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New Direction is Best

posted by Sleeq on - last edited - Viewed by 842 users

First time poster here!

I'm now 31 and I've played almost all of Sierra's games since I was a kid (yes even Larry... we were cool back then... and how else do you think I learned how to play Blackjack!)

I loved every moment of these games and they really challenged the mind. They hold a special place in my heart.

However, we should get with the times.

King's Quest is a controversial series due to the loyal fanbase; I know it will be hard to please everyone. But I don't think going for a 2D classic game will cut it this time.

I think going for a 3D (please don't kill me) Mask of Eternity style'd game is the way to go, and adding more classic elements from the older games into it.

Think about it; a POLISHED free roam 3D game with classic item hunt and use mechanics with MINOR or REDUCED action sequences with a little more mature themes/humor would be pretty good if pulled off.

I don't want to feel nostalgic; if I want to I'll just replay the games. I want a new direction.

As far as puzzles, they should be challenging but fair. No dead-ends, but death sequences are ok (to provide a sense of urgency).

The best games this new generation for me were Demon's Souls & Dark Souls, simply because the mechanics of minimal plot, addictive combat, and challenge created a great formula. Every mistake you made was yours and you learned from it.

So putting this philosophy into the new game would surely be helpful.

Sorry for the long post!

118 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • It may have Dark and Gritty themes, but they really don't take themselves too seriously. They managed to combine Lovecraftian themes, vampires and other Eastern European horror story elements without going all over-the-top melodramatic with them. The game retained its sense of humor, cheekiness and fun while dealing with a darker setting.


    Bt

  • ^ true... so why was my comment about the reboot being dark but retain all the classic elements (such as QG4) shunned?

  • Because Dark Elements really have no place in a King's Quest game. Not to the extent at which QFGIV had them. It's a cheap gimmick used these days to make a game "more mature". People have been trying to shoe-horn darker elements on to KQ's with mixed results for a long time.

    A "dark" King's Quest... isn't King's Quest. As I've said before, why do you want something new with an old name on it?


    Bt

  • Agreed, Bt.

    Plus, ALL of the QFG games had undertones of dark fantasy and violence--QFG4 just brought that to the forefront more than the others did. But as Bt mentioned, it's also a damn funny game, arguably the funniest in the series. It really wasn't as big a departure as you're making it out to be.

  • It was also the nature of QFG to explore different atmospheres as well as locales in every game. King's Quest was not like this.

  • So KQ5 had only one locale? Except for Kq1, all other KQ games had you travel to different realms outside Daventry and multiple locales. i don't get your statement.

    You also make it sound like KQ had no seriousness at all. It does; but it also has it's share of humor and lightheartedness, not unlike QfG in my opinion.

  • QFG was about a single atmosphere, and locality for each game.

    KQ was about exploring new locales in each game as well. Daventry was often used as a starting point or ending point. But the primary focus was on a new locale or locales.

    As far as atmosphere, a single KQ took what I'll describe as the 'theme park' approach. That different sections of each land represented a diffented 'atmosphere'.

    KQ6-8 made the 'theme park' approach even more seperated in that each island in KQ6, and each land in KQ7 and KQ8 shared different distinct themes and atmospheres.

    KQ5 can be described as breaking things up in a 'theme park' manner as well. In that it broke up thematic locations such as the Endless Desert, the Dark Forest, Serenia proper, the Mountains, the beach and ocean, and the Mordack's Island.

    In the earliest games its a little less noticeable but even exist their as well. KQ1 had its main land, its Land of the Clouds, its land of the leprechauns. In the remake it added a darker part of the forest, and lighter parts of the forest with different atmosphers in both.

    In KQ2, you had themes surrounding the three keys to unlock the doors. The undersea region, the mountain, and finally the 'darker' Dracula's island sequence. But Kolyma as a whole was pretty similar in atmosphere, outside of those sequences. There are a couple of other places within the land of note, that offer their own unique theme. Such as Grandma's House, or the Antique store, etc.

    Then you jump into the Enchanted Islands where atmosphere changes.

    In KQ3, you have the desert, main Llewdor (which has several areas of note with varying themes), the pirate sequence across the ocean, the beach and mountains, and finally Daventry, and Cloudland. But the latter two areas hearken back to the original KQ1.

    In KQ4 you had distinct dark forest areas, that get progressively darker, as you head east, and areas of meadowland, the haunted house and graveyard, the ocean, the desert island, Genesta's Island, the swamp. The mountains and Lollotes' Castle. Each with a unique theme. This is probably the first game to start developing more of a 'theme park' style land development, but its not as clearly divided as later games in the series are.

  • @Sleeq said: Something occurred to me just now;

    Quest for Glory IV was the "darkest" of the series, yet it is considered by fans the best of the 5 games (or tied with QfG1).

    It had dark mature themes yet retained all the attributes that made the series famous.

    Does this count for anything in my "dark/gritty" argument?



    Why are you not getting that this isn't about dark/gritty games in general but about King's Quest in particular, ie. that what QFG was is irrelevant to what KQ should be? The Dig was dark and gritty, so Monkey Island should have been dark and gritty, too?

    Baggins makes a good point about how there was some differentiation in tone or feel of different areas in each (or most) of the games, and I think that's a good way to go.

    Personally, and this is probably semantics, I never found anything "dark" or "gritty" in any KQ ever -- rather I would describe things like Mordack's castle and the graveyard in KQ4 and even the underworld in KQ6 as "spooky". Having a spooky section in the new game would be fine with me. I don't think anyone's suggesting that there be a cheesy or sappy fairy tale scene around every damn corner.

  • @Sleeq said: So KQ5 had only one locale? Except for Kq1, all other KQ games had you travel to different realms outside Daventry and multiple locales. i don't get your statement.



    You completely missed the point. I'm not really talking about locales. QFG's whole shtick was that each game explored a different atmosphere and style. This was reflected in the locales it chose in each game. King's Quest has pretty much always been fantasy. I think KQ6 and KQ7 were the only ones to explore areas we've never seen before. But even KQ6, while being influenced by Arabian mythology and atmosphere is still very classic fantasy. And KQ7, while a little crazy and zany, is still exploring and journeying through a strange fantasy land with magical creatures and places. It's never gone beyond this.

    I know that KQ5 explored a series of locales, one of the things I love about it. KQ3 did as well. But it never changed in tone throughout the entire series.

    You also make it sound like KQ had no seriousness at all. It does; but it also has it's share of humor and lightheartedness, not unlike QfG in my opinion.

    Now you're just picking at straws. I don't think any of us are saying there's no humour. In fact we're defending the fact that it has humour. They were merely stating that QFG is one of the funniest Sierra series they ever put out and that the "darkness" of QFG4 was more tounge-in-cheek than actual grit. It was still funny. Because that was its thing. It stuck to what it was known for. That's the whole point we're trying to make here.

  • King's Quest has pretty much always been fantasy.


    Technically "fairy tales", "myths", "literary classics" ("horror" was sometimes an inspiration), and 'legends" with a few 'legendary epics' thrown in. These are subcategories under 'fantasy' but are a might more specific.

    But even KQ6, while being influenced by Arabian mythology and atmosphere is still very classic fantasy.

    To be perfectly honest Arabian mythology only had some minor influence on one island in KQ6, Isle of the Crown (even there it was fairly marginal).

    Every other island was based on a number of things including sort of pseudo-French motif on the Isle of the Beast, the Greco-Roman/Cretian on the Isle of Sacred Mountain... Alice and Wonderland for the Isle of Wonder... 18th century romantic concept of 'druidic culture' on the Isle of Mists... Realm of the Dead is a combination of few different sources, but relies more on a H.R. Giger style theme.

    Like I said before KQ especially the later games from KQ5 up to KQ8 rely more on a series of themed areas, based on multiple cultural influence.

    KQ7 has several lands all based on different cultural themes each uniquely divided, including Meso-American in the Desert. Some Greco-Roman aspects in the Bountfiul Woods. Ooga Booga is sort of Tim Burtonesque with some Washington Irving thrown in. Falderal/Nonsense Land is more of a "Looking Glass/Wonderland or Oz" with some other influences thrown in (Chicken Little for example). Fairy Court is a bit of medieval and renaisance legends. Etc...

    BTW, least you forget, KQ5's desert region is largely inspired off of Arabian Nights tales as well with a touch of Petra. The Dark Forest is motif in various fairy tales. Serenia itself is loosely central European in style.

    Now you're just picking at straws. I don't think any of us are saying there's no humour. In fact we're defending the fact that it has humour. They were merely stating that QFG is one of the funniest Sierra series they ever put out and that the "darkness" of QFG4 was more tounge-in-cheek than actual grit. It was still funny. Because that was its thing. It stuck to what it was known for. That's the whole point we're trying to make here.

    You are right... Quest for Glory is about punning and joke making in nearly every line of diologue. It never really took itself serious at all.

    King's Quest was quite the oposite in many ways. With the main characters and narrator often taking everything serious. While humor exists, it's not the focus of the story itself. At least the main characters tend to treat the events they are in on a serious note.

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