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Coin Box Puzzle

posted by Pirateguybrush on - last edited - Viewed by 4.7K users

Hey guys,

Loving PA2 so far, but I have to complain about the coin box puzzle. Without values on the coins, this puzzle is completely incomprehensable to those outside of the states, who don't immediately know the value of the coins. It forces the player to alt tab out, go and find the values, and keep refering back to them - and on top of that, it's a guessing game as to which one to pick, as the images mean little. In some situations this wouldn't be too bad, as it would just be another element to the puzzle. But in PA, I understood that the game gives you all the required information for a puzzle, and it's up to you to work it out from there.

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  • Same problem as the other non-US folks here, except from a slightly different direction. I know the penny, same as here, and I know there's dimes, quarters, nickels and dollars, so I figured out it was US money.

    My problem was - "Dime, ok, I think that's the 5 cent one."

    My illustration of the problem for you US folks - what's your equivalent of a florin?

  • @Chuck said: Whenever I encounter something about another country that I didn't know, I think "Huh. It would be interesting to learn more about that country."

    I don't think anyone is denying the fact that it's interesting to learn about other countries, just that having to load up the internet mid-game to find out the values of coins breaks the atmosphere and could have been handled better (the values could have been written on the coins or a key could have been provided, for example).

  • @Chuck said: Whenever I encounter something about another country that I didn't know, I think "Huh. It would be interesting to learn more about that country."

    Maybe that's an American-centric attitude too, though.

    Chuck, that's really not a professional way to treat your customers. My complaint was that Puzzle Agent is a game about puzzles, where you are given the information and rules needed to solve a puzzle, and then asked to solve it. It is jarring, and poor game design to include a puzzle that requires players to alt tab out and research online. If Puzzle Agent was more ARG-oriented, or included a built in encyclopedia or web browser as an integral gameplay mechanic, that would be different. But in the context of Puzzle Agent, this is a bad puzzle. I'll thank you to not make any more snide remarks, and learn how to take constructive criticism.

  • I was warned by a friend about the coin puzzle... so when I found it I was prepared for annoyance.

    I was already aware of the values of a dime, nickel & penny (through watching a lot of US TV shows), but the problem was the *other* coins present. Sure, one of them said 'quarter' on it, so I assumed it was 25c, but the other coin wasn't labelled at all, so I had to guess it was $1. I'd worked out the solution to the puzzle had to be 22c (not possible with a single coint) or $1... so I picked the coin that wasn't the quarter.

    Turned out I was right.

    Do the coins REALLY not have their value on them? Or is it just because we saw the "heads" side?

    Australian coins wouldn't have worked, showing the 'Heads' side, considering it's always the Queen. The shapes & sizes & colours may have helped, but not to anyone who isn't familiar with our coins.

    I think have 1c, 5c, 10c, 25c, $1 written on the coins would have helped non-Americans immensely.

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    puzzlebox Telltale Staff

    @Molokov said:
    Australian coins wouldn't have worked, showing the 'Heads' side, considering it's always the Queen.

    I like that the oldest Aussie coins have a young image of the Queen, and the newer coins have an older-looking profile. If you get a range of different years you can do like a numismatic timelapse of the Queen aging, jowls and all. :p

  • @Pirateguybrush said: Chuck, that's really not a professional way to treat your customers. My complaint was that Puzzle Agent is a game about puzzles, where you are given the information and rules needed to solve a puzzle, and then asked to solve it. It is jarring, and poor game design to include a puzzle that requires players to alt tab out and research online. If Puzzle Agent was more ARG-oriented, or included a built in encyclopedia or web browser as an integral gameplay mechanic, that would be different. But in the context of Puzzle Agent, this is a bad puzzle. I'll thank you to not make any more snide remarks, and learn how to take constructive criticism.


    But you're not my customer! I'm not a full-time employee of Telltale, so the only difference between me and any other forum poster is that I happen to have written dialogue for this game. (And my name is still in italics on this forum for whatever reason). It seems like I should be entitled to comment on the puzzles just as much as anyone else.* I'd respectfully thank you not to get upset when there's no reason to be.

    And there was absolutely nothing snide about my remark, and I don't see why people are taking offense at it (apart from the obvious fact that this is the internet). I don't believe there's any such thing as useless information, especially within the context of a puzzle game. I'd much rather be working on a puzzle with a real-world counterpart than something made up like imaginary species of fish or matching socks. If it were a puzzle about, say, Japanese currency, I'd be excited to be learning something I didn't know before. (And it probably would've kept me from short-changing people in Tokyo!) But this is a game set in the US.

    I've been playing on the iPad, so I can't speak to alt-tabbing out. But I disagree that it's a "bad puzzle;" I think it's the more interesting kind of puzzle -- taking real information that you've just learned (instead of arbitrary rules presented to you and immediately forgotten), and then applying them.

    I like being presented with stuff I don't know or am unfamiliar with. But several times I've seen players complain about games for being "too American" -- here, with the Sam & Max games, and as far back as Day of the Tentacle and Monkey Island 2. And I'm saying I don't get that. When I see European or Asian stuff in a game, I think "exotic;" I don't get offended or frustrated.

    Where I think it's silly is when the complaint turns to one of "Ugly Americanism." In other words, treating the game as if it were a standardized test where "cultural bias" is forbidden, and any game that relies on US-specific cultural idioms is decried as if it were some kind of modern imperialism. Sometimes a monkey wrench is just a goofy pun, chopping down a cherry tree is an excuse for a time-travel puzzle, and people in Minnesota use American coinage. I know I wouldn't have minded if the puzzle used Canadian money, and I had to go look up what a loony was.


    * In fact, when I was an employee, one of the most appealing things about the TTG forums was that they allowed open discussion between developers and fans that you don't get from larger studios. One of the things that quickly ruined that was when posters stopped acting like people united over an interest in games and started behaving like "customers" who were making complaints about a "product." Maybe that's inevitable whenever the size of the audience grows past a certain point, but it's still a shame.

    Regardless, I don't in any way speak for Telltale, and it shouldn't be inferred that I do.

  • Chuck, the TTG logo by your name implies that you are a TTG employee, and your comment came over as somewhat snarky - mainly because of the "Maybe that's an American-centric attitude" comment. Putting the values on the coins wouldn't have turned it into a math puzzle, as the puzzle isn't a math puzzle at all. It's a puzzle about binary code. I still maintain that the requirement for country-specific outside knowledge is unfair, and can't be assumed. As I said before, if it was more of an ARG-type game which regularly got you to research things online, that would be okay. But PA has established itself as a game where the puzzles are self-contained, so therefore a puzzle about American currency, or traditional Japanese clothing, or one that required you to understand how to count in German is out of context, and therefore a bad puzzle.

  • @Chuck said: And there was absolutely nothing snide about my remark, and I don't see why people are taking offense at it (apart from the obvious fact that this is the internet).

    Always blame it on the internet ;) what has poor ol' internet ever done to you! (wait.. on second thought, I could think of a bazillion things it has done to everybody..)

    Let me give you an example why some people think your comment looks snarly: "Maybe that's an American-centric attitude too, though." this part of your post will place your opinion in quite a different context, it no longer tells the reader "I love to learn new things about other cultures!", but instead people will interpret your opinion as being judgmental e.g. "you non-Americans don't want to learn anything about our culture!".

    Being labeled as telltale team member, people will automatically assume your comment represents the opinion of telltale games (even though you've just explained you're not). Therefore they feel their complaints are being disregarded (and will turn into an angry mob).

    @Chuck said: But several times I've seen players complain about games for being "too American"

    Not me, no siree! I like the American appeal the games have, it makes perfect sense to have USD in Scoggings. It's not the currency that makes me frown, but the implementation of the puzzle (I would probably dislike this puzzle even more if it were with unlabeled rupees because that wouldn't even make sense story wise).

    Lets say I agree to disagree on this one (otherwise this will drag on and on and on and on), and hope telltale will learn from this lengthy topic while making puzzle agent 3 :)

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