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Game making!

posted by Baarden on - last edited - Viewed by 902 users

I recently started to write a script for an animated game, which is building up pretty fluently towards a solid and exciting story, eventhough I'm writing in english, and that's not my primary language.

I was just an hour ago smoking a cigar outside, and I had a idea: What if I made the game based on my script, instead of just writing a script for it, and marketing it forward. I am pretty good at drawing, and I immediately called my friend who is even better, and has somewhat of an animator-background.

I've been always a huge fan of the Monkey Island -game serie, especially the third one; 'The Curse of Monkey Island'. I've always found that cartoony, yet not-childish, style very appealing, and I thought if someone happened to know...

- Which softwares did they use making that game?

- Presuming the programs they've used then are outdated, are there any similar, possibly easier to use too, programs?

I've been searching the web, but didn't find any useful info...
Also if you can name any other programs, those would be suitable, useful or even necessary for making a game in such style as CMI, please feel free to flap your gums :)

26 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • question.....what do I have to read and learn if I want to learn how to code?

    I myself want to make a game and I have got WinterMute but obviously its coding which I have NO experience of. Is it Java that I need to learn?

    Tah :D

  • @MI Maniac said: question.....what do I have to read and learn if I want to learn how to code?

    I myself want to make a game and I have got WinterMute but obviously its coding which I have NO experience of. Is it Java that I need to learn?

    Tah :D

    I don't know how complex WinterMute is but when I used AGS, I found several sources of online help (FAQs, guides, forums etc.). I don't think you need to have an extensive knowledge of coding or anything, it's best to just practice and then when you hit a brick wall; search Google for the relevant information.

  • My rule of thumb: Dive in headfirst. Get help when you need it.

  • In my most successful project, (the one where I actually got something close to being made), I remember I planned the game out thoroughly first.
    The characters, the plot, the mechanics, the enemy design, game modes, objectives ect.

    I did that all on paper, in a quiet neutral area, (the school library! XD).

    I then took all of that, and started to put it into the engine.
    Started with some graphics first. Made some assets from my drawings. Enough to make a basic level or two.

    Then I did some of the gameplay mechanics. Created some objects, programmed in behavours.
    (Always good to start with the main character first. Get him moving, animating, doing basic functions. Then create some basic things for him to interact with. In adventure game context, that would be I don't know, maybe a guy to talk to, a few objects to pick up, something to combine ect.)

    If you need help, look for it online. Loads of guides out there. Don't be afraid to copy down code and deconstruct it. Learn HOW it works. Learn how the functions work with each other, then tweak it to your taste.

    (If you really can't get it now, just copy the code in and leave it if it works)


    What you need the most is time.

    A lot of time. In large chunks.

    And as I mentioned earlier. Some space. Somewhere to go and work without disruption.

    Maybe even before ANY design work. Do some research.
    Go play some games in that genre. Make some mental, (or physical) notes on what you like and don't like.

    Then you use that as a framework to build your design over.

    (You see people. I know HOW to make things. I just lack discipline and somewhere good to work these days! XD)

  • @RetroVortex said: (You see people. I know HOW to make things. I just lack discipline and somewhere good to work these days! XD)

    Ah, a man after my own heart. I'm very much the same - a lot of abandoned concepts lying around. Really should get back to some of them, I'm pretty sure some of them didn't suck that much...

  • @Darth Marsden said: Ah, a man after my own heart. I'm very much the same - a lot of abandoned concepts lying around. Really should get back to some of them, I'm pretty sure some of them didn't suck that much...

    Ditto.

  • Speaking of game making, the final set of ten backgrounds is getting inked this week.

  • I do know that prior knowledge of programming languages, especially OOP languages, help in learning new languages.

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    Jennifer Moderator

    There's another plus for using the Wintermute engine now. :D

    Wintermute Lite is being added to ScummVM as part of the Google Summer of Code program. They also are planning on adding video support to the engine for ScummVM (which is something not in the regular Wintermute Lite engine). :)

    This will make games made with Wintermute Lite compatible on the very large range of platforms that ScummVM supports (which is a lot :D)

  • @Jennifer said:
    This will make games made with Wintermute Lite compatible on the very large range of platforms that ScummVM supports (which is a lot :D)

    Madre de Dios!

    That's fantastic news!
    I've been waiting for the Visionaire-guys to complete the Mac version of their engine, but I just recently realized that with Visionaire you can only make games for PC, and at least OSX support would be nice.

    I really hope this'll not take too long to finish :P

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