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Telltale: What are you reasons behind graphical and game styles for the game?

posted by beavermatic on - last edited - Viewed by 448 users

Really love this game, and it plays perfectley on my machine... though I had some questions:

The game opts for more of the traditional Telltale games style visually... though its less cartoony, however more retains a more "action graphic novel" type of feel, which seems to be a different take on Jurassic Park's actual movie feel... intense realism. while some of the dinosaurs are amazingly detailed and modeled for realism, the surronding enviornment and character models on occasions seem more basic and simple. Was this to really put emphasis on the dinosaurs being the main attraction of the game? for performance and compatibility for a broader range of hardware? perhaps or just artistic decision? Why not opt for a Crysis-quality environment, FX for all animations and objects? Was the consideration to use a engine like idTech, Unreal or CryWare ever considered?

The gameplay style is heavily influenced by Heavy Rain as stated, but the game only relies on the quick-time "button mashing" aspects of heavy rain. Was there ever consideration to add 1st person / 3rd person control to the characters or vehicles? Was this to detract from spending too much time worrying about running around to focus more on a cinematic approach? Or for ease of access and playability from a larger rang of gamers to the series?

The storyline of the game is simply amazing... and the level of detail to continuity is flawless. How was it that it came to be? Was it influenced or overviewed by spielberg/crichton [before his death]/johnston? And had other storylines ever considered? Prequels or Sequels to the movies instead of a parallel alternate story to the first movie events as portrayed in the game?

The Sound FX and musical scores are top notch... blending seamlessly with the movies. I recall in previous games, even from Spielbergs own Dreamworks Interactive who produced Trespasser, the team had issues licensing music and jurassic park sound FX, and had to create their own from scratch. How did you overcome this hurdle? I also notice alot of the score and FX contained quite a bit of original content from the movies. Was the score based entirely from the official sountrack from the movie, or were new tunes created by the Telltale composers? As well as the dinosaur FX?

And finally, was anyone on the Telltale team part of previous Jurassic Park game projects out there? Operation Genesis, Trespasser, game mods, arcade games, consoles, etc...?

14 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @beavermatic said: 1) Why not opt for a Crysis-quality environment, FX for all animations and objects? Was the consideration to use a engine like idTech, Unreal or CryWare ever considered?

    2) I also notice alot of the score and FX contained quite a bit of original content from the movies. Was the score based entirely from the official sountrack from the movie, or were new tunes created by the Telltale composers?

    1) I seriously doubt third-party engines were considered when they have their own in-house engine.

    2) If I remember correctly, the original film music was licensed for use in the game (Though not for the standalone soundtrack), and TTG's usual composer, Jared Emerson-Johnson, mixed those with some original scores.

  • If you listen to the commentary tracks they say that they had a very limited polygon budget and an extremely limited animation budget.

  • I wasn't aware polygons cost money.

    Unless you mean budget as in restrictions like hardware or engine limitations

  • @beavermatic said: I wasn't aware polygons cost money.

    Unless you mean budget as in restrictions like hardware or engine limitations

    No artist charge to put the detail per polygon, the more polygons the more detail. More detail, more money...Which is why an Australian company is working on cloud point processing for graphics instead of polygons!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00gAbgBu8R4

  • Game Informer (only review online which is, in itself is bad news) said :

    On the other hand, Telltale’s cartoony, PS2-level graphics have trouble building the kind of immersion that enthralled audiences in 1993

    .

    The movie was a step forward in terms of immersion, thanks to its stunning FX and animatronics. The scenario was OK but quite poor compared to the novel. If you're going to make a solid JP game, you gotta use up-to-date technologies, not 10-year-old 3D models and effects.

  • @anthoto1 said: If you're going to make a solid JP game, you gotta use up-to-date technologies, not 10-year-old 3D models and effects.

    I certainly don't think the graphics are that dated, especially if compared to other adventure games. Clearly Jurassic Park is a niche title for a specific audience, and therefore has a limited budget. I think TellTale did a fantastic job with the engine and the graphics.

  • @xbskid said: 1) I seriously doubt third-party engines were considered when they have their own in-house engine.

    Exactly.

  • I've said this a few times on this forum - but here I go again.

    I think Universal wanted a company with a good track record to make games that were one or two steps above casual games. They're working under limited budgets, doing the best that they can, but sadly it's not as good as it could be. A Jurassic Park game under the guidance of a company with a larger budget and a better engine would have been AMAZING. I think Universal was looking to get a game out there to correspond with a few big Blu-ray releases, and wanted to do it cheaply.

    Not saying Telltale couldn't have made these games amazing given a much larger budget and time to develop a better looking engine, but that's not what Universal was looking for. Thats my 2-cents.

  • Why would Universal contract someone and half ass their budget? Thats just unfair to Telltale. Jurassic Park is a HUGE brand name? Certainly they could have risked a mainstream title budget and made a profit?

    I'm sure thats what happened... and either way, we still got a phenomenal game out of it, but you can tell corners had to be cut due to financing when it comes to engine technology.

  • @beavermatic said: Why would Universal contract someone and half ass their budget? Thats just unfair to Telltale. Jurassic Park is a HUGE brand name? Certainly they could have risked a mainstream title budget and made a profit?

    I'm sure thats what happened... and either way, we still got a phenomenal game out of it, but you can tell corners had to be cut due to financing when it comes to engine technology.

    Because Universal always half ass the budget, especially in this financial climate. They know telltale can work miracles out of an almost zero budget will staff that are willing to put the extra effort in for little to no money. They are also brilliant at telling well made stories (hence why this game is better than JP2 and 3 put together). They liked the pitch about a story based game rather than an action based game.

    So they squeezed telltale for all what they'are worth. Universal aren't the generous types unless say Spielberg was involved in the process, then they'd "magically" find the extra money for telltale to do whatever they wanted.

    I know because I've dealt with types like Universal. They try and screw anyone whenever they can, and squeeze a production team for everything they have without paying if they can help it.

    Hopefully some of the profit made will also go to telltale too so they can re-invest in the staff, talent and technology they currently have.

    On another note Crysis had a budget of $25, 000, 000 and Crysis 2 had an even larger budget. I very much doubt Universal gave telltale $25, 000, 000 to make a JP game. HOWEVER if the game sells a lot. telltale may be inclined to up the budget for Series 2.

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