User Avatar Image

Legends, Myths, and Fairy Tales- what lore tickles your adventure bone?

posted by Sinaz20 on - last edited - Viewed by 1.4K users

Hi everyone. I just wanted to spark a new conversation as some of us swirl visions of Daventry in the backs of our minds (while working on current projects.)

I have been thinking a lot about the source inspiration for the King's Quest games. Roberta Williams developed a rich world of twisted fairytales, classical myth, and fantasy conventions. She pulled from so many sources that by the end of the series, it really felt like she was running out of material. She had begun to dip into more contemporary literature like Lewis Carroll.

I want to know what kind of material interests you. What stories, myth, legend, or fairytales do you feel got left behind or went unexamined?

I'm trying to compile a lot of research material to build a reference library for the eventual team.

I recently finished reading The Once and Future King followed up by Le Morte d'Arthur and have been feeling, "well, now, there's a King's quest!" This has actually spurred me on to more medievalist self-study, as I've begun to read some historical essays concerning the lives and cultures around European medieval cities and castles. I'm also revisiting some of my Norse mythology studies.

I'm going to be reading through the complete works of the Brothers Grimm to freshen up on my fairytales.

Obviously The Lord of the Rings is topical, so I'd like to hear some opinion about the themes and setting of Middle Earth. Appropriate? Relevant? No, no, stay away?

King's Quest has mostly been centered on European folklore, later reaching out to the Arabian Nights tales and nonsense (as in surreal) literature. Are there any other ethnic folklores/literature that I should consider? Would these other folklores feel off brand? I am partial to Chinese and Japanese legend, but that just seems totally out of left field for a King's Quest game. What do you think?

66 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • [quote]Because he's really, really famous, perhaps? :P

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Gaiman[/quote]

    Oh! He wrote Stardust! I haven't read the book, but the movie reminded me of King's Quest a lot!

  • @Sinaz20 said:
    King's Quest has mostly been centered on European folklore, later reaching out to the Arabian Nights tales and nonsense (as in surreal) literature. Are there any other ethnic folklores/literature that I should consider? Would these other folklores feel off brand? I am partial to Chinese and Japanese legend, but that just seems totally out of left field for a King's Quest game. What do you think?

    What about considering the norwegian fairy tales and folklore by Asbjørnsen and Moe. This may not be very familiar to people outside of Norway, but there is many elements in these storyes that would fit perfektly in a king's quest game.:)

  • Lambonius, may I ask, what the hell is that mosaic image supposed to be showing?

  • That's the Picard facepalm.

    The irony here is tangible.

  • Ahh I see it now (after shrinking the image down).

  • User Avatar Image
    harrisonpink Telltale Staff

    I've been reading a lot of Russian folklore recently myself. It's amazing how many stories revolve around "The dumbest of three kids was so dumb he didn't know anything but being happy all day, and he went on an adventure and was nice to a bunch of people who eventually helped him marry a princess".

    Well, maybe I'm over simplifying things there. The "helped him" part is usually where the fun stuff happens anyway :)

    It's amazing the common storytelling threads that tie together the Monomyth the world over! :)

  • @harrisonpink said: It's amazing the common storytelling threads that tie together the Monomyth the world over! :)

    That's why I find comparative mythology so fascinating and really enjoy a good mythological hodgepodge in the fantasy fiction I read/play/watch/experience.

  • @Bragol said: What about considering the norwegian fairy tales and folklore by Asbjørnsen and Moe. This may not be very familiar to people outside of Norway, but there is many elements in these storyes that would fit perfektly in a king's quest game.:)

    I think it's a great idea, and one could certainly pull more from Norse mythology as well (like the fantastic Valhall cartoons/movie with the artwork by Peter Madsen).

  • I definitely agree with harrisonpink. Have you seen Jim Henson's Storyteller? They use a lot of Russian folklore and they all seem like that.
    As to the mythology, I think that so much of the charm of the KQ games was the hidden (or not-so-hidden) references to folk-tale and mythology, but also to earlier games in the series and other Sierra games. I think it would be great to keep that going, possibly including references to other TellTale franchises.
    Don't forget North American folklore like Paul Bunyan, or the stories of Washington Irving. Or bigfoot. For those of us who remember the good ol' days of computer adventure gaming, how 'bout references to some classics, like Death on the Caribbean, The Great Underground Empire, Below the Root, or even Michael Crichton's Amazon.
    I guess I'm the only one who would think that including references to LOTR would be a good idea. These reimagined KQ games must appeal to OG fans of the series as well as new, younger gamers. Besides, these references don't even need to be part of the puzzles, just background.
    Regarding Asian folklore, I think this would be very appropriate to the series. I think KQ was always willing to explore myths that would be recognized by its audience, regardless of origin. I recall learning some Japanese folklore when I was very young, like Urashima Taro. And who among people my age doesn't remember Liang and the Magic Paint Brush from Reading Rainbow? Or Tiki Tiki Tembo? Or the *ahem* Five Chinese Brothers. I think there's definitely room to include true folklore or fairy tales from many other cultures. One of the funnest things about playing the original (especially 1-4) games, was going to the encyclopedia or library to look up the source stories or myths for inspiration to solve the puzzles. Living in such a small, small world as we do today, I think mixing the familiar with the exotic would keep that sense of excitement, as well as opening the franchise to more people.

    One last thing. I too, really loved the works of Lloyd Alexander. So I would definitely recommend reading the Mabinogion, (which, I believe is the greatest inspiration for the Prydain Chronicles).

  • Again I must insist, QUETZALCOATL!

Add Comment