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New Direction is Best

posted by Sleeq on - last edited - Viewed by 1.3K users

First time poster here!

I'm now 31 and I've played almost all of Sierra's games since I was a kid (yes even Larry... we were cool back then... and how else do you think I learned how to play Blackjack!)

I loved every moment of these games and they really challenged the mind. They hold a special place in my heart.

However, we should get with the times.

King's Quest is a controversial series due to the loyal fanbase; I know it will be hard to please everyone. But I don't think going for a 2D classic game will cut it this time.

I think going for a 3D (please don't kill me) Mask of Eternity style'd game is the way to go, and adding more classic elements from the older games into it.

Think about it; a POLISHED free roam 3D game with classic item hunt and use mechanics with MINOR or REDUCED action sequences with a little more mature themes/humor would be pretty good if pulled off.

I don't want to feel nostalgic; if I want to I'll just replay the games. I want a new direction.

As far as puzzles, they should be challenging but fair. No dead-ends, but death sequences are ok (to provide a sense of urgency).

The best games this new generation for me were Demon's Souls & Dark Souls, simply because the mechanics of minimal plot, addictive combat, and challenge created a great formula. Every mistake you made was yours and you learned from it.

So putting this philosophy into the new game would surely be helpful.

Sorry for the long post!

118 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • a classic inventory system with classic adventure-style puzzles


    It had the classic inventory system (actually more like KQ7 than say KQ6 inventory style), with click item on something else adventure-style puzzles.

    They just feel so far apart from each other, since so much exploration and combat occured in inbetween the puzzles themselves.

    It also included alot of Torin's Passage style maze/trap/lava puzzle and chess-like puzzles (kinda like the ones in Zork series)... Which weren't common in any earlier KQ game (only KQ6 had its trap maze, but it was different)...

    He has no dialogue, no character arc, and barely any on-screen time other than the intro and the very end when he finally speaks to you.

    Actually he has a scene in nearly every world of the game. In which he has dialogue in those scenes. Those scenes also built up a character arc for him. There is about 7-8 appearances total through the game, which develop his character.

    You might have overlooked these scenes, they are optional for the most part. They require you clicking on the right place, or being in the right place.

    His backstory is discussed quite a bit in several other scenes with the Archon Uriel (similar to learning information from the Oracles in previous games), the Oracle of the Tree, and the marble archons near the end of the game. As well as information about Lucreto given you by the Henchmen you encounter throughout the game.

    He has about as many appearances than Malicia had in KQ7 (About five to seven total; 2-3 underground, twice in her house, once in ooga booga, and the ending), or more than Mordack had in KQ5 (3 total)... ...or really more than you saw Alhazred in KQ6 (four total, two cutscenes (with Shamir in his office), a meeting with him, and ending sequence)!

    Infact, given his number of appearances, and how many other characters discuss him and his backstory. He is probably one of the most developed villain characters in the entire King's Quest series (without having to resort to any expanded universe material). He is probably as developed as Alhazred and Malicia; while Alhazred didn't have as many appearances, there is alot of characters who refer to him, and give us backstory for him (similar in fashion to Lucreto in this way).

    Malicia's background is somewhat explained in the game, but mostly comes from material only mentioned in the official Hintbook. But she does get quite a bit of interaction with many of the characters in the game, and many are able to tell you about her. So she's up there with Lucreto and Alhazred as far as involvement in the game world past and present as mentioned in the game by most of the characters (so you still don't have to go to any outside source to learn alot about her). Unfortunately she's a rather silly villain :p...

    Not even Mordack, Hagatha, or Manannan got that much background as they do, don't get as many characters referring to their involvement in the world (with those latter two you have to at least go into the manuals to get their backstories). I guess Manannan does a little, as you learn by listening into animal conversations (but most of the animals all state the same thing about him).

    Lolotte, has good four to five interactions with the main character, spread throughout entire KQ4, and also one of the more developed villains the series. We know some of her background via interactions with Seven Dwarfs and Genesta. But other than that, she isn't brought into the plot by most other characters in any fashion, to the extent that Lucreto or Alhazred received.

  • I'm pretty neutral in this debate; as I've said before, I'm just interested in seeing a fresh take on King's Quest. But a thought crossed my mind that might illuminate everyone's perspective on the matter. Do these things, in any order you like:

    1) Watch the MGM "The Wizard of Oz" with Judy Garland

    2) Watch the Disney "Return to Oz" with Fairuza Balk

    Same fictional universe. Some of the same characters. I would even argue that both films have their strong points. But they are VERY different in tone and sensibility; they were made at different times by different people, with different technologies at hand.

    3) Ask yourself -- is either of these films more "Oz" than the other?

  • Yeah, but there are only the two Oz movies--in the case of KQ, we have 5, arguably even 6 or 7 entries that share a common light-hearted tone, and one that doesn't. The argument that we're disputing is essentially arguing in favor of taking the one out of 8 games with a darker tone and using that as a jumping off point for the new game that is supposed to appeal to old fans and new players alike. It doesn't make sense.

  • Even KQ8 is relatively lighthearted compared to other games in the series, and in comparison to other game series. Roberta placed her kind of inherent sillyness or whimsy into most of the good characters an even into some of the lesser villains. Some argue that KQ3 is the darkest in someways. Even KQ4 in some ways.

    Although I'd argue it is the fan games try to make the series dark and "gritty". :p.

  • I wouldn't call any of AGDI or IA's games dark at all. KQ2+ is moody at best. But not dark or gritty. It's very whimsical in more places than not and also very storybook-colourful. Even TSL has light-hearted moments. But the core plot is definitely dark in that case.

  • @Lambonius said: Yeah, but there are only the two Oz movies--in the case of KQ, we have 5, arguably even 6 or 7 entries that share a common light-hearted tone, and one that doesn't. The argument that we're disputing is essentially arguing in favor of taking the one out of 8 games with a darker tone and using that as a jumping off point for the new game that is supposed to appeal to old fans and new players alike. It doesn't make sense.

    The point I was trying to make is that there should be room in any fictional universe for different interpretations of the source material. There should be something recognizably consistent at the heart of each work, but "tone" isn't really the distinguishing factor some people seem to think it is.

    I think there's room in the KQ world for Graham to have an adventure where he helps rescue a mama bunny's children from a thicket, as well as one where he rescues his own children from an evil wizard. And either of those stories could be told in a light-hearted vein (bumbling wizard) or dark (bunny-devouring grues.) I don't think I'd expect or want to see a story where Graham kidnaps and kills someone else's children; that seems to me TOO dark for KQ, even if he were under a spell of some kind.

  • Graham kidnaps and kills someone else's children; that seems to me TOO dark for KQ, even if he were under a spell of some kind.

    Already happened, in KQ3 ;) He sent up to 17 young virgins to their deaths to be sacrificed to the three-headed dragon! I would have to assume they were 'someone' else's children!

  • @BagginsKQ said: Already happened, in KQ3 ;) He sent up to 17 young virgins to their deaths to be sacrificed to the three-headed dragon! I would have to assume they were 'someone' else's children!

    I dunno, that Graham gets around a lot and he works awfully fast. How long is it between the time he forces his way into Valanice's tower and the time he kisses her? About 30 seconds? We know what that King is Questing for, awwwwyeah.

  • One sacrifice a year, Rosella is the last. That's up to 18 maidens total, if the dragon showed up right after Alexander was kidnapped!

  • I'm starting to find the relentless MoE-is-awesome conversation rather boring.

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