over-used and failed to make for consistently challenging games. The gameworlds lacked complexity, probably owing to the need to contrive situations amenable to the powers, so puzzle solutions became repetitive and obvious.

    303 is the best example of this, where there were five puzzles using the "silly putty" (sorry, I've forgotten the toys' real names). Because that mechanic required the placement of a specific image in the gameworld, and there were few extraneous images that might have required the player to think about the right course of action, the solutions became glaringly obvious. Ironically, that episode had another new gameplay mechanic, the noir dialog puzzles, which should also count as a cool innovation. But it was separated from the rest of the game as a distinct sequence. If the first two segments of 303 -- noir and museum -- had been integrated, it would have required more reasoning and creativity to figure out what to do.

    In the end, though, it boils down to my preference for games that entail exploration and challenging gameplay to those that seem overly focused on story and presentation. I just don't play games to have an on-screen narrator talk at me for extended lengths of time.



    I am in complete agreement in preferring exploration and gameplay to a focus on a linear spoon-fed "story" and dialogue. What I don't see is why you think that S1-2 were any better from that standpoint. There was just as much dialogue, often a chore to sit through. The overall presentation was just a poor man's version of S3, with not as much care and resources put into it. The puzzles as a whole were marginally harder in S1-2, but I don't feel like it's that extreme. I've been fairly satisfied with S3's puzzles, and I've played well over 100 adventure games to completion since King's Quest, so I'm no slouch.

    The Tomb of Sammun-Mak itself is a bigger and better set piece/environment to explore than anything in the first two seasons. With a fully controllable and rotatable camera it would be outstanding for an adventure game.

    I think that, for me, part of why S3 is better is because I'm playing it on the PS3. Long dialogue sequences and dull cinematics are significantly more tolerable when you are relaxing on the couch rather than sitting upright with your hand on a mouse. Since the game is clearly designed first and foremost as a console game, this might be a big factor.

  • season 3 was overall the best season

  • @coolguy721 said: season 3 was overall the best season



    I believe Devil's Playhouse had the first symptoms of the illness BttF:tG suffers through (game design-wise), although they weren't as annoying or even apparent in it. Some levels didn't have Sam & Max's signature aspect of shitting out trivial dialouge/extra cutscene put into nearly every wrong combination of items/progress in the storyline. Some stages even had hotspot scooping, in which case you had to find THE hotspot of a puzzle in a room full of detailed, seemingly significant but unclickable stuff; while already having (and possibly knowing) the solution item in your inventory (if the puzzle includes such an item) so that you can advance forward. Hotspot scooping wasn't such a big aspect of gameplay in earlier seasons, in which case you still tried to find and guess the right hotspot to interact with, but you also had MANY other irrelevant hotspots that Sam and Max had comments on. Literally EVERYTHING seemed significant enough had AT LEAST an unique comment. Season 3 kind of lacked that and it surely affected its replay value. I played the first two seasons around 6 times each just to get everything wrong and get all the responses when 3 times was more than enough for any Season 3 episode; since all the jokes were kind of thrown into the main course of the storyline anyway. Although, they made it up by adding a tremendous value of different scenery each episode. Episode 304 had like 7 different scenes (8 if you count the different heights of Statue of Liberty, and 9 if you count the final boss). Still, this is something I realized a bit too late; I couldn't enjoy myself enough with the Season 3 because of this major flaw. It's still a great game but it's debatable that it's the best season.

  • @JuntMonkey said: I am in complete agreement in preferring exploration and gameplay to a focus on a linear spoon-fed "story" and dialogue. What I don't see is why you think that S1-2 were any better from that standpoint. There was just as much dialogue, often a chore to sit through. ... The puzzles as a whole were marginally harder in S1-2, but I don't feel like it's that extreme. I've been fairly satisfied with S3's puzzles, and I've played well over 100 adventure games to completion since King's Quest, so I'm no slouch.



    It's not just the individual difficulty of the puzzles. It's that in S1-2, the latter especially, one got the feeling that more of them were going on at the same time; that's mostly what I mean when I talk about complexity. We were usually exposed to elements (hotspots, inventory items, visual and spoken clues) of multiple puzzles in ways that didn't telescope their eventual use.

    @JuntMonkey said: The overall presentation was just a poor man's version of S3, with not as much care and resources put into it.

    I disagree with that characterization. While it is no doubt true Telltale had fewer resources to invest in the first two seasons, I think they were made with just as much attention to detail, albeit perhaps in a different way. The art style looked just as good, the environments were just as interesting. Season 3 was made with too much care for the non-interactive aspects of presentation.

    @JuntMonkey said: The Tomb of Sammun-Mak itself is a bigger and better set piece/environment to explore than anything in the first two seasons.

    The Tomb of Sammun-Mak was indeed bigger than the average S&M episode. More importantly, you had access to most of its locations fairly early and could move among them -- had to move among them -- to solve the puzzles. It's the exception, though. The other Season 3 episodes might have had as many locations as those of earlier seasons, but too often they were broken up into segments or you were funneled through them for limited purpose. The interactive complexity of a gameworld is more important than its size or location count.

    @JuntMonkey said: With a fully controllable and rotatable camera it would be outstanding for an adventure game.

    As a big fan of action-adventure games, I would certainly not be opposed to having four walls instead of three and a controllable chase camera. I don't see it as that big a deal, though, when the mode of interaction (if not the character movement) is still fundamentally point-and-click and rarely depends on precision or timing. I've always been pretty happy with Telltale's in-game camera work. (Have I read there are camera issues in BTTF? I've only played Ep. 1 so I'm not conversant with that series.)

    @JuntMonkey said: I think that, for me, part of why S3 is better is because I'm playing it on the PS3. Long dialogue sequences and dull cinematics are significantly more tolerable when you are relaxing on the couch rather than sitting upright with your hand on a mouse. Since the game is clearly designed first and foremost as a console game, this might be a big factor.

    Where is it written that the game is intended for consoles foremost? When I sit down to play a game, long dialogue sequences and dull cinematics are just as intolerable to me regardless of where I'm actually sitting.

  • So far I have found things to enjoy in all the episodes I have played... there have been elements that I have not liked.. but for the most part I have not hated entire episodes.

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