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KQ7: Underrated?

posted by Anakin Skywalker on - last edited - Viewed by 683 users

Just as I feel KQ6 is overrated, I feel KQ7 is terribly underrated. In the other thread, I played Devil's Advocate when it was contrasted against KQ8, but KQ7 is truly a game I love. It's truly a modern fairy tale--something I think Roberta always wanted to create. I actually think KQ7 is the game she had wanted to create since the series began, as she'd always been influenced by Disney and fairy tales and the like, but never truly had the technology to create something Disney-like. KQ8 was a reaction to changing times and while she may have been proud of it--it was a reaction to the changing game climate.

But KQ7 is a very pure game; Roberta's influence on the game wasn't sullied by any suits or outside influences and the game to me is a masterpiece. It's truly like playing a Disney film, having a Disney game with you as the protagonist and it also manages to retain the KQ spirit. It's probably the most heart touching game in the series. If KQ4 is dark, eerie and urgent, KQ7 is light, beautiful and serene. It has some of the most beautiful artwork in the series--possibly the best and most wonderous game worlds besides KQ5.

It suffers from some of the same flaws KQ5 did--It was a transition game, a game which opened many doors, and as such, it was sort of a testing ground for new technology like KQ5 was. Later games like LSL 7 and SQ6 took the general idea that KQ7 had and improved on it, but even so, KQ7 stands as one of my favorite KQ games, and I wish we'd had another game or two in that Disney-esque style.

My top 5 KQ Games:
1) KQ5
2) KQ1SCI
3) KQ7
4) KQ4
5) KQ8

121 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Multiple modes of interaction -- a verb menu -- might not make any individual puzzle more difficult, but having those kinds of options adds to the overall complexity of a game. The more ways to interact you have, the less likely you are to stumble on solutions rather than arriving at them with forethought.

    Of course designers need to build puzzles that take advantage of less-than-obvious combinations of interactions and use them sparingly so they remain less-than-obvious, but I guess designers don't want to do that these days. Imagine Bernard walking into the surveillance room in the mansion, clicking on Edna and just pushing her, without giving the player an opportunity to talk to her first, and maybe not even trying to push her until they realized why they might have reason to.

    I've never thought of the verb menu or verb icons as "the interface". I think of them as my character's abilities, in the same way a shooter has combat capabilities or a character in a platformer has various ambulatory abilities. Designers of those kinds of games are constantly looking for ways to give players more options, but we adventure gamers are stuck with one click and watch the character do what needs to be done.

  • @thom-22 said: Multiple modes of interaction -- a verb menu -- might not make any individual puzzle more difficult, but having those kinds of options adds to the overall complexity of a game. The more ways to interact you have, the less likely you are to stumble on solutions rather than arriving at them with forethought.



    This. Plus, if the writing is good, there's a whole lot of interesting little game world tidbits that are really interesting to read/hear. Extremely witty and funny responses, in Space Quest's case.

  • What adventure game companies still use the verb menu?

  • But, at the same time, SQ6 didn't really need a narrator it is so detailed, but it kept one... I'm glad it did.

    There are tantalizing things to see in KQ7, that I would have liked to know even more about. Narrator often gave you backhistory, and details about a world's culture that the character wouldn't know.

    SQ6 does that, with its narrator!

    Freddy Pharkas did that, Gabriel Knight 1 did that! KQ6 did that...

  • @DAISHI said: What adventure game companies still use the verb menu?



    None to my knowledge. It's all left click = action and right click = examine. If that.

  • @DAISHI said: What adventure game companies still use the verb menu?



    The Next Big Thing has dual interaction modes implemented as cursor cycling. (I'm assuming you didn't literally mean a menu as it should have been clear I didn't.)

    What Makes You Tick: A Stitch in Time, an engaging indie adventure that recently picked up a publisher, has look/use/talk modes in a LucasArts-style verb-coin thing.

    Gemini Rue has a little popup box with hand/eye/mouth/foot (yes, four!) icons not unlike the Sierra set.

    I believe A Vampyre Story has multiple interaction modes, plus the flying thing. (Or am I confusing that with something else?)

    While not the traditional kinds of verbs/modes we're used to seeing, Machinarium -- what seems to me to be the most talked-about adventure game in non-adventure gaming communities in recent years (and it's still selling like hotcakes on the Mac App Store) -- has the functional equivalent in that the character can change size and extend limbs, innovative abilities that add complexity to interactions with the environment.

    That's just off the top of my head, mind you.

  • Oh wait, Hector has a couple extra icons/verb controls doesn't it?

  • Doh! I just played that two weeks ago and didn't think of it -- shows you how efficient the top of my head is. Yes, Hector, a Telltale-published game, has dual modes -- click and double-click, as befits its iOS origins.

  • @thom-22 said: Multiple modes of interaction -- a verb menu -- might not make any individual puzzle more difficult, but having those kinds of options adds to the overall complexity of a game. The more ways to interact you have, the less likely you are to stumble on solutions rather than arriving at them with forethought.

    Of course designers need to build puzzles that take advantage of less-than-obvious combinations of interactions and use them sparingly so they remain less-than-obvious, but I guess designers don't want to do that these days. Imagine Bernard walking into the surveillance room in the mansion, clicking on Edna and just pushing her, without giving the player an opportunity to talk to her first, and maybe not even trying to push her until they realized why they might have reason to.

    I've never thought of the verb menu or verb icons as "the interface". I think of them as my character's abilities, in the same way a shooter has combat capabilities or a character in a platformer has various ambulatory abilities. Designers of those kinds of games are constantly looking for ways to give players more options, but we adventure gamers are stuck with one click and watch the character do what needs to be done.



    Best post of the thread.

    This is EXACTLY what is wrong with Telltale's approach to adventure games.

    So yes, Cez, this absolutely is something that many dislike about all of Telltale's games. And something I utterly despise about KQ7 (though to be honest, the terrible interface is probably the LEAST offensive element of that awful turd of a game, in my opinion.) ;)

    The prospect of another KQ game that feels anything like KQ7 is the main thing that makes me throw up in the back of my mouth every time I think about Telltale working with the KQ license.

  • @Lambonius said: Best post of the thread.

    This is EXACTLY what is wrong with Telltale's approach to adventure games.

    So yes, Cez, this absolutely is something that many dislike about all of Telltale's games. And something I utterly despise about KQ7 (though to be honest, the terrible interface is probably the LEAST offensive element of that awful turd of a game, in my opinion.) ;)

    The prospect of another KQ game that feels anything like KQ7 is the main thing that makes me throw up in the back of my mouth every time I think about Telltale working with the KQ license.



    I never understand all the hate for KQ7...It's a beautiful game, beautiful worlds, a fun story with not too much depth, but which is well in keeping with the KQ storymold (save a world, help all the people in it, get help back, etc), it has Rosella (my second favorite KQ character next to Graham) starring in it again, it's light and not overly dark and Jane Jensen-ish like KQ6, it has great and wild and wacky characters, it was a pioneering sort of game in terms of technology like KQ5 was, I also much prefer the song in KQ7 to KQ6's Girl in the Tower.

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