User Avatar Image

When can we expect to see SOMETHING about Telltale's KQ?

posted by Blackthorne519 on - last edited - Viewed by 3K users

I wonder when we'll see or hear something substantial about Tell-Tale's King's Quest game.


Bt

480 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Made a few more edits, and observations, and comparisons between the game and novelized versions of the green isles conspiracy.

    Primarily the differences in who is involved.

    The game making it primarily Alhazred's plan. It is "My" (from Alhazred's prespective); "My long preparations", "my power and my crown" (from Alhazred's) and "yours" (from Shadrack's POV); "your way", "your crown", "kingdom of yours"). Whereas the companion makes it both of their plans, "Our plans", though Shadrack acknowledges that Alhazred is doing most of the work!

    I think one thing to take note, in the game, that Shadrack seems to acknowledge Mordack of being at least an equal to him, if not more (all though not so much in chess), as he calls him the 'great Mordack'.

    From the Companion perspective he seems to treat Alhazred as a lesser to him. Noting that while he does compliment Alhazred a bit, at the same time he ribs him a bit by pointing out Alhazred's success at causing the islands to turn on each other, and eliminating the parents is a 'strategem worthy of even himself'.

    I'm still not sure how much Mordack was involved in the plans... Was he fully in on it? Or did Alhazred (and/or Shadrack) just take advantage of Alhazred's friendship/insubordination to Mordack, in an attempt to get rid of a loose end. We know in both versions of the letter, the idea was at least Shadrack's idea to get rid of Cassima (...i.e. "recommended/advised").

    Also Shadrack seems to see cassima as actively 'meddling' into his own plans in the Companion (whereas in the game, he seems to just warn that she could pose a threat to Alhazred if not dealt with).

    The end twist could be that the main protagonist is really a long lost member of the Royal family. Haha


    Cousin (or evil Uncle) Ralphy, everyone calls him Bob... He could be Graham's long lost brother?

  • @BagginsKQ said: Made a few more edits, and observations, and comparisons between the game and novelized versions of the green isles conspiracy.

    Primarily the differences in who is involved.

    The game making it primarily Alhazred's plan. It is "My" (from Alhazred's prespective); "My long preparations", "my power and my crown" (from Alhazred's) and "yours" (from Shadrack's POV); "your way", "your crown", "kingdom of yours"). Whereas the companion makes it both of their plans, "Our plans", though Shadrack acknowledges that Alhazred is doing most of the work!

    I think one thing to take note, in the game, that Shadrack seems to acknowledge Mordack of being at least an equal to him, if not more (all though not so much in chess), as he calls him the 'great Mordack'.

    From the Companion perspective he seems to treat Alhazred as a lesser to him. Noting that while he does compliment Alhazred a bit, at the same time he ribs him a bit by pointing out Alhazred's success at causing the islands to turn on each other, and eliminating the parents is a 'strategem worthy of even himself'.

    I'm still not sure how much Mordack was involved in the plans... Was he fully in on it? Or did Alhazred (and/or Shadrack) just take advantage of Alhazred's friendship/insubordination to Mordack, in an attempt to get rid of a loose end. We know in both versions of the letter, the idea was at least Shadrack's idea to get rid of Cassima (...i.e. "recommended/adviced").

    Also Shadrack seems to see cassima as actively 'meddling' into his own plans in the Companion (whereas in the game, he seems to just warn that she could pose a threat to Alhazred if not dealt with).


    Cousin (or evil Uncle) Ralphy, everyone calls him Bob... He could be Graham's long lost brother?

    Ralphy is actually Larry Loveage's counterpart - I was looking for info on a street fighter porn parody after reading about it on one of the comments at Kotaku. However, i ended up finding info on a new LSL porn parody entitled "Leisure Suit Ralphy.".

    Anyway, what goes with well with graham crackers? That should be Graham's long lost brother or sister's (to mirror Prince Alexander's and Princess Rosella's origin) name.

  • Saltine? Cookie? Biscuit? Weetabix? Wafer? Cracker? Ritz? Ryvita? Triscuit? Nips? Goldfish? Krisp? Chip? Toast?

    Smore? Marshmellow? Chocolate?

  • @BagginsKQ said: Saltine? Cookie? Biscuit? Weetabix? Wafer? Cracker? Ritz? Ryvita? Triscuit? Nips? Goldfish? Krisp? Chip? Toast?

    Smore? Marshmellow? Chocolate?

    Saltine sounds good

  • In Wizard's Quest 3, he can join some pirates...

    He becomes the Captain known as Salty Bob...

  • @BagginsKQ said: In Wizard's Quest 3, he can join some pirates...

    He becomes the Captain known as Salty Bob...

    In part 4, he is wisked away to another land where he has to aid a wicked witch in getting a unicorn. He is known as the salty horse.

  • I was messing around with ScummVM and DOSBox earlier, and subsequently farting around in King's Quest VI... and I realize just how many hotspots the game has. I'm not sure TTG would do their KQ game justice if they don't have a bazillion unnecessary hotspots.

    Take this screen for example:x8OKe.png


    What's it's purpose? It's a crossroads between four other screens (2 outside, and 2 shops), and one NPC to talk to. Yet there are a ton of things which the examine cursor gives separate and unique responses for. Among some I may have missed, there are:


    [LIST]
    [*]the northern archway,
    [*]the door of the bookstore,
    [*]the door of the pawn shop,
    [*]the bookstore sign,
    [*]the pawn shop sign,
    [*]the bookstore window,
    [*]the pawn shop window,
    [*]the bookstore building,
    [*]the pawn shop building
    [*]the shutters,
    [*]the trees,
    [*]the bookstore's second floor windows,
    [*]the hanging red pants ,
    [*]a villager when seen at a second floor window,
    [*]the short fat pot,
    [*]the tall thin vase,
    [*]the short round pot on the box,
    [*]the big box which has the pot on it,
    [*]the gourd-shaped jugs,
    [*]the lamp peddler,
    [*]the lamp peddler's pole of lamps,
    [*]the general vicinity,
    [*]and Alexander, himself.
    [/LIST]
    Now, I could have chosen to use the inside of the pawn shop as an example (as it surely has more to look at) but this particular screen--aside from having the lamp peddler and (eventually) the invisible ink bottle--is of no real consequence besides to get from one screen to another. The fact that it still has a bunch of different stuff to click on says something about the quality of Sierra's games, imo... and I've only listed what you can examine, and have not included what you can interact with using the other cursors.

  • @Chyron8472 said: I was messing around with ScummVM and DOSBox earlier, and subsequently farting around in King's Quest VI... and I realize just how many hotspots the game has. I'm not sure TTG would do their KQ game justice if they don't have a bazillion unnecessary hotspots.

    Take this screen for example:x8OKe.png


    What's it's purpose? It's a crossroads between four other screens (2 outside, and 2 shops), and one NPC to talk to. Yet there are a ton of things which the examine cursor gives separate and unique responses for. Among some I may have missed, there are:


    [LIST]
    [*]the northern archway,
    [*]the door of the bookstore,
    [*]the door of the pawn shop,
    [*]the bookstore sign,
    [*]the pawn shop sign,
    [*]the bookstore window,
    [*]the pawn shop window,
    [*]the bookstore building,
    [*]the pawn shop building
    [*]the shutters,
    [*]the trees,
    [*]the bookstore's second floor windows,
    [*]the hanging red pants ,
    [*]a villager when seen at a second floor window,
    [*]the short fat pot,
    [*]the tall thin vase,
    [*]the short round pot on the box,
    [*]the big box which has the pot on it,
    [*]the gourd-shaped jugs,
    [*]the lamp peddler,
    [*]the lamp peddler's pole of lamps,
    [*]the general vicinity,
    [*]and Alexander, himself.
    [/LIST]
    Now, I could have chosen to use the inside of the pawn shop as an example (as it surely has more to look at) but this particular screen--aside from having the lamp peddler and (eventually) the invisible ink bottle--is of no real consequence besides to get from one screen to another. The fact that it still has a bunch of different stuff to click on says something about the quality of Sierra's games, imo... and I've only listed what you can examine, and have not included what you can interact with using the other cursors.

    Yeah having a lot to look at, do, examine, etc was one of the best points of the KQ series. It adds replayability to the first 6 games, to go back and look at and listen to descriptions of stuff you never bothered with your first time around. I'd argue SQ did it better, though, at least SQ4.

  • Although KQ6 is actually somewhat of the exception to most KQ games. Most hardly contain as much extra narrative stuff.

    KQ5 had nearly the same (5 or more things to look at, and a generic screen description ) it just wasn't implemented as nicely (don't look at the exact spot you might get a red x instead).

    KQ1 remake also was the last of the KQ games with good amount of extra narration. Right clicking was similar to using eye cursor in that game. Though like KQ5 there are blank spots.

    SQ4 unfortunately also has the same issue as in KQ5 with blank spots and red X.

  • @BagginsKQ said: Although KQ6 is actually somewhat of the exception to most KQ games. Most hardly contain as much extra narrative stuff.

    KQ5 had nearly the same (5 or more things to look at, and a generic screen description ) it just wasn't implemented as nicely (don't look at the exact spot you might get a red x instead).

    KQ1 remake also was the last of the KQ games with good amount of extra narration. Right clicking was similar to using eye cursor in that game. Though like KQ5 there are blank spots.

    SQ4 unfortunately also has the same issue as in KQ5 with blank spots and red X.

    Yes but with SQ4 you had the extra options of being able to taste and smell tons of things on any particular screen.

    How was KQ1SCI the last to have a good amount of extra narration?

    I actually don't mind the lack of a narrator in KQ7 btw. I consider the narrator a bonus, and as graphics were becoming more and more detailed, a narrator was becoming vestigial. I mean in 1984 when "graphics" were simple pixels, a narrator was a necessity because it gave you an idea of what these tiny pixels were supposed to be. But in 1994 when they were using SVGA graphics, a narrator really wasn't necessary and probably seemed a bit archaic.

    I think the use of a narrator (along with the lack of action) would turn off potential new players who are used to modern games.

Add Comment