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Can someone in California go to EA and slap them in the face for me?

posted by Zeek on - last edited - Viewed by 974 users

http://simsvip.com/?p=2937For those of you who do have Hidden Springs and have noticed a lack of animations and “glitters” from the Fountain of Youth (and spell book), need to know that there is an issue with Premium Content conflict.

We all know the Sims team will probably never fix this issue (what else is new) and more so because of their newest updated Simpoint/Digital Services Agreement you have to abide to.

[QUOTE]15. Disclaimer of Warranties. THE SIMS ONLINE SERVICES ARE PROVIDED ON AN “AS IS” BASIS. EA MAKES NO WARRANTIES WITH RESPECT TO THE SIMS ONLINE SERVICES, THE SIMS 3 CONTENT OR SIMPOINTS. TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, EA DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, TITLE AND NON INFRINGEMENT.EA DOES NOT WARRANT THAT THE FUNCTIONALITY OR OPERATION OF THE SIMS ONLINE SERVICES, EA ACCOUNTS OR SUPPORTING SYSTEMS AND WEBSITES (COLLECTIVELY, “EA SERVICES”) WILL BE UNINTERRUPTED OR FREE FROM ERROR, THAT ANY DEFECTS IN THE EA SERVICES WILL BE CORRECTED, OR THAT THE EA SERVICES OR THE SERVERS THAT MAKE THOSE EA SERVICES AVAILABLE ARE FREE OF VIRUSES OR OTHER HARMFUL CONDITIONS OR COMPONENTS.

EA is basically letting us know they never have to fix anything we purchase. Basically they can give you a flippin virus and it is not their problem.[/QUOTE]

...

Okay, WTF, EA? You just pretty much told your most profitable PC game you have under your ownership that you WON'T fix their DLC content if it conflicts with their existing game or even other DLC in your inventory. You've pretty much stated as well that your DLC may or may not be virus free.

Bottom line is that you're pretty much admitting to your Sims customers that you don't care about your product anymore. All you care about is their money.

I know this is a libabity clause designed to prevent the sue happy, but it's coming off as if you're saying that you don't care about your Sims 3 players as much as you care about their money.

And as someone who just got into The Sims franchise? That's off-putting enough to make me quit the franchise and not feel bad about it.

/rant

33 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • This is what I really don't understand.

    I mean, sure, I understand that EA wants to make money on their games, and I understand that selling the games yourself instead of through a service earns you more money. But why do such companies think their own service is what the consumer want? The consumer obviously doesn't want Origin, and it's a fact that Steam is just that popular as an online service. So why in heaven's name are game publishers so stubborn they need to create their own service? Do they really expect people to just buy these games through their own service?

    And yes, the answer is obviously "yes", because if they didn't think that they wouldn't have created the service. I'm already anticipating these smart-asses who think they're being smart.

    The point is, you solely go for your own distribution service, which is your own right, but don't expect all those people to flock to you to do their business. Yeah, I know that came out wrong.

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    Vainamoinen Moderator

    @der_ketzer said: Especially since there are only EA games, which I had no interest in for years now.

    Almost the same here - I focus on on only five or six games a year, which matches about the time I have to play games. But Mass Effect 3, which has Origin without a doubt, was next year's highlight, even so much that I would have considered Steam for a second (*shudder*). But I'm wiping this off my schedule now. There simply IS no Mass Effect 3. The series has ended with part 2, so nothing will come between FemShep and Liara. :D

    @der_ketzer said: The consumer obviously doesn't want Origin, and it's a fact that Steam is just that popular as an online service. So why in heaven's name are game publishers so stubborn they need to create their own service? Do they really expect people to just buy these games through their own service?

    Origin is hardly a "service". It's spyware that scans your entire computer for anything that EA might or might not like (while Steam reliably keeps its fingers in its own folders). Virus programs justly identify the software as malware.

    Unfortunately, retail editions have the same crap on them, and not only that, they still download a dozen GB from EA's servers for whatever reason. I do not see what makes these boxed editions "retail" now. It's some DVDs with nothing on them obviously.

    On Monday, after serious customer protest, EA Germany has meekly revised its EULA to "clarify" things; but the spyware remains completely unchanged. They claim that only file names are scanned, but they'd not look into the files themselves. In other words: Don't worry that EA fondles your genitals, they won't plug their fingers anywhere. :rolleyes:

  • @Vainamoinen said: Origin is hardly a "service". It's spyware that scans your entire computer for anything that EA might or might not like (while Steam reliably keeps its fingers in its own folders). Virus programs justly identify the software as malware.

    Okay then, perhaps it's more appropriate to say that it's like an STD-ridden prostitute who "services" your PC.

  • @Vainamoinen said: Now, my stance towards DRM is rather strict, as many of you know (as I'm not even using Steam), but even after its revision yesterday, EAs Origin-EULA must still be considered illegal/void under German law.

    I'm seeing this comment a lot on The Sims 3 Forums now, especially when it was discovered that UK consumers are getting Limited Edition DLC for buying the standard version from a store that charged them 7 pounds more than the retail price because of the Limited Edition label. Supposedly, the UK has very strict false advertising laws.

    My question: If these international laws are being broken, why haven't the international consumers sought out legal actions yet?

  • @Vainamoinen said: Almost the same here - I focus on on only five or six games a year, which matches about the time I have to play games. But Mass Effect 3, which has Origin without a doubt, was next year's highlight, even so much that I would have considered Steam for a second (*shudder*). But I'm wiping this off my schedule now. There simply IS no Mass Effect 3. The series has ended with part 2, so nothing will come between FemShep and Liara. :D

    Origin is hardly a "service". It's spyware that scans your entire computer for anything that EA might or might not like (while Steam reliably keeps its fingers in its own folders). Virus programs justly identify the software as malware.

    Unfortunately, retail editions have the same crap on them, and not only that, they still download a dozen GB from EA's servers for whatever reason. I do not see what makes these boxed editions "retail" now. It's some DVDs with nothing on them obviously.

    On Monday, after serious customer protest, EA Germany has meekly revised its EULA to "clarify" things; but the spyware remains completely unchanged. They claim that only file names are scanned, but they'd not look into the files themselves. In other words: Don't worry that EA fondles your genitals, they won't plug their fingers anywhere. :rolleyes:


    EA don't even see anything. The program sees it, sure. However nothing is sent to them.

    I actually went to the trouble of checking this out myself. Checking what it actually scans, and also what it sends from your computer.

    Conclusion? It's just a very poorly programmed piece of software. It grabs the BASIC information about files in your ProgramData folder meaning nothing is read inside, checking for any other EA games when Origin first loads up. Following that, it just accesses it's own files until you shut it down. The only stuff it sends is the usual stuff, your login information and the occasional heartbeat to check you're still online.

  • Is it wrong that this article made me smile like the Grinch at how damaging Origins has been to their German player base?

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    Vainamoinen Moderator

    @Rawr said: EA don't even see anything. The program sees it, sure. However nothing is sent to them.

    I actually went to the trouble of checking this out myself. Checking what it actually scans, and also what it sends from your computer.

    Conclusion? It's just a very poorly programmed piece of software. It grabs the BASIC information about files in your ProgramData folder meaning nothing is read inside, checking for any other EA games when Origin first loads up. Following that, it just accesses it's own files until you shut it down. The only stuff it sends is the usual stuff, your login information and the occasional heartbeat to check you're still online.

    Even in its revised form, the German EA EULA reserves the right to extensively check and send your system data (to look for piracy activities and the like). It has become clear that Origin already checks file names, but I trust you and others that at the time, it doesn't send that information anywhere. However, you don't just write that in your EULA without explicit intent to do this, if not today, then tomorrow. Origin is capable to do it, if not exactly in its present form, then undoubtedly after only a minor automatic update. The customer has already given permission for this, and it has become clear that it is the main reason for Origin to exist.

    Origin is certainly not a "copy protection mechanism", that much has become clear. The only other thing it can be is spyware. I actually don't smile at what happens in Germany right now. The protest is oh so necessary, but the damage to the PC as a gaming platform that Electronic Arts does right now is breathtaking. But the information EA wants to collect, and the uncontested control over their customers' hardware, that is something that will not only apply to PC gamers in the long run. The future generation of consoles will provide that technology as well, it is the only logical yet perverted step of the industry.

  • I suppose that's true. I think my biggest problem with this German movement is, you're only targeting EA. I'm all for privacy, but you need to target every company that does it, and EA's origin certainly isn't the only one.

    Even Steam has some very questionable parts to their ToS. I mean it said that they were allowed to share demographic/usage patterns/habit information with other parties. I don't really like the sound of that either. While EA said they'd gather the information, they said they wouldn't pass it onto third parties. Also more interestingly. Anything you say in any Steam related chat, be it a private friend chat in the program, or on their forum, Valve own it. Which effectively means they could snoop in on your chat and steal your idea for a game or something and you couldn't do anything about it(Not that they have the man power for that, but still!).

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    Vainamoinen Moderator

    Steam as a service is often attacked on Amazon.de, in those games that try to fake a retail release but still need a Steamworks account for activation. Unfortunately, those reviews get attacked by other Amazon customers very regularly, so they are often deleted also. Steam has a lot of acceptance in Germany, for better or worse.

    The early days of Ubisoft's game launcher, however, yielded some heated protest also. "Assassin's Creed 2" had an interesting 420 one-star reviews on Amazon.de. Try to find mine. :D

    It's nothing compared to the present turmoil, though. A lot of customers go a little overboard, confuse and exaggerate the facts. That of course gives EA the window to "clarify things", finding a confirmation for themselves that everything is OK and their customers are just stupid Germans who can't read normal EULA stuff.

    I'm not sure where we are when the dust settles. Could be anywhere.

  • Oh, look who got banned for "trolling" and posting an "Off-topic thread!" Me!

    :rolleyes:

    Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 1969 6:00 PM
    Subject: EA.com Terms of Service Violation


    Hello zeekslider,

    Your EA Account has been suspended due to a violation of our Terms of Service. This suspension not only restricts your access to TheSims3.com, but also limits your access to any other EA online property.

    The violation you are being suspended for can be found below:

    Any further violations can result in another suspension or even a permanent account ban.

    If you have any questions regarding this violation, we recommend you take a look at the EA Terms of Service by clicking on the link below:

    http://legal.ea.com/legal/legal.jsp?language=en

    If you have any general questions or concerns regarding this suspension, our support team is available to answer any questions you may have at the following address:

    http://support.ea.com.

    If you wish to appeal this suspension, take a look at the following article:

    http://support.ea.com/cgi-bin/ea.cfg/php/enduser/terminated_form.php

    Sincerely,

    Electronic Arts Customer Support.

    EA.com Customer Relations

    What this e-mail doesn't say is the context in which I posted the video.

    I was asking if some of those elements could be present in the Sims 3 Division of EA. It would explain the long list of existing bugs and the lack of timely and effective patches. Things related directly to The Sims 3 franchise itself.

    But the video was seen as trolling...

    And I've been suspended indefinitely. Guess the Sims 3 is going to have to go without one of their most dedicated community testers now.:rolleyes:

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