User Avatar Image

KQ6: Overrated?

posted by Anakin Skywalker on - last edited - Viewed by 6.2K users

I know I'm committing blasphemy in the eyes of many KQ die hards by saying this, but am I alone in feeling that KQ6 is overrated? KQ6 kind of reminds me of TSL--It's a little too dark, it's dialogue is a little too formal and clinical (it's a bit too wordy and not to the point as the previous games), it strives--and goes overboard--in trying to get a mature, "epic" feel. It loses that fun, bright, mindless, lighthearted fairy tale feel which characterized the previous games, especially KQV (which is IMO the pinnacle of the series in many ways).

It's kind of like KQ meets GK (a series I've personally never cared for) in some ways with it's story of political intrigue, a dark murderous plot, and a secret society. It takes things into an adult sort of direction--As in, more catered to adults rather than the whole family as the previous games were.

That's not to say it doesn't have it's light moments--of course it does. But the lighthearted moments don't feel nearly as innocent or as natural as in KQV or KQVII--They feel almost kind of forced.

I actually find KQVII to be a better KQ sequel than VI. KQ7 to me is like Roberta meets Don Bluth--which IMO is a good mix.

I'll put it this way: KQVI opened the door to TSL. That makes it bad enough:p

268 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • If the choice is between having an at least reasonably well defined genre or watering the genre down so much that nearly everything will fit... then I'd say go with the former.
    Even though the latter would surely mean there would be a lot more 'adventure' games, what's the point if the games that make it up are different enough to have very little in common?

    Let's just call every game an adventure game and we'll never have to worry about adventure games dying ever again :p

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inca_(video_game)

    Inca, one of the strangest 'classic adventure games' of all time (1992). One of Sierra's best selling games even!

    The music alone was played on Radio Stations back then!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHRoygY6HTA

  • @BagginsKQ said: Nor is it a behind the shoulder camera. You aim it that way, but you can also aim to the front or the side of the character as well. If you aim it to the front, he walks towards the screen. If you aim it at the side he walks parallel to the screen. If you aim it behind, he walks away from the screen.

    Okay, if you want to play semantics, then I guess one would call it a character-oriented follow-shot camera view.

    Previous KQ games generally used a remote fixed-angle camera view.

    Either way you define it, it still changes an important aspect of the gameplay.

  • That's a difference between 2-d and 3-d... You really can't change the angle of view for a character in 2-d. In full exploratory 3-d you can.

    Your arguement is that Roberta should have stayed 2-d it seems. Roberta on the other hand wanted 3-d since she believed it would add more exploration than 2-d was capable of.

  • @Armakuni said: Maybe it would be a good idea to start using a seperate term for 'classic' adventure games, games such as the classic Sierra and Lucasfilm/Arts titles, and another one for just the generic pile of different games people like to classify as adventure games these days.

    Could help with some of the confusion... it could simply be called the 'classic adventure game genre' or something like that, as opposed to just the 'adventure genre'.

    @Armakuni said: Yes, bury the genre even more. Grab shovels, men, it looks like the adventure genre is on the rise again! We can't have that! We're purists, damn you, purists, and if it doesn't fit the style set in 1990, we want it killed dead!

    Actually, isn't the sub-genre already defined as "graphic adventure game" or "point-and-click adventure game"? Granted, the 'point-and-click' title is still confusingly inclusive of those with a parser and/or click-and-drag (thanks to TTG) as well.

  • @BagginsKQ said: Your arguement is that Roberta should have stayed 2-d it seems. Roberta on the other hand wanted 3-d since she believed it would add more exploration than 2-d was capable of.

    Are you saying that Roberta is the goddess of King's Quest and can do no wrong by it?

    To do so is like saying George Lucas can do no wrong by Star Wars, and that his intentions with the prequels were fully justified.


    Why would it require fully explorable environments anyway? I prefer TTG's Sam & Max series to MoE any day of the week. There's nothing wrong with TTG's camera angles.

  • @Chyron8472 said: Actually, isn't the sub-genre already defined as "graphic adventure game" or "point-and-click adventure game"? Granted, the 'point-and-click' title is still confusingly inclusive of those with a parser and/or click-and-drag (thanks to TTG) as well.

    Adventure ---> Graphic Adventure ---> Point and Click Graphic Adventure.
    That's how I'd categorize it, in terms of sub-genres.

    The way I'd categorize KQ's 1-4 would be:

    Adventure ---> Graphic Adventure ---> Parser Based Graphic Adventure

    5-6:

    Adventure ---> Graphic Adventure ---> Point and Click Adventure ---> Icon Based Point & Click Graphic Adventure

    7:

    Adventure ---> Graphic Adventure ---> Point and Click Adventure ---> Hot Spot based P&C Adventure

    8:

    Adventure ---> Graphic Adventure ---> 3D Point and Click Adventure ---> Hot Spot based Adventure + Action elements.

  • Are you saying that Roberta is the goddess of King's Quest and can do no wrong by it?

    To do so is like saying George Lucas can do no wrong by Star Wars, and that his intentions with the prequels were fully justified.


    I'm just saying you would never have been happy, since what you wanted, and what Roberta wanted were two very different things.

    You can read back in 1994, or so in Interaction. That Roberta had plans to make the next KQ 3D, and it wasn't going to be anything otherwise... Regardless of what fans may or may not wanted.

    Actually most people were intrigued back then, before she showed any screen shots. Many were still interested, even after she showed the first screen shots. It was very anticipated.

    Why you didn't bother to send letters in complaint back then, I have no idea! Because we knew it was going to happen for years!

    Why would it require fully explorable environments anyway? I prefer TTG's Sam & Max series to MoE any day of the week. There's nothing wrong with TTG's camera angles

    You may have missed this fact, but to fans of KQ, many believe exploration is an important aspect of KQ games. The latter games lost much of the exploration found in the earlier games. That was one aspect of the later games that was actually largely criticized by fans over the years.

    There is no exploration in Sam & Max... It's the same bloody town used over and over again... With one or two new rooms occasionally..

  • @BagginsKQ said: (Quoting an unreferenced source) "Examples of the (puzzle-adventure) genre include Schizm, Atlantis: The Lost Tales, Riddle of the Sphinx, Zack & Wiki: Quest for Barbaros' Treasure, and Myst, which pioneered this game style."

    Which of these games have you solving puzzles outside of the gameworld on screens designed to look like pieces of paper?

    Further response, also applicable to intervening posts concerning definition of adventure game:

    An adventure game has a player-character progressing through a gameworld, overcoming obstacles designed into the gameworld, primarily through puzzle-solving gameplay. This progress naturally entails the revealing of a story that, at minimum, gives meaning to the gameworld and the character's motivations, objectives and activities, etc. (as it does in related, gameworld-oriented genres). The "amount" of narrative, NPC interaction, dialog and other forms of exposition can and do vary widely within the genre (as they do in related, gameworld-oriented genres) -- and, really, vary along a spectrum, precluding the neat division of the genre into subgenres based on such things. (Although I could accept a subdivision based on puzzle type, but see my next thought.)

    I think it's important to remember that while games are divided into genres based on gameplay -- whether it's combat, platforming, puzzle-solving, role-playing -- most gameworld-oriented games are anywhere from slightly to hugely hybrid: shooters often have puzzles, adventures can have minigames, Sam and Max (the best ones!) have driving games, etc.

    My personal gaming preference is, the more hybrid the better. I guess that's why I welcomed the transition of KQ8 into a different genre of gameplay (as I did with Indy). I really think I see the game along the same lines on which Roberta designed it, but she doesn't seem to acknowledge that the adventure genre had already influenced, evolved, spun off into, and hybridized with related genres.

    At the same time, I'm sympathetic with folks who regarded KQ as an adventure game in a stricter sense (and they are entitled to so regard, for themselves, without giving a flying fuck what Roberta thought or said) and were disappointed when it changed. That has happened to me, too, under different circumstances, and it really sucks.

  • @Chyron8472 said: Are you saying that Roberta is the goddess of King's Quest and can do no wrong by it?

    To do so is like saying George Lucas can do no wrong by Star Wars, and that his intentions with the prequels were fully justified.


    Why would it require fully explorable environments anyway? I prefer TTG's Sam & Max series to MoE any day of the week. There's nothing wrong with TTG's camera angles.

    She did create the series. That's not some little fact. If not for Roberta, we wouldn't even be having any discussion of any King's Quest series.

Add Comment