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  • One of the best off-with-their-heads announcements I've ever seen. I think, though, that when a company is both hiring in one area and getting rid of people in another, it really ought to give the soon-to-be-reduced a chance to demonstrate if they can be productive in the growing area. A lot of executives dismiss this option a bit too quickly. If you're into C++ but the company is moving towards Java or Objective C, it isn't that much of a stretch.

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    puzzlebox Telltale Staff

    @WarpSpeed said: One of the best off-with-their-heads announcements I've ever seen. I think, though, that when a company is both hiring in one area and getting rid of people in another, it really ought to give the soon-to-be-reduced a chance to demonstrate if they can be productive in the growing area. A lot of executives dismiss this option a bit too quickly. If you're into C++ but the company is moving towards Java or Objective C, it isn't that much of a stretch.

    That's one of the reasons I dislike the US "at will" employment law. In Australia for example, the company would actively look to move you into another role you're capable of performing. Otherwise, they pay you a nice redundancy package to see you on your way.

  • @puzzlebox said: That's one of the reasons I dislike the US "at will" employment law. In Australia for example, the company would actively look to move you into another role you're capable of performing. Otherwise, they pay you a nice redundancy package to see you on your way.

    The U.S. has something called the WARN Act that applies to mass layoffs, saying you need to give employees 60 days notice prior to a layoff (or 60 days' pay usually suffices). That may apply here. (I don't know specifics.)

    In theory, the ease of firing people makes it easier to get hired in the first place, as employers are more willing to take a chance on you, but it's certainly a lot easier to get nervous during tough times.

  • @WarpSpeed said: The U.S. has something called the WARN Act that applies to mass layoffs, saying you need to give employees 60 days notice prior to a layoff (or 60 days' pay usually suffices). That may apply here. (I don't know specifics.)

    In theory, the ease of firing people makes it easier to get hired in the first place, as employers are more willing to take a chance on you, but it's certainly a lot easier to get nervous during tough times.

    Yeah, I think there's something like that. I know my dad got laid off about ten years ago and because of the 60 day warning period he got another job before he even had to leave the first one. Then the new company bought the office building that he had been working in (same floor, everything). He even got the same office. Didn't miss a day of work.

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