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The Silver Lining thread

posted by Mike Haley on - last edited - Viewed by 2.3K users

Nobody else has posted this, so...

It looks like The Silver Lining (formerly known as King's Quest IX: Every Cloak Has a Silver Lining) will finally be released in Summer 2009. That is, if Vivindi Games (now merged with Activision) doesn't sit on its royal ass during the approval process. Unfortunately, only the first two chapters of The Silver Lining will be released. The remaining chapters (3-9) will most likely never see the light of day. According to the team, it would take 10 or more years to complete them without proper funding, which even if they had, would put their fan license in jeopardy.

It would be interesting to see if they ultimately decide to release the remaining chapters one at a time over the next few years. I hear that episodic gaming is doing fairly well...

http://www.tsl-game.com/journal/special/

Now, I just wish that SQ7.org would receive permission from Vivindi Games to be completed.

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  • @Blackthorne519 said: I wasn't really trying to attack - I just felt sycophant was a more elaborate word than "yes man".

    I do think it's good advice, though - avoid the sycophants. When you surround yourself with people who have no backbone and laud your every movement, it dilutes the quality of your output. I enjoy working with people who, if they disagree, are able to tell me and communicate it clearly.


    Bt



    Blackthorne, thank you for clarifying. I agree with what you wrote here.

    I want to share a personal story concerning honesty and lack of pretence. It has nothing to do with King's Quest, though, so anyone not interested, please skip it...

    I grew up in a small, backwards Finnish town between 1978 and 1998. I had a happy childhood up until the 7th grade. By that point the virtues I mentioned above (honesty and lack of pretence) had become so important to me that I took an open stand in support of gay people, against the views of my homophobic classmates.

    I did this because I felt even then that it was important to stand up for truth and what you believe in, and I did it with the knowledge that it was social suicide in that time and place. Word got around and as a result of what I had said, I lived practically friendless between the ages of 12 and 18. I don't need to tell you they were long, lonely years. All I had done was make a stand for truth. It cost me plenty, but I'd do it again.

    The point is that honesty is one of the most important things to me in this life. I've made a commitment to it since I was old enough to consider the subject abstractly. If I tell you that I like or support something, I'm telling you the truth. I simply don't have the time or energy in this life to waste in saying things that are not true. No one needs to agree. I'm here not to convert, I'm here to share.

    A "yes-man" or "sycophant" is someone who lies hoping for personal gain. That's one of the worst, most deeply insulting things anyone could call me. If I was like that, I'd have taken the very easy (in the short run) way out back then by giving in to the prevailing gay-bashing attitudes.

    As far as I'm concerned, screw personal gain. I need to be able to look at myself in the mirror and know that I've been truthful. I'll be damned before compromising on this. Besides, lying always ends up biting you in the ass sooner or later, if by no other means, then psychologically - and if you think that would not be so bad, you have another think coming. So even for selfish people, it's simply a bad idea. Everyone will learn this either the easy or the hard way.

    So to reiterate, I admire a lot of what César and the rest of the TSL team have done. If anyone has a problem with that - me liking things - obviously that's not my problem. Another of my ideals dictates that I not always and routinely make everyone else suffer for it if I happen to dislike something I come across. I don't feel the need to bash everything just to prove how strong my views are or whatever. Anything I create myself will be imperfect. I know that. Why would I assume the same two points would not be true of everyone else?

    We are all learning. And we all need to give ourselves and each other the space to enjoy what we have for what it is. We only have a limited amount of time left. A lot of people here are in their twenties or thirties (I'm 33 myself) and have already used up a quarter or third or more of our expected lifespans. So let's make the time we have together worthwhile by appreciating the good things. By all means, share the bad as well - be honest - but do it gently, not in a way that just makes us all unhappy. That is not what we are here for.

    P.S. Thank you, Cez. You're right, it's their choice... It's just sad to think that even the most bitter "haters" (still can't think of a better word) out there were once wide-eyed children - bless them - captivated by the innocent magic of King's Quest, with their whole lives ahead of them, potentially full of wonder... only for it to come to this. I don't mean this as an insult, I feel genuinely sad for them. Something went wrong somewhere. :confused:

  • I was indeed captivated by the "innocent magic of King's Quest." I approached TSL with excitement and enthusiasm. Then that innocence and magic tried to throw herself off a balcony and shove ham-fisted Star Wars rip-offs down my throat.

  • But why do you keep doing this to yourself? You don't have to play and if you don't like what TSL does, the originals are still there. Like Raymond Chandler (I think it was) said when asked if he was troubled by what Hollywood had done to his books, he waved his hand at his bookshelf, with his books on it, and said that his books were fine, nothing had been done to them.

    I understand it can be upsetting to see something you grew up loving treated in a way that simply doesn't work for you. I had a similar (but milder) reaction to what happened to the Star Trek sequel series after Gene Roddenberry's death. At some point I realised I had to let go and stop watching because it was so disappointing to me. I took a long break, but have since resumed watching, now better able to appreciate them for what they are rather than what I tried to find in them back then.

    One thing that makes this an imperfect comparison is that I was reacting to official Star Trek, whereas TSL is not canon. I think it is not TSL that has harmed your perception of the magic of "your" King's Quest, but your own reactions and actions may have done that. But no permanent damage has been done in any case, I'm positive. I think that you may be seeing TSL as looming too large right now, but will come to see it in a more realistic perspective, as just one part among many in the KQ fandom.

    Sorry if any of this sounds harsh. And of course all this is just my opinion and I may be wrong. But I believe works of entertainment don't really have the power to make or break what we love, even if what we love is other, earlier works of entertainment. Trust me, the originals retain all their charm and are appreciated by many people, and many more will "rediscover the magic" when The Art of Sierra comes out.

    In any case, I wish you well. There are so many good things out there to enjoy and appreciate!

  • @Lambonius said: I was indeed captivated by the "innocent magic of King's Quest." I approached TSL with excitement and enthusiasm. Then that innocence and magic tried to throw herself off a balcony and shove ham-fisted Star Wars rip-offs down my throat.



    Amen. That's what people seem to forget, that many of the TSL "haters" started off as fans who were enthusiastic about a KQ sequel--even if it was a fan sequel. I can't speak for Lamb, but I know that I was a big time fan of TSL until the later trailers (nearing release) and first episode came out. I eagerly awaited it's release, and in the mean time, tried to promote the game to my friends and even family. I remember showing the trailer which came out during the 2005 Anniversary party to people I knew and being enthusiastic and excited.

    Spending 7 years waiting for a game (I came upon TSL in 2003, don't know about Lamb) and then having it basically be horrible and basically violate everything KQ was about, while claiming to uphold and even revive the spirit of the originals, was a big time disappointment, and was insulting actually. It's one thing if the team said, "This is gonna be real different", but they didn't. They went into this saying it was going to be a return to the old days, the pre-Mask era. That it was a return to normalcy, basically.

    Yeah, we always had a hint that it was going to be a bit more "mature"--But "more mature" in the context of KQ, at least to me, meant something like KQ6. That's not my favorite game in the series, but it's also not a horribly written teen fantasy story which rips off Star Wars and inserts tons of stuff which has nothing to do with, nor has any place in, King's Quest. Stuff that would have a much more fitting home in a Twilight or Kingdom Hearts sequel. And KQ6, while being more mature in many aspects, doesn't have a consistently melancholy, dark and soap opera-ish tone. And it's dialogue isn't nearly as bad, either.

    So instead of a "return to normalcy" or even a slighter more mature game ala KQ6, instead we got a game which has an overwrought, badly written plot, J-RPG inspired fight scenes, and backstories and character connections that are just totally pulled out of the air. Fan service abounds. Everyone seems to be connected to someone else in a very Star Wars-prequel-esque fashion. Valanice tries to commit suicide. It's not what you expect when you think of a "KQ" game.

    Yeah, sure, I'll have the original games. But fan project or not, they will feel pretty tarnished by what TSL presents. Given that Cesar will likely have some role or influence on TT's KQ, I doubt that TSL will ever fade into just being "one part among many" in the KQ fandom. The final episode won't be out until sometime next year, anyway, and in that time, it's going to be milked as much as they can milk it.

  • I think you're getting a touch paranoid there, man. I don't think Cesar will have any large impact on TT's KQ - if any at all.

    If you let TSL "tarnish" the original games in any way, you're giving power to TSL, and that's your own fault. The original games stand on their own. If needs be, just look at it how I look at - Graham ate a bad burrito after MoE, and had a bad nightmare. That nightmare was the Silver Lining. The next day, he woke up, and went about frolicking in the Daventry Countryside, picking carrots and tempting goats, as usual.

    All was well until that Goat decided to start talking, though....


    Bt

  • @Blackthorne519 said: I think you're getting a touch paranoid there, man. I don't think Cesar will have any large impact on TT's KQ - if any at all.

    If you let TSL "tarnish" the original games in any way, you're giving power to TSL, and that's your own fault. The original games stand on their own. If needs be, just look at it how I look at - Graham ate a bad burrito after MoE, and had a bad nightmare. That nightmare was the Silver Lining. The next day, he woke up, and went about frolicking in the Daventry Countryside, picking carrots and tempting goats, as usual.

    All was well until that Goat decided to start talking, though....


    Bt



    Just seems given his ego, his arrogance and his connection to TT (he's a former employee there who seems to still have many friends there), I can't see how his game wouldn't influence TT's even in some small way, given how over-exposed and over-promoted TSL has been. He wouldn't let TSL fade and be just another KQ fan game like that. That's not grandiose enough for him. Hell, this is a guy who wants to work on an SQ7 even though he likely knows the SQ fan base wouldn't want him anywhere near it--It's all for his own glory. Of all the fan games, TSL will probably be the first one looked at by TT as a sign of "what KQ fans want" in a KQ sequel, moreso than the other fan projects, because it's gotten much more attention over the years. And again, his tie with them is worrying.

    I suppose you could look at it that way, it's just given that as it stands it's the only 3D KQ game outside of Mask, and the fact that I spent seven years waiting for it, the memory of it is hard to just toss aside as being "Graham had some bad burritos from Taco Bell". I had very high hopes for TSL given how grandly it was promoted, and given the fact that in 2003, 2004, 2005, etc it seemed to be the only way we'd ever see an adventure game involving the Royal Family again. Those were some pretty exciting times--and I wasn't the only one who shared the awestruck enthusiasm over TSL. And those high hopes were burnt, badly. Perhaps I shouldn't have blindly supported them back when I did, but I was only 13.

    If they had told us the extent of just how much it was going to differ in spirit, tone and atmosphere from the originals, I probably wouldn't dislike it as much, because I would've known what to expect, and tempered my expectations as such. I don't dislike KQ8 as much because we were never told it was going to be the same; In fact, we were told explicitly to expect something very different from the very outset. When you go in to a game (or even a movie sequel or a book sequel, etc) with certain expectations, that expectation colors your perception upon playing it. With TSL, I expected, given what we were told, a game akin to KQ6--Slightly more mature, with a more sophisticated plot. Which is not what TSL is. It goes way beyond what KQ6 did.

    A good chunk of this disappointment is indeed my own fault. My own expectations were perhaps too high, but then, when you're promised some sort of epic, as a naive kid, can you expect anything less? I was a young kid who thought the idea of going back to the Green Isles would be amazing--like a return to an old, happy memory or a return to a bright beautiful place you once visited. I didn't understand the concepts of "fan service" or "cliches" at 13. I was just pumped up by blind nostalgia and by a sadness at the death of Sierra and here seemed to be the chance for that death to have not been in vain. I didn't understand the KQ series quite as well in 2003 as I do now. And given my understanding of what KQ is--and isn't--I can't support TSL.

  • @Anakin Skywalker said: Spending 7 years waiting for a game (I came upon TSL in 2003, don't know about Lamb) and then having it basically be horrible and basically violate everything KQ was about, while claiming to uphold and even revive the spirit of the originals, was a big time disappointment, and was insulting actually.



    Two questions:

    1. Is it really so hard to accept that "the spirit of King's Quest" and "everything King's Quest is about" might mean something different to the TSL team than it does to you or me?

    2. Is ANY piece of entertainment ever REALLY worth feeling insulted over?

  • Heh. Listen, I've been a King's Quest fan longer than you've been alive. The series will be just fine. Don't give yourself heartburn over all this.

    Bt

  • @doggans said: Two questions:

    1. Is it really so hard to accept that "the spirit of King's Quest" and "everything King's Quest is about" might mean something different to the TSL team than it does to you or me?

    2. Is ANY piece of entertainment ever REALLY worth feeling insulted over?



    1. It's just I don't see how someone could see TSL after playing KQ1-7/8. I don't think it was so much care for the "spirit of KQ" on their part as much as it was putting ideas that wouldn't otherwise get attention into a beloved series. Nothing to do with love or care for KQ.

    2. It's an insult in the context of being consistently lied to, being assured and made to expect one thing and getting something very different from what we were told to expect. Perhaps insult is the wrong word. Maybe incredibly disappointed.

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