User Avatar Image

The Great Sherlock Thread

posted by Ribs on - last edited - Viewed by 4.1K users

Oh, hello, I didn't see you there!

You either clicked on this thread for one of three reasons. You either;
A. Was curious about it's contents and had no interest in the topic.
B. Thought this thread was discussing the Ritchie films
or C. Wished to discuss the masterful BBC and PBS produced 'Sherlock' series, ran by Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat and starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman.

sherlockr.png

If you chose Option C, you are correct! That's right, the fantastic adventures of Sherlock and Dr. Watson shall continue starting New Years Day on BBC1 and each Sunday thereafter for a whopping three further weeks (insert 'Wow! Three Whole Weeks!'s)

If you've yet to experience the pure joy of the first series, it is available on Netflix streaming and on DVD (Amazon: US and UK).

Now then, let's get to the discussion, eh! Why not start with some thoughts on the first episode, Steven Moffat's "A Study in Pink"?

248 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • User Avatar Image
    Vainamoinen Moderator

    I own the blu rays and really wasn't disappointed by this series. The "Study in Pink" starts out strong, although a little predictable (40 minutes in, my friend already knew who the killer is). Holmes and Watson are brilliantly transferred into the 21st century. Holmes is a veritable sociopath and one sometimes wonders where this will eventually lead him. It's a rather different problem than in the books, where drugs came into play whenever the detective was bored. Here, Sherlock only uses nicotine patches when he needs to concentrate - that was never one of Holmes' problems in the book. ;)

    Martin Freeman makes a formidable Watson. Conan Doyle's Watson came fresh from Afghanistan - it's sad to see that his modern counterpart can come from the same country as a soldier. Watson, mostly the voice of reason in Doyle's work, starts out in almost the same role. However his crackpot potential becomes very aware in the first movie. He and Holmes form a dangerous couple in the BBC series.

    There was some discussion among my friends as to how Holmes' deductions play out. It's been quite some years since I read the books (I was the greatest fan when I was 15), but his conclusions based on almost nothing were always ludicrously far-fetched and the series continues that tradition very nicely.

    My point of critique was mainly with the last episode, "the Great Game". I'm not familiar with the bulk of Moffat's work, having only seen some key episodes of Doctor Who, but it seems to me that he sometimes loses his instinct when a story has enough pizzazz or what have you. This third TV movie was completely overdone, started out as a mildly enjoyable case stakkato and ended up as a bad spy movie parody which desperately tried to have the most interesting/eccentric bad guy in the history of moving pictures. Moffat kills his good basic idea and the entire narrative by piling up his finale moment into an insane heap of nonsense that would undoubtedly topple if it wasn't for those equally insane amounts of glue.

  • I was avoiding commenting on the Great Game until tomorrow, but I feel the need to point out that it was written by Mark Gatiss, co-creator and actor who plays Mycroft.

    And I think it's brilliant. One of the best episodes of television ever. How it all builds to that last scene is just amazing - and the cameo from Peter Davison didn't hurt.

  • I personally thought the third episode was superb; I wasn't entirely interested in the villain of the first, and while the middle story was interesting the writing was obviously weaker.

    I've never seen the DVD, though - still waiting for the price to drop to clearance! - but I gather it has the one-hour unaired pilot on it. What's that like/how does it compare to "A Study in Pink"?

  • @DAISHI said: Nobody should be named Benedict Cumberbatch.

    On the contrary, anyone who plays Sherlock Holmes should have a name like Benedict Cumberbatch. It's the best Sherlock actor name since Basil Rathbone. :p

    I do love the new series and I think they did a fantastic job bringing Holmes into the 21st century. I'm really not surprised that it worked so well. Holmes was always meant to be a modern man. Just because he was written in the late 19th century doesn't mean he can only exist there (in fact, many of the earlier Holmes films placed him in the modern era as well). I'm definitely looking forward to season 2, I've already got the blu-ray preordered from amazon UK.

    Also, the Guy Ritchie films are really not that bad. They get a lot more right than they get wrong, particularly in the first one. Jeremy Brett remains the definitive Holmes actor though.

  • @FitzoliverJ said: I've never seen the DVD, though - still waiting for the price to drop to clearance! - but I gather it has the one-hour unaired pilot on it. What's that like/how does it compare to "A Study in Pink"?

    It's mostly the same plot, just with tighter editing and less of the stylistic flourishes that they added to the series afterwards. There are a couple bits that I actually liked a little better in the original pilot. For example, I like that Holmes nips the whole gay theory in the bud by saying he's married to his work and finds romance to be a waste of time and brainpower. The setting of the final showdown is also a bit more interesting. But overall, the second version of the pilot is much more polished and much better.

  • @BlankCanvasDJ said: For example, I like that Holmes nips the whole gay theory in the bud by saying he's married to his work and finds romance to be a waste of time and brainpower.

    I just watched Pink yesterday, and that was most certainly there in the broadcast version.

  • @Ribs said: I just watched Pink yesterday, and that was most certainly there in the broadcast version.

    You're right, I'm sorry, I got my versions mixed up. He does go into a bit more of his philosophy on it and any other non-work-related activity ("The brain is what matters. Everything else is transport.")

    One thing I do remember that I liked better about the first version of the pilot, though, is that Holmes figured out the occupation of the killer fairly quickly. I liked that because, by the time they got to the restaurant scene, I had figured it out myself. It's not good to watch a Sherlock Holmes story and feel like you know something Holmes doesn't.

  • @BlankCanvasDJ said: You're right, I'm sorry, I got my versions mixed up. He does go into a bit more of his philosophy on it and any other non-work-related activity ("The brain is what matters. Everything else is transport.")

    One thing I do remember that I liked better about the first version of the pilot, though, is that Holmes figured out the occupation of the killer fairly quickly. I liked that because, by the time they got to the restaurant scene, I had figured it out myself. It's not good to watch a Sherlock Holmes story and feel like you know something Holmes doesn't.

    Yeah, upon rewatching it it's really rather obvious regarding the killer's ocupation from the first scene. Still very good television, though.

    My thoughts on the Blind Banker, though, are decidedly more negative. It just feels out of place; Steve Thompson seems to be an okay writer, but the story suffers for feeling insignificant, which would not be a problem if the series was produced in longer runs. Then again, the same problem occurred in Thompson's rather forgettable episode of Doctor Who this past season, which was much shorter and still struggled to hold viewer's attention. It's an okay story, but I feel it's lacking in mystery which is necessary in a Holmes story (thankfully, the next episode will more then make up for the lack of mystery in this one). 6/10

    I have faith in Thompson's episode this series, and find it odd that they've entrusted him with the proper adaptation of the Final Problem - a rather important story that could potentially greatly harm the series if adapted without proper skill.

  • @Ribs said: the same problem occurred in Thompson's rather forgettable episode of Doctor Who this past season, which was much shorter and still struggled to hold viewer's attention.



    In his defence, it was also badly edited, and probably badly directed as well.

  • And I thought the episode (of doctor who) was pretty awesome!
    But that's straying from the point: I wasn't a huge fan of "The blind Banker". It was definitely the weakest of the three episodes. Why, I don't really know, but it just seemed to be missing something. Maybe it was the setting I didn't like.

Add Comment