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The Original Ending to JP?

posted by Romeosierra616 on - last edited - Viewed by 526 users

Has anybody else wished that good 'ol Steven Spielberg had finished the original ending for Jurassic Park before going with the T-Rex rescue?

so at least we could have gotten a deleted scene or pictures at least?

I know it's kinda anti-climactic(not as depressing as the Novel ending though lol), but I would have loved to see it anyway :(

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  • @Shadowknight1 said: I mean, what's this original ending?

    Before they came up with the Raptor vs T-Rex scene they had a different ending planned. The raptors would be killed by getting crushed by the giant T-Rex fossile after it colapsed leaving one Raptor remaining which would be shot by John Hammond who would show up at the last second to save them with a shotgun. But Spielberg thought that the T-Rex was the real star of the movie and seeing how he was only seen twice so far he figured it would be best to have him show up one last time at the end. And so the final scene in the film was born.

    @Shadowknight1 said: the prey (grant, ellie, and the kids) may not have noticed him, but the predator who could potentially become the prey (the raptors) certainly would have. either way, to have the tremors in the scene, even if focus wasn't shifted to them, would have been good for the sake of consistency, even if they were softer and less frequent, like what one would imagine slowly, softly, sneakily stalking tyrannosaurus to sound like.

    Yeah, but then the scene would not have been as surprising. It was an edge of your seat type of thing. You know, "Oh no the raptors gona get em'! It's jumping at em' Holy SH!T T-Rex out of no where!!!"

  • Hmmmm...as awesome as the idea of Hammond with a shotgun is, I'm gonna have to side with Spielberg.

  • @waroftheworlds01 said: Johro, good point on that raptor cave. I was thinking the same thing when I read it again recently. It seemed like a very unnecessary risk taken for no other reason then to satisfy their own curiosity. I don't even think they brought weapons.

    I think that the reason they go after the raptor den is that they recognize the raptors as the most dangerous threat on the island (especially considering their migration), and in that den they may have survived to continue migration despite any aerial bombing of the island.

    I'm pretty sure that they took toxic grenades to kill the raptors, and they do end up destroying all of them that they can find before they get out.

    I think it's a great conclusion to the novel. This entire time they've been running and fighting to barely survive, but here and now they're going to risk everything to take responsibility for the mistake of creating the island's Frankenstein monster dinos (they're not strictly REAL dinos, if you remember the novel) and do their best to correct said mistake by confronting the most dangerous of said mistakes... those damned velociraptors.

    Also, I have to disagree on the dino hatchery scene: it was one of my favorite in the novel and I thought it was great stuff. The tiny raptor still makes me sad, though =(.

  • @hiplobonoxa said: it always bothered me that the tyrannosaurus, after attacking the explorers, was like a ninja. after putting so much emphasis on the impact tremors, he's able to sneak up on the gallimimus and then on the raptors without as much as a sound. it always struck me as mildly unbelievable.

    A good predator must be able to stalk and approach its prey without being detected, or it runs the risk of scaring its meal off. When the rex attacked the gallis and the raptors, it was in "hunter mode," stepping like a ninja. Earlier on the main road however, the rex didn't have to as careful ambushing a goat that its been conditioned to know isn't able to run off.
    Right after feeding, the rex no longer has a need to be so quiet, and stomping around and roaring in order to chase intruders (in this case, our human heroes) out of its territory may actually be part of its natural behavior. :cool:

  • @HooblaDGN said: I think that the reason they go after the raptor den is that they recognize the raptors as the most dangerous threat on the island (especially considering their migration), and in that den they may have survived to continue migration despite any aerial bombing of the island.

    I'm pretty sure that they took toxic grenades to kill the raptors, and they do end up destroying all of them that they can find before they get out.

    I think it's a great conclusion to the novel. This entire time they've been running and fighting to barely survive, but here and now they're going to risk everything to take responsibility for the mistake of creating the island's Frankenstein monster dinos (they're not strictly REAL dinos, if you remember the novel) and do their best to correct said mistake by confronting the most dangerous of said mistakes... those damned velociraptors.

    Also, I have to disagree on the dino hatchery scene: it was one of my favorite in the novel and I thought it was great stuff. The tiny raptor still makes me sad, though =(.

    Actually, I'm not entirely sure that they knew at the time that there was going to be a bombing, Either way, avoiding the possibility of raptors surviving in the underground nest was not the main concern.

    They knew how many raptors were bred originally, and they knew thanks to the counting system that the raptors were breeding and how many there were on the island at the time. They knew thanks to Tim (and Malcom's theory) that Raptors had gotten off of the island via the boat, but they didn't know how many. The only way to determine that was to count how many raptor eggs had hatched and subtract the number of wild-bred raptors were left on the island from that number.

    And I'm pretty sure they didn't kill any of the raptors themselves, the raptors were taken out when the island was bombed.

  • @ DeeRayl: you're right, they never use any of the "MORO-12" Nerve Gas Grenades that they take with them.



    I always assumed that the Raptors all swam out into the ocean when the big helicopter landed to get Grant, Ellie and Genarro, since the Novel states something like: Grant looks at the helicopter landing, and looks back to where the Raptors were on the beach a moment before, and they had all disappeared, "as if they were never there".

  • @DeeRayl said: Actually, I'm not entirely sure that they knew at the time that there was going to be a bombing, Either way, avoiding the possibility of raptors surviving in the underground nest was not the main concern.

    They knew how many raptors were bred originally, and they knew thanks to the counting system that the raptors were breeding and how many there were on the island at the time. They knew thanks to Tim (and Malcom's theory) that Raptors had gotten off of the island via the boat, but they didn't know how many. The only way to determine that was to count how many raptor eggs had hatched and subtract the number of wild-bred raptors were left on the island from that number.

    And I'm pretty sure they didn't kill any of the raptors themselves, the raptors were taken out when the island was bombed.

    Well damn, right you are. I do have to admit to skipping my annual reading of JP this year.

    Even with that in mind, I still think it's a great scene to end the story on. They HAVE been desperately trying to survive the entire book and now they have to take charge of their situation and deal with the ramifications of Hammond's monsters. And that realization that these things really ARE migrating.

  • I like the reminder of the novel's ideas about genetic engineering. In the films, InGen never admits to changing the genetic code of the animals with the exception of the extra bits they added in to complete the sequence and the faulty lysine production, but in the novels Wu (under Hammond's direction) went out of thier way to make dinosaur they thought people wanted to see as opposed to real animals.

  • It's a shame because if they had gone the novel's route that's how they could explain away raptors being the wrong sized and none feathered dinos

  • It could explain a lot of things. That's like the "A Wizard Did It" excuse of genetic engineering.

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