User Avatar Image

Best and Worst KQ game?

posted by Anakin Skywalker on - last edited - Viewed by 2.3K users

Which are the best and worst KQ games, and why?

173 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • I've always wanted to play one of the Sierra games in a somewhat misguided attempt to prove that not everyone in the Xbox generation is an idiot, plus I've always enjoyed adventures games as far back as I remember probably starting when I got some of the HE adventures games when I was like a toddler.

  • HE adventures?

    BTW, you can play the first of the AGI official games on Sarien.net, semi-officially (the unofficial stuff, is the 'multiplayer' stuff). They got a license from Activision to upload the first of each series. Though technically Activison doesn't own the rights to Gold Rush! (that belongs to the Software Farm, original designers own the rights) or Black Cauldron (that belongs to Disney), or the Leisure Suit Larry games.

    http://www.sarien.net/

    So ya, technically Sarien.net may be pirating California: Gold Rush! and Black Cauldron (as Activision doesn't hold the rights to those games)... They no longer have the Larry games, as Activision doesn't hold the rights to that game.

    http://www.softwarefarm.com/gr_collector.htm

    You can get the original games (all eight) at GoG.com or Steam (the first seven).

    Keep in mind, GOG lacks the remake of KQ1, and Steam lacks the original of KQ1. The intent of the GOG collections was to highlight the developmental history of the games from the original KQ1 to the last (KQ8).

    Another problem with the Steam release is that KQ7 version included in it, isn't compatible with 64-bit windows.

  • If you don't have any prior experience with a text parser, then I would recommend starting with the AGDI remakes of KQ1 and KQ2. Even if it initially seems that this is not your kind of game, stick it out with the first one because the second is an absolutely awesome Sierra-style gaming experience. Understand going in that you're not getting story canon (you can get that later if desired) but KQ games do not require any deep understanding of canon as you move from one to the next.

    @BagginsKQ said: HE adventures?

    Humongous Entertainment?

  • the second is an absolutely awesome Sierra-style gaming experience. Understand going in that you're not getting story canon (you can get that later if desired) but KQ games do not require any deep understanding of canon as you move from one to the next.

    I really don't recommend jumping into KQ2:Romancing the Stones from AGDI, without having played the rest of the series first (canon series first in order)... There are many references that require knowledge of later games in the series including KQ3, KQ6, and KQ8. There are even a few nods to KQ4, and KQ7 as well. Maybe even KQ5.

    The AGDI remakes of KQ2 and KQ3 are designed in such a way, that to best enjoy them, you would have to know everything about the official series first.

    King's Quest 3 from Infamous Adventures fewer direct references to any other games in the series directly (other than some KQ5/KQ6 easter eggs/nods). So there is less worry, that you'll miss the references from some of the 'easter eggs', or be 'spoiled' by foreknowledge of future events in the series...

    I'd think of it much as how its always best to read books series in 'publishing' order, as opposed to 'chronological', as often there are nods to things that are best understood if you have read the first published book first.

    For example, in some ways Narnia flows better if you read them in the order they were written. As that is how the references build upon each other. Although in hindsight, C.S. Lewis preferred reading them in 'chronological' order.

    With Tolkien's works, its better to read them in published order, of Hobbit, Lord of the Rings, the Silmarillion, Unfinished Tales, HoME (slightly more optional, and not all of it is relevent to Middle Earth history) and then Children of Hurin (though this can be read in place of the same chapter in Silmarillion for the extended tale). Then it is to try to read them in a linear chronological fashion. As Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales contain 'spoilers' for earlier books in the series.

  • The references themselves aren't required to enjoy the game, though.

  • But some of them can make things a little more confusing, without knowledge of later games, or spoil events in later games.

  • @BagginsKQ said: I really don't recommend jumping into KQ2:Romancing the Stones from AGDI, without having played the rest of the series first (canon series first in order)... There are many references that require knowledge of later games in the series including KQ3, KQ6, and KQ8. There are even a few nods to KQ4, and KQ7 as well. Maybe even KQ5.

    The AGDI remakes of KQ2 and KQ3 are designed in such a way, that to best enjoy them, you would have to know everything about the official series first.

    Well, I do recommend them and I disagree with that last statement. :D

    Sorry, Baggins, but the details of canon are never going to be as important to me as they are to you. That's simply not what the games meant to me. (The wholesale changes in story-telling style and tone in a certain other fan-made non-remake game is a different matter, about which I agree with you completely.)

    I think it's far more important to prevent the possibility that a new player gets turned off to KQ/Sierra by the text parser, dead ends, and the older style of graphics than it is to make sure that they start with canon.

  • It seems were are discussing two very different things...
    The wholesale changes in story-telling style and tone in a certain other fan-made non-remake game is a different matter, about which I agree with you completely.)

    Personally, I'd say the tone of the KQ2 fan remake, and KQ3 Redux remake are different than the tone of the original games they were designed after... Darker in tone in some ways, more 'moody and angst'...

    The 'good vampire' plotline leans to far on modern holywood vampire (more Twilight than Dracula), instead of the traditional vampire myth... The idea of a young innocent girl being turned into an undead vampire (with very little direct impact on the story ethically) instead of given that choice goes against style Roberta Williams (more black and white sense of morality) was known for, except for you look at Phantasmagoria... In some ways its more Gabriel night/Jane Jensen than Roberta's King's Quest (point of note even Roberta admitted that KQ6 was not in her style, and more influenced by Jane Jensen).

    This quest seems to have a darker, more ominous tone than the other King’s Quests; it is also more wordy. Is there a reason?

    I was thinking that same thing the other day, but I don’t believe we made it intentionally ominous. It just turned out that way.

    The reason it’s more wordy is that I didn’t write the text. This is the first time I have had a collaborator. Jane Jensen wrote all the script, and we worked on the story line and character together. We spent a month working together before Ken and I left on a two-month vacation to France.

    Jane has a different style than I do, and maybe she is more text oriented. Even her design documents were four times as thick as mine usually are - her fingers just fly on a word processor.

    Roberta also tended to lean on christian myth & black and white moral choices, so her priests were good, and vampires were evil... Samhain was a god of death (a conservative christian myth/propaganda from 1700s about Pagans and Druids that Wiccans actually find as prejudiced towards their beliefs...)...

    Both AGDI and TSL rely too much on the concepts of Black Cloak Society, and there involvement witih 'everything' that has happened during the series... There manipulations are forced into being the motive behind nearly every other game in the series past and future (this is one of the reasons I recommend playing the original series in order first to be able catch these references, and not be spoiled)...

    Graham is ancestor/reincarnation of an ancient super race in TSL (Leo the Noble) and he's the ancestor of ancient super race in AGDI (Leginimor and Granthithor)...

    The Father is ancient, and the leading member of a super race from Daventry's ancient past... Shadrack is ancient, and the leading member of a super race from Daventry's past... Both are destined to battle with Graham in the present...

    In both stories the Black Cloaks and royal family are destined to fight each other over millennia, until a prophecy is fulfilled...

    In both games, the villains are concerned with obtaining ancient treasures to regain their ultimate and dark powers (Pandora's Box and The Item)....

    I always find there is a certain level of fanboyism that people seem to overlook the similiarties between both stories, and play favorites to which ever series they are fans with (there are TSL fanboys that think that game is better, and there are AGDI fanboys that think that game is better, although they share many of the same concepts)...

    Personally I don't find both stories all that original (and are representive of much that is fan fiction (mary/gary stus and all))...

    Personally I'm looking forward to MusicallyInspired's KQ2 remake, as I think he's going to get it right... Not resort to any fan fiction cliches...

  • @BagginsKQ said: Personally, I'd say the tone of the KQ2 fan remake, and KQ3 Redux remake are different than the tone of the original games they were designed after... Darker in tone in some ways, more 'moody and angst'...

    The overall tone of AGDI's remakes doesn't seem remarkably different from the originals, or moody or angsty, to me. The Father stuff was enjoyable as a transient departure from canon, but pretty much went in one ear and out the other; I never felt like I was being hammered over the head with it. I was immersed in the beautiful gameworld and the general idea of the quest, not the details or comparative analysis with other kinds of fiction.

Add Comment