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Stephen King thread

posted by Noname215 on - last edited - Viewed by 870 users

I felt like starting a thread about this author because I would like to give some thoughts on his upcoming novel, Joyland, to be distributed by Hard Case Crime.

From what I have read, a certain someone who had read the book ahead of publication stated that the book had made him cry. Usually, when you know how moved you are by a certain book or movie, you know that that movie or book will be a success. I also like the fact that he is combining a whodunnit, a story of growing up, a tragedy, and a ghost story all in one. I am very looking forward to the release of this novel, and I will make sure that I am one of the first buyers. Dr. Sleep is another definite buy for me.

Please don’t spam me.

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  • I expected to have another comment by now. Hmm...

  • @Noname215 said: I expected to have another comment by now. Hmm...

    Looks like you met your own expectations.

    A lot of his new stuff is pretty meh, but the classics remain just that. Let's face it, he ALWAYS has a new book coming out. I recall them joking about that in the 90's, but he's just spewing it out constantly now. I'm really not surprised I've heard nothing about this book.

    I'm sure you can tell by the DVD pictures, that I'm a fan(I own almost every adaptation, even though they generally aren't very good). I just don't read a lot anymore and I long ago gave up trying to read at the pace he's writing.

  • I've been seriously meaning to check out his "Dark Tower" series for years now, after I read part of "Book IV: Wizard and Glass". It was so wacky. Now I find out that he wrote a Book 4.5 to Dark Tower, called "The Wind Through The Keyhole".

    After I finish my reread of Harry Potter (and the super-fan sequel books I recently discovered, called "James Potter"), I'm hitting up my library for the Dark Tower series.

  • @Johro said:

    A lot of his new stuff is pretty meh, but the classics remain just that. Let's face it, he ALWAYS has a new book coming out. I recall them joking about that in the 90's, but he's just spewing it out constantly now. I'm really not surprised I've heard nothing about this book.

    I'm sure you can tell by the DVD pictures, that I'm a fan(I own almost every adaptation, even though they generally aren't very good). I just don't read a lot anymore and I long ago gave up trying to read at the pace he's writing.

    Actually, I really liked 11/22/63. It took me 8 months to finish it, and it was pretty compelling. Also, there are some good Stephen King adaptations and there are some shit ones.

    Good ones:
    Stand By Me
    Misery
    ‘Salem’s Lot
    Bag of Bones
    The Shawshank Redemption
    The Green Mile
    The Shining
    Children of the Corn
    Silver Bullet
    Carrie
    Cujo
    The Dead Zone
    Pet Sematary
    Christine
    Firestarter
    The Running Man (Bachman book)
    The Stand
    1408
    The Tommyknockers
    Secret Window

    Shit ones:
    Maximum Overdrive
    Creepshow
    All of the sequels to Children of the Corn
    Sometimes They Come Back and all of it’s sequels
    It
    Quicksilver Highway
    The Langoliers
    The Mangler
    Sleepwalkers
    The Lawnmower Man
    The Mist
    Dreamcatcher
    Hearts in Atlantis
    Riding The Bullet
    Dolan’s Cadillac

  • The Lawnmower Man wasn't an adaptation, King sued over it and won(his name was removed from the movie).

    Want something controversial? I liked The Shining miniseries better than the Kubrick movie. Why? because I read the book first and Kubrick changed A LOT. I preferred the miniseries that stuck closer to the book.

  • Quote by King on Kubrick’s adaptation:

    Parts of the film are chilling, charged with a relentlessly claustrophobic terror, but others fall flat. Not that religion has to be involved in horror, but a visceral skeptic such as Kubrick just couldn't grasp the sheer inhuman evil of The Overlook Hotel. So he looked, instead, for evil in the characters and made the film into a domestic tragedy with only vaguely supernatural overtones. That was the basic flaw: because he couldn't believe, he couldn't make the film believable to others. What's basically wrong with Kubrick's version of The Shining is that it's a film by a man who thinks too much and feels too little; and that's why, for all its virtuoso effects, it never gets you by the throat and hangs on the way real horror should.

    This just about sums it up.

  • The Shining was good from an artistic standpoint, but from a storytelling standpoint it was terrible.

  • @Secret Fawful said: The Shining was good from an artistic standpoint

    Oh it was great at that. Very memorable with it's visuals, design, and cinematography. I just felt disappointed with the story that was told.

  • Gary Busey got his ass handed to him by a werewolf.

  • I have issues with a movie where the black guy dies first....near the end of the movie.

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