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When can we expect to see SOMETHING about Telltale's KQ?

posted by Blackthorne519 on - last edited - Viewed by 2.0K users

I wonder when we'll see or hear something substantial about Tell-Tale's King's Quest game.


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  • The magic battle was forgettable, imo. All you have to do is use common sense and if that doesn't work out for you then just save, pick one, restore, repeat. It's a no-brainer really so I just thought of it as an action sequence more than a puzzle. Similarly, I don't think of the sword fight at the end of KQ6 really as a puzzle either.

    I'm not saying those sequences are stupid. I'm saying I don't consider them as puzzles. ...more like interactive portions of the endgame cutscene.

  • While the bridle in KQ4 IS remarkably easy to miss and impossible to get back to, I wouldn't say it's the worst. That you have to GET a bridle, at least, is clear in the game--it is possible to use Cupid's arrow on the unicorn prior to getting eaten by the whale, so you can know you need something to ride the unicorn prior to ending up on the island.

    There should have been an easier clue to actually find the bridle, though, yes.

    The cheese, on the other hand--as pointed out, there is nothing pointing to it. If you missed it once, you're done (same as the bridle--Cassima only rescues you from the dungeon once, after all), you don't know you need it beforehand, and you get no clues at any point later that you do, either. At least the bridle makes sense and you know you need one.

    My vote for worst puzzle still goes to honey and emeralds, however.

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    exo

    These arguments between the cheese and the bridle make no sense.

    Yes, you knew you needed a bridle, but how does that help at all? Knowing you need a bridle does nothing to make it any more apparent that you need to search for it in such a specific place and in such a specific manner.

    If I can type "Look at ground" and that works in every other bloody screen in the game, then why would I continue typing this phrase in multiple places on the same screen expecting a different result?

    The thing that makes the bridle suck as a puzzle is not knowing you need it, or knowing when to use kit - it is finding it in the first place.... which shouldn't really be a puzzle to begin with.

    As lambonious pointed out, at least you could see the mouse hole. It isn't hidden behind something else with no clue it exists. If your going to complain about the mouse hole, you might as well complain about every pixel hunt puzzle that ever existed in an adventure game.

    Secondly - if I miss the cheese in the mouse hole, and I read the solution - I am going to blame myself for not being thorough enough. When I read that I had to be standing INSIDE a wrecked boat and type exactly what I had already tried.... well, I don't blame myself one bit for that. That is quite simply bad design.

    Typing look on ANY other screen details the entire surroundings, whether Rosella can see them for her point of view or not. This is the only example of the parser selectively deciding that it will not reveal information about an object because it doesn't believe you can see it unless your standing on top of it.

    Ultimately though, the bridle is ridiculously hard to find - but once you have it, you know what to do with it. The cheese has clues to find it, but once you have it you aren't clear on the point.... much like the damned yeti+ pie puzzle.

    And if anyone is going to criticize puzzles that don't make sense, then holy hell, how are they a fan of KQ in the first place? Yeti-pie face? jewels in honey to catch an elf (that only works in ONE specific spot)? Not only saying Rumplestiltskin backwards, but actually having to transcribe the alphabet in reverse? Having to save a rat from a cat, only getting one chance to do it, and specifically accomplishing this by throwing a shoe?

    Those are just a few of the strange ass requirements. There were quite a few other questionable "moon logic" puzzles as well.

    To put it quite plainly, it is sad when a nerdy 12 year old (myself) was able to beat leisure Suit Larry with no problems, but King's Quest sent me on several hunts for a hint. Scoring as a loser from the 70's should not come more naturally to a kid then solving riddles in a fairy tale =).

  • You know if the game had given the player the chance to find the bridle in the stable near Lolotte's castle, it would have made more logistical sense...

    is nothing pointing to it.

    Again, there is plenty of evidence to pointing to the cheese, once you get to the Dungeon... You are shown an animation of a rat/mouse going into a hole, even before the blue beast throws you into the room from his magic portal. You are given a minute or two look around the room, before Cassima shows up...

    Most people will have the sense to use the eye and hand on various points in the screen... Looking for stuff to pick up or look at... Looking at mouse hole, which people should have the sense of trying to look at, brings up a large close up of the mouse hole with a chunk of cheese in it... That's pretty blatant!

    The thing about rats in KQ6, they leave the screen, so there is no way to interact with them (other than look at them)! But in KQ5, the mouse disappears into a hole in the wall, that you can definitely look at.

    Cheese and 'mice/rats' have a sense of logic to them! Cheese is often associated with mouse/rat traps, and mice and rats are often shown nibbling cheese in cartoon pictures.

    Beyond that, the use of the cheese in the machine makes little sense...

    Having to save a rat from a cat, only getting one chance to do it, and specifically accomplishing this by throwing a shoe?


    You can throw a stick too (the stick or the shoe can be used against the dog as well, btw)... But there is some logic to this... In cartoons, whenever a cat or cats starts 'serenading' on the fence around someone's house, the first thing that the owner house does, is toss boots at the the cat!

    Also I can't see why people have such a problem realizing they need to save the rat... The whole purpose of most of the puzzles is to do good deeds... and there are several similar puzzles, saving the bees from the bear, saving the ants from the dog... The rat and the cat is an extension to the 'vermin' puzzle line...

    Plus to even activate the rat and the cat, you have to walk to a certain point in the screen at which point the game pauses, the narrator alerts you that a mangy cat is chasing a terrified rat (just before the rat and cat come onto the screen). At which point you are given the chance to save it.

    It's all rather obvious... Anyone who ignores it, just isn't thinking...

    Scoring as a loser from the 70's should not come more naturally to a kid then solving riddles in a fairy tale =)

    Keep in mind that some puzzles, people complain about in the series, are actually rooted in obscure fairy tales or mythology... Unless you know the mythology, those can be stumpers as well...

    LSL was more tied more into 'reality' and pop culture... So by nature its going to have less 'fantastical', more real-world logical puzzles.

    Yeti-pie face?

    Well, even it has a since of logic too it... Since 'pie to the face' is one of the oldest comedy tropes of the 20th century... considering at that point in the game you have no physical weapons (unless you count the tiny hammer), their isn't much you could actually try to use on the yeti...

    The only way you can possibly screw that up, is eat the pie... But their is enough in the game to warn you that's not the right decision... For example the fact you don't receive any points if you eat the pie... While eating the half a lamb leg gives you points.

  • @exo said: ...jewels in honey to catch an elf (that only works in ONE specific spot)?



    You can be standing anywhere in the scene and click the emeralds on either pair of eyes to trigger the puzzle, with Graham automatically walking over to where he needs to be.

  • @KatieHal said: That you have to GET a bridle, at least, is clear in the game [...] The cheese, on the other hand--as pointed out, there is nothing pointing to it. [...] you don't know you need it beforehand, and you get no clues at any point later that you do, either. At least the bridle makes sense and you know you need one.



    @KatieHal said: These arguments between the cheese and the bridle make no sense.

    Yes, you knew you needed a bridle, but how does that help at all? Knowing you need a bridle does nothing to make it any more apparent that you need to search for it in such a specific place and in such a specific manner.And how do you know in KQ1 that pushing on a rock from the wrong side will get you killed? Welcome to the world of the parser interface. There are various parser games where you get a different response for "look"ing around depending on where you are standing, not to mention various things the game won't let you look at because it says "you're not close enough." KQ4 is no different. If you don't like not being able to see a bridle while it's on the other side of a wooden barrier, then don't blame the game. Blame the nature of parser.



    @KatieHal said: Again, there is plenty of evidence to pointing to the cheese, once you get to the Dungeon... You are shown an animation of a rat/mouse going into a hole, even before the blue beast throws you into the room from his magic portal. You are given a minute or two look around the room, before Cassima shows up...Mice leave the screen in the catacombs in KQ6. Mice leave the screen in the dungeon in KQ5. Alexander can get caught, thrown in a dungeon cell and is rescued after a time in KQ6. Graham can get caught, thrown in a dungeon cell and is rescued after a time in KQ5. There is nothing of interest or value in Alexander's cell in KQ6.

    It is logical to see a correlation.

    If you reach the island, the only thing of value there (besides the means to leave, which you are able to do at any time) is the bridle, and the whale only starts appearing after Lollotte tells you to obtain the unicorn. Not before. It follows that you need to use the whale to get at what you're looking for if the whale never appeared before you were ever looking for it. The same goes for the ogre/ogress after she tells you to obtain the hen. There is no evidence at the associated puzzle or anywhere leading up to it pointing to the fact that you need cheese, and you get captured before you ever are given any hint that you need it. You might think the cheese's presence is obvious, but if it is missed there is nothing to suggest what it is that you needed. If you don't have the bridle, then you can make the unicorn like you but you can't ride on it, and you knew you were looking for the bridle when you get to where it is located; not so with the cheese.

    Further, getting out of the whale is a puzzle on its own, so you know that you're supposed to have reached that point. In KQ6 there is no need to ever be captured and thrown in the dungeon and to do so serves no purpose, so it follows that one might overlook it happening in KQ5.

  • Mice leave the screen in the catacombs in KQ6. Mice leave the screen in the dungeon in KQ5.



    Big difference, the rats leave the side of the screens, or into doors in KQ6. In KQ5 the mouse enters a hole.

    A astute and smart player would use the 'eye' and/or 'hand' on the the hole (and any other object on the screen). In KQ6 the average player would try looking at the 'passage ways' the rat went through. You are given several minutes to look around the screen for 2things to pick up... Anyone who has played a King's Quest game should know, always search high and low, inside, outside, underneath, behind...

    "When in doubt, or in trouble, pick up anything that is not nailed down, and if it is, look for loose nails or boards. Check carefully into, under, above, below, and behind things. Read everything; you might learn something...and always remember: nothing is as it appears."

    The big difference is in KQ5 (if you followed the major Adventure games mantra), you will be given a close up. "don't just assume' that because you got trapped in a seemingly useless room that there isn't something that you can't do to interact within it...

    As stated in the KQ5 manual, and is the standard rule in most adventure games, especially the early ones;

    1. "Look everywhere. Thouroughly explore your surroundings. Open doors and drawers. Look closely at objects you encounter or you may miss important clues.

    2. Explore each area of the game carefully, and draw a map as you progress through the game. Make a note of each area you visit, and include information about objects found there and dangerous areas nearby. If you miss an area, you may miss an important clue!

    3. Get objects you think will need...

    4. Use the items you have picked up to solve problems in the game. Different approaches to the puzzle may bring about a different outcome.

    5. Be careful, and remain alert at all times -- Disaster may strike in the most unlikely places!

    6. Save your game often, especially if you are about to try something new or potentially dangerous. This way, if the worst should happen, you won't have to start all over again from the beginning. Save games at different points, so you will be able to return to a desired point in the game. In effect, this will enable you to travel back through time and do things differently if you wish.

    7. Don't be discouraged. If you come to an obstacle that seems insurmountable, don't despair. Spend some time exploring in another area, and come back later. Every problem in the game has at least one solution, and some have more than one. Sometimes solving a problem one way will make it harder to solve the next, and sometimes it will make it easier. If you get stuck, you might try backtracking to an earlier point in the game, then choosing a different path...

    Anyone who missed the rather obvious 'mouse hole' clearly didn't follow the repeated rule to 'explore all surroundings', 'look at everything', or the 'pick up everything' not nailed down rules...

    Seriously a player that doesn't use the 'eye' and 'hand' icons, on everything in every screen, clearly doesn't know how to play a Sierra adventure game.

    Alexander can get caught, thrown in a dungeon cell and is rescued after a time in KQ6. Graham can get caught, thrown in a dungeon cell and is rescued after a time in KQ5. There is nothing of interest or value in Alexander's cell in KQ6.

    In KQ6 if you are captured in a cell, Jollo will rescue almost instantly (after the guards conversation). If you have the key, on the second lock in you can escape (after the guard's conversation). The third attempt will lead to automatic death scene, after the guards conversation.

    In all three instances the game pauses during the 'guards' conversation. In which you can't do anything but 'skip' the conversation by pushing any buttons.

    Also infact, there is something of value in the cells! The child ghost puzzle! You must give the hankerchief to the ghost, or the ghost will alert the guards to your presence! Woe betide you, if you never got the hankerchief from its mother.

  • @BagginsKQ said: Also infact, there is something of value in the cells! The child ghost puzzle!



    The child ghost is in a different cell than the one you are thrown into, and that cell is never locked. You don't need to be captured to enter it.

  • The cell you thrown into in KQ6, is random actually. I've tested this many times.

    The cell you end up will always be locked, by the guards...

    However, if you don't help the ghost, it will alert the guards.

    Edit: Also tested, and the ghost can randomly appear in all three cells! Or at least seems to primarily choose to haunt the north and middle cells the most.

    In anycase, you don't just assume a place is 'useless' or 'has nothing'. The rules in these games, was to check everything you could, explore everything, try to pick up everything. The developers intended players to be thourough. Once a player had finished investigation that was the point they could decide if they had been found everything or not.

  • The boy ghost to me is a bit of Fridge Horror. It implies that Caliphim (or possibly one of his ancestors) locked a little boy in a dungeon, possibly along with his mother, to die. I don't think Alhazred did it, although I suppose it is possible.

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