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Does this game suck?

posted by supmandude85 on - last edited - Viewed by 831 users

I'm thinking of buying it, but is the game play as bad as Back to the Future or Jurassic Park?

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  • @coolsome said: So unless its puzzles there's no thought? I haven't played L&O but detective games should play where you interview ppl find evidence guess who's lying that sort of thing. Maybe chase criminals and look for evidence. And the Law part where you say the right things and back it up like on the TV. It doesn't need puzzles cos its not an adventure game but that don't mean it has to be brainless and easy.

    I'm not saying it needs puzzles to have thought, but with something like L.A. Noire there are more actions to get you invested in solving the case. Like doubting and saying they're lying. It's not just click a topic and hope you win by the luck of the draw. Now I still haven't played it, but this is what I'm assuming it's like based on what others have said and my lack of faith in Telltale as of late.

    @coolsome said: Hey! The Blue's Clues point-and-click adventure was a classic.

    I actually played that when I was a kid. From what I remember it was harder than Back to the Future and I have no doubt it was harder than Jurassic Park.

  • If you're viewing it as an adventure game, it's bound to disappoint. That's not the point of the game . . . it's not an adventure game.

    Yes, Telltale has made a name for themselves on adventure games, but that's not what this is. It's like being a fan of Dungeons & Dragons and being disappointed with Magic the Gathering because it's a lousy roleplaying game (since they're made by the same company, it must play the same, right?).

    IMO, the correct way to view this game is one of two ways:

    [LIST=1]
    [*]A really good version of EA's story games (Surviving High School and Cause of Death).
    [*]A hybrid of hidden-object-style gameplay and interactive storytelling.
    [*]An interactive graphic novel/story.
    [/LIST]

    The latter is particularly noteworthy. A new issue of (say) Batman will cost you $2.99 via Comixology. You'll read through it in 20 minutes (if that), and forget about it. Each episode of this game is $2.99 on the iPad, it comes with a full-voice cast, animation, etc. (which you wouldn't get with a novel/comic). Its interactivity ensures you're able to play it for at least an hour. It tells an interesting story, and if you like the Law & Order universe, it fits well with that mindset. (If you view it from the mindset of hidden-object-game pricing -- which tend to range from $2.99 to $9.99 apiece -- it also compares favorably.)

    For the curious, I offer some more thoughts on Telltale's blog.

  • @supmandude85 said: I'm not saying it needs puzzles to have thought, but with something like L.A. Noire there are more actions to get you invested in solving the case. Like doubting and saying they're lying. It's not just click a topic and hope you win by the luck of the draw. Now I still haven't played it, but this is what I'm assuming it's like based on what others have said and my lack of faith in Telltale as of late.

    If it is like what you think then Il agree but the trailer said it isnt luck based and you have to back up what you say with evidence.

  • @Vainamoinen said: Okay, any post beginning with "I haven't played it myself, but..." is obviously not a good read. Sorry.

    You're making premature judgments! How do you know it's not good if you haven't read it?

  • @waitingforgo said: If you're viewing it as an adventure game, it's bound to disappoint. That's not the point of the game . . . it's not an adventure game.

    Yes, Telltale has made a name for themselves on adventure games, but that's not what this is. It's like being a fan of Dungeons & Dragons and being disappointed with Magic the Gathering because it's a lousy roleplaying game (since they're made by the same company, it must play the same, right?).

    I see where you're coming from with that, but Magic the Gathering didn't market itself as a roleplaying game. Law and Order, Back to the Future, and Jurassic Park all have been marketed as adventure games. All Telltale is doing is alienating their old fans with their new "games." Plus, Telltale's basically stopped making adventure games altogether which is the something people complain about Lucasarts doing. The only difference is Telltale is now making them in name only. If they wanna make movies, they can make movies, but I wish they'd label them as that. It just pisses me off, because I used to love Telltale, but they stopped wanting to make games and moved on to these movies that you watch and occasionally press a button.

    @waitingforgo said: If it is like what you think then Il agree but the trailer said it isnt luck based and you have to back up what you say with evidence.

    I don't know, but I'm not going to be the guinea pig with this.

  • @supmandude85 said: I see where you're coming from with that, but Magic the Gathering didn't market itself as a roleplaying game. Law and Order, Back to the Future, and Jurassic Park all have been marketed as adventure games. All Telltale is doing is alienating their old fans with their new "games." Plus, Telltale's basically stopped making adventure games altogether which is the something people complain about Lucasarts doing. The only difference is Telltale is now making them in name only. If they wanna make movies, they can make movies, but I wish they'd label them as that. It just pisses me off, because I used to love Telltale, but they stopped wanting to make games and moved on to these movies that you watch and occasionally press a button.

    I've got to agree here. I wouldn't mind Telltale's more recent stuff half as much if they'd just be honest about what they are. I remember a while ago Dan Connors suggested a classification system for their games.

    "Adventure" (Sam and Max, ToMI, Strong Bad, Wallace and Gromit...)
    "Easy Adventure" (Back to the Future)
    "Interactive Movie" (Jurassic Park, Law and Order)

    If each game was given a classification like that and have it made clear on their Telltale Store/Steam page, that'd be a huge help. At least then someone knows what they're getting into.

  • I can see that.

    I admit I'm coming at it from a POV that's fairly . . . permissive? I like most forms of interactive storytelling, from full-scale adventure games to CYOA games to Fighting Fantasy-style paragraph RPGs to full-scale RPGs. So whenever Telltale releases something that's a bit different from the norm, my brain goes, "Huh, that's different. Is it still a fun interactive story?" If so, I'm good!

    However, if I didn't actually care for stories as much as the adventure-game gameplay, I could definitely see how their recent offerings might be disappointing (although hopefully they're coming out ahead by getting folks who aren't die-hard adventure gamers).

    And, for the record, I find most adventure-game tropes to be dreadfully unfun. (I agree 100% with the assessments from the Old Man Murray article, which centers around the quest for a fake mustache in a Gabriel Knight' game.) I enjoy playing the first Hector game in spite of the dumber puzzle bits, not because of them.

  • I'll give you that. I love the adventure games of old to death, but the insane leaps of logic some puzzles required could be annoying.

    Still, adventure games don't have to be like that. Telltale's older stuff was challenging while still having solutions that the player would be able to deduce. (The closest they've done to a true bullshit puzzle is the snail gong in Episode 202 of Sam and Max, and even then there's information that hints at the solution beforehand.)

  • For the longest time they made games based on the CSI: Vegas license, and I always used to bash how bad the characters looked and various other shortcomings the games suffered from...

    Then another developer got their hands the CSI: NY license and totally failed on a cosmic horror level that I cannot even begin to describe here.

    Now, I am thankful for telltales additions to the franchise, and I have since stopped complaining about their graphics because (at least until last years JP release) they still know how to make a fun game to play.

    Although objectively, I still think they should just stop doing games using human characters based on real actors and licenses... Bottom line, it can't be done with the short production schedules that telltale works on or with their existing technology... I wish they would just give up on it, or seriously overhaul their engine cause they have been using the same one since 2005 (where it was already several years behind industry standards) and it is beginning to show its age even more than the source engine

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    @RAnthonyMahan said: You're making premature judgments! How do you know it's not good if you haven't read it?

    I did read it! ;)

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