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Will Telltale's King's Quest be Based on the Novels?

posted by philthethrill on - last edited - Viewed by 714 users

I was just wondering if the King's Quest games from Telltale will be based on the King's Quest novels. IA's next King's Quest game will be based on the novel Kingdom of Sorrow. http://kingsquest.wikia.com/wiki/King%27s_Quest:_Kingdom_of_Sorrow

I was wondering if Telltale plans on doing the same thing with the other two novels, The Floating Castle http://kingsquest.wikia.com/wiki/King%27s_Quest:_The_Floating_Castle and See No Weevil http://kingsquest.wikia.com/wiki/King%27s_Quest:_See_No_Weevil.

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  • @Valiento said: Come to think of it, I understand there was a cell phone game starring Lovage but shared the Love for Sail title. It was an original story apparently. The strange thing was the reviews were fairly descent and some saying it got the feel of the old adventure games.

    It starred Laffer and was an actual adventure game. Ken Williams and Al Lowe appeared appeared as characters. You could tell the creators were fans of the original series.

  • @Valiento said: I'm not sure how he appears in the first Larry lovage game actually. I just know in the newest one he is pretty vile somewhat creepy old guy, owner of a porn studio. I haven't played the game just watched a few videos of it on YouTube.

    The newest game sorta re-imagines Lovage as well, makes him look like he's in his twenties. The art style is very differnment than the previous Larry games.

    The first Lovage game actually resembled the art style from previous games. Lovage practically looked like his uncle's twin. So I wouldn't be surprised if Laffer looked similar to his original appearance in that game. Only thing I've read about it is he is their mainly as a cameo, not much actual involvement.

    Come to think of it, I understand there was a cell phone game starring Lovage but shared the Love for Sail title. It was an original story apparently. The strange thing was the reviews were fairly descent and some saying it got the feel of the old adventure games.

    In MCL, the original larry appeared mych like how he had in LSL7 except he had grey hair on the side of his temples.

  • @doom saber said: In MCL, the original larry appeared mych like how he had in LSL7 except he had grey hair on the side of his temples.


    leisure-suit-larry-magna-cum-laude-2.jpg

  • Interesting... the UI bit in the bottom left corner looks like an evolution of the Sierra P/C interface.

  • I haven't read those novels, so I don't know if they are good or not. However I know that Sierra and Roberta had practically nothing to do with those books.

    I wish that TTG will develope original story (I trust to their writers based on my experience on their previous games) which happens after MoE rather than limit themselves by following novel's plot and trying to fit adventure between existing KQ games.

  • Roberta had little or nothing to do with the novels (other than read them, only considered them 'Ok, not great' ). Neither did Ken Williams. There is no evidence that the three authors involved the novels had any interaction with Roberta or any King's Quest staff.

    The novels themselves actually went through Sierra licensing to give permission to print them (published by arrangement with Sierra), and were advertised through Sierra's publishing department in InterAction magazine... That's about the limit of their connection to Sierra.

    Stark contrast to the The King's Quest Companion, where the author often worked directly with Roberta Williams, Ken Williams, Jane Jensen, Lorelei Shannon, and many others involved with both the King's Quest development, and Sierra upper echelons, as well as publishing. Jane Jensen even directly chose a professional non-sierra author ('eluki bes shahar') to write the KQ6 novel portion of the book. In contrast Roberta is said to love the books, and she became friends with Peter Spear.

    However Spear's books are written in a different genre ('non-fiction', although that is somewhat misleading, LOL), really, primarily intended to be direct walkthroughs and hintbooks for the games (the related authors just happened to write them in a 'novalized' style). As opposed to be intended to be published as a new 'fantasy' fiction novels (as the King' Quest novels were).

  • RE: Original topic:

    God, I hope not! The KQ novels suck balls. Only a group of real idiots would ever attempt to design a game around one of their corny plots.

  • @Lambonius said: RE: Original topic:

    God, I hope not! The KQ novels suck balls. Only a group of real idiots would ever attempt to design a game around one of their corny plots.

    Haven't read the novels but

    Maybe they like KQ, and wanted to make something good out of the books?

  • Haven't read the novels but

    Maybe they like KQ, and wanted to make something good out of the books?

    Lambonius is being satirical and sarcastic, he is joking, he is not being completely serious. He is involved with making a game based on one of the novels! So he is in fact poking fun at himself!

    Ya, the novels are actually better than "sucks balls", and Lambonius is not really a 'real idiot'!

    They are actually fairly entertaining... From a story stand point they are degrees better than the majority of the KQ games, as far as character development, and use of the English language... Perhaps this is actually a weakness (because one of the charms of KQ is its simplicity)

    But Shakespeare, Sir Thomas Malory, Milton, C.S. Lewis or Tolkien they are not!

    But ya, but neither are most (or all) of the King's Quest games themselves...

    Anyone who thinks King's Quest can compare to those and other literary classics are pretty much deluding themselves.

    But despite simplistic stories, what KQ has going for it was its sense of exploration, whimsy, and colorful characters. Of course, the 'interactivity'. Like I said KQ simplicity is one of its charms.

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