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If a non-adventure-game Full Throttle sequel was to be made...

posted by tredlow on - last edited - Viewed by 555 users

...would you be okay with it?

The question occurred to me when I recently found the trailer for the planned Full Throttle sequel. In my opinion, it looked really, really bad, but then it got me thinking about how the trailer suggested an action game rather than an adventure game. It also made me wonder what it'd look like if it were made in modern times, with today's graphic capabilities and video game audience.

Then I realized that if you described Full Throttle's premise today to a gamer with no knowledge of it, the adventure genre would not be the first thing that pops into that gamer's mind. This made me wonder what a Full Throttle action game would be like.

Anyway, I'm sure you all believe that it's wrong to make Full Throttle a non-adventure game. But when I think about it, the premise, setting, etc. really does fit the sandbox action-genre, and you can still tell a really great story using said genre.

I'm not saying it should be done. I'm saying that I wouldn't be too angered if, let's say, Double Fine decided to make the game.

How about you guys?

14 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • I don't like non-adventure game sequels to adventure games, period.
    Doesn't matter which games we're talking about.

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    Vainamoinen Moderator

    @Davies said: I think that Full Throttle is far more suited to an action based adaptation than most other adventure games (the original even had those fighting on your bike sequences). The preview of the cancelled sequel did look like a heap o' crap but that most mostly to do with the graphics and the actual gameplay mechanics being more than a little underwhelming. In the right hands, I think it could work.

    I agree. Full Throttle was a hybrid of gaming styles back then, it could lean in different directions today as well. The motorcycle element could be extended, maybe even with a bit of upgrading/roleplay elements. But I don't see how an entire game could work that way. We'd need characterisation and a stronger sense of place. So, action-adventure maybe. Still, if something like that would be announced, I'd be careful and wait for reviews...

  • @Vainamoinen said: But I don't see how an entire game could work that way. We'd need characterisation and a stronger sense of place.

    What do those things have to do with adventure games?

  • I would buy it... I would even probably like it... but I would still rather it be the same type of game that it was.

  • @JuntMonkey said: What do those things have to do with adventure games?

    I don't really understand this statement, but I think JuntMonkey meant that, these days, adventure games aren't the only genre that can provide characterization and a stronger sense of place, which I agree with. I mean, look at the Half-Life series; it's pure FPS with some physics puzzles, but it has great characterization and storytelling. Every character's personalities and the world the story takes place are established very well.

  • Half Life and adventures are two completely different things to me. I enjoy both but i'm looking for something different in an adventure than in a Half Life game.

    This reminds me of all the bad examples where people tried to mix a first person fps with rts.

  • @taumel said: Half Life and adventures are two completely different things to me. I enjoy both but i'm looking for something different in an adventure than in a Half Life game.

    This reminds me of all the bad examples where people tried to mix a first person fps with rts.

    Well, yeah. That's exactly what I was saying. A game can be completely non-adventure and still have great storytelling.

    Also, first person fps is redundant.

  • And i think lately we had too much tries at story telling and less focus on the other adventure aspects like groovy puzzles, inventory combinations and such things, i badly miss those classic ingredients.

    In Half Life i want to hit people with my crowbar in a active way, sorry but it's fun. In an adventure i somehow prefer obtaining/constructing one and finally using it on whatever i needed it for. That's more an intellectual thing, a certain level of abstraction isn't bad. I don't want these things mixed too much because generally you loose focus and as always when there are too many elements, it's harder to balance. Not saying that a, depending on the game, small Wack da Marsians, wouldn't be fun but i guess you get the idea. I guess part of the problem also is that our 3d interfaces still suck.

  • @taumel said: And i think lately we had too much tries at story telling and less focus on the other adventure aspects like groovy puzzles, inventory combinations and such things, i badly miss those classic ingredients.

    The real trick is actually combining story and gameplay. Storytelling shouldn't just be done in cutscenes.

  • It can also work out well if one part is strong enough, if both comes together even better but lacking in both disciplines isn't what puts adventures on the next level.

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