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They Stole Max's Brain!

posted by YoshiRoll on - last edited - Viewed by 642 users

Could it be that the brain in Skunkape's spaceship from episode 1 was Max's brain from the future? Will that be the the cliffhanger for episode 2?

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  • @ryannumber1gamer said: So what your saying is in a The Twlight Zone episode It's a good life. There's a giant space ape who steals a kid's brain and then the kid's dog sidekick comes and throws a person called Sammun-Mak's brain into the kid's body which then gives Sammun-Mak powers. Then when the dog sidekick is about to save the kid then Sammun-Mak changes the world so he can be king. So then the kid tricks the dog sidekick to stop Sammun-Mak which then ends with the Dog fighting a space ape and a crazy king which then ends with the world going by to normal and then loads of Sam clones oops i mean loads of dog sidekick clones come and attack them?

    Wow Sam & Max used a lot from The Twlight Zone in this episode.



    I know you're probably being facetious but don't mock him for seeing a similarity (the similarity being both 303 and that episode feature a child with god-like powers) in a Twilight Zone episode when the whole season is inspired by that series. :P

    I'm a huge Twilight Zone nerd so indulge me for a moment; "It's a Good Life" was one of the series' most famous episodes, and it revolves around a town called Peaksville. A six-year-old boy lives there, named Anthony, and Anthony has had god-like powers since birth. He's separated Peaksville from the rest of the world, so much that it may not even be a part of Earth anymore. He can manipulate the weather, transform people and objects, read the minds of everyone around him, send others to a place called "the cornfield" (it's implied this actually just wipes them out of existence), and basically bend reality to his will. As a result he has complete control over Peaksville and everyone living there, and all the adults are absolutely terrified of him. But it's not because Anthony is evil, he's just a six-year-old kid who doesn't know any better. He's too young to understand his own tyrannical actions.
    There becomes an interesting moral dilemma towards the end of the episode, where a man says they should just kill Anthony and end this.
    But is that the right thing to do? Can you really kill a child, even one that's so powerful he's a danger to everyone around him? He's not old enough, his brain hasn't grown enough, to comprehend what he's doing is wrong. Is it really his fault, can you really justify taking away a child's life for the sake of everyone else around him?

    The creepy concept of a town under the rule of a realty-altering child along with that moral question is what's made it one of The Twilight Zone's most well-known and popular episodes. I really recommend watching it sometime if you've never seen it.
    "It's a Good Life" has been referenced and parodied in a number of other television shows and cartoons, notably in the latter category The Simpsons, Johnny Bravo (along with the episodes "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet" and "Living Doll"), and the Sam & Max animated series! In the Sam & Max episode "The Trouble With Gary", Gary and his powers are based on Anthony. The Sam & Max cartoon also parodied The Twilight Zone episode "The Invaders" in its episode of the same name.
    Seems like Sam & Max has had a connection with The Twilight Zone for quite a long time. Perhaps having it as an overall theme of The Devil's Playhouse was inevitable? :3

  • @Tora Newton Y. said: I know you're probably being facetious but don't mock him for seeing a similarity (the similarity being both 303 and that episode feature a child with god-like powers) in a Twilight Zone episode when the whole season is inspired by that series. :P

    I'm a huge Twilight Zone nerd so indulge me for a moment; "It's a Good Life" was one of the series' most famous episodes, and it revolves around a town called Peaksville. A six-year-old boy lives there, named Anthony, and Anthony has had god-like powers since birth. He's separated Peaksville from the rest of the world, so much that it may not even be a part of Earth anymore. He can manipulate the weather, transform people and objects, read the minds of everyone around him, send others to a place called "the cornfield" (it's implied this actually just wipes them out of existence), and basically bend reality to his will. As a result he has complete control over Peaksville and everyone living there, and all the adults are absolutely terrified of him. But it's not because Anthony is evil, he's just a six-year-old kid who doesn't know any better. He's too young to understand his own tyrannical actions.
    There becomes an interesting moral dilemma towards the end of the episode, where a man says they should just kill Anthony and end this.
    But is that the right thing to do? Can you really kill a child, even one that's so powerful he's a danger to everyone around him? He's not old enough, his brain hasn't grown enough, to comprehend what he's doing is wrong. Is it really his fault, can you really justify taking away a child's life for the sake of everyone else around him?

    The creepy concept of a town under the rule of a realty-altering child along with that moral question is what's made it one of The Twilight Zone's most well-known and popular episodes. I really recommend watching it sometime if you've never seen it.
    "It's a Good Life" has been referenced and parodied in a number of other television shows and cartoons, notably in the latter category The Simpsons, Johnny Bravo (along with the episodes "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet" and "Living Doll"), and the Sam & Max animated series! In the Sam & Max episode "The Trouble With Gary", Gary and his powers are based on Anthony. The Sam & Max cartoon also parodied The Twilight Zone episode "The Invaders" in its episode of the same name.
    Seems like Sam & Max has had a connection with The Twilight Zone for quite a long time. Perhaps having it as an overall theme of The Devil's Playhouse was inevitable? :3



    I was not trying to mock him, I was just joking. But while you can say Max is a child (Or at least acts like one) He does not really control anyone in the season. Sam does in Episode 5 using Ariel Projection to control Sam clones. I can see where Coolsome got the idea because i do remember the episode of Johnny Bravo where they did a full episode like the Twlight Zone. It had a narrator and 3 stories to it. I remember 2 of the stories. One was based on the one where a guy says theres a monster on the plane, the second was based on It's a wonderful life. I know The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror episodes are great for episodes based on Twlight zone too.

  • @ryannumber1gamer said: I was not trying to mock him, I was just joking. But while you can say Max is a child (Or at least acts like one) He does not really control anyone in the season. Sam does in Episode 5 using Ariel Projection to control Sam clones. I can see where Coolsome got the idea because i remember an episode of Johnny Bravo where they did a full episode like the Twlight Zone. It had a narrator and 3 stories to it. I remember 2 of the stories. One was based on the one where a guy says theres a monster on the plane, the second was based on It's a wonderful life. Simpsons Treehouse of Horror episodes are great for episodes based on Twlight zone too.



    I didn't mean "control" in that sense. Are you ESL? (Is English not your first language?)
    Yes, Johnny Bravo had an episode with 3 stories based on Twilight Zone episodes! I remember the narrator in that episode called it "The Place Where Normal Things Don't Happen Very Often", LOL. :p
    The three episodes they based the stories on were "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet", "Living Doll" (oh hi, inspiration for Charlie Ho-Tep), and "It's a Good Life."
    The Simpsons' Treehouse of Horror II parodied "It's a Good Life", but throughout the years, Treehouse of Horror has parodied and referenced lots of Twilight Zone episodes! :cool:

  • Yes English is my first language. What was the name of the Johnny Bravo episode based on It's a wonderful life? Also i just remembered something that was based on Twlight Zone. The Scary Door on Futurama!

  • @ryannumber1gamer said: Yes English is my first language. What was the name of the Johnny Bravo episode based on It's a wonderful life? Also i just remembered something that was based on Twlight Zone. The Scary Door on Futurama!



    Alright, I thought from the way you misinterpreted me, you might be ESL.
    Also the episode is called "It's a Good Life", you're thinking of the movie "It's a Wonderful Life", which is completely different, LOL.
    The Johnny Bravo episodes were "The Man Who Cried Clown" (based on "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet"), "Johnny, Real Good" (based on "It's a Good Life"), and "Little Talky Tabitha" (based on "Living Doll").

    Yes, I LOVE The Scary Door parodies! :p I remember one even spoofed the episode "Time Enough to Last", which is one of my favorites.

  • I have actually never watched that episode. I do remember the New Twilight Zone episode based on it: "The Toys of Caliban". It was TERRIFYING.

  • @Tora Newton Y. said: Yes, I LOVE The Scary Door parodies! I remember one even spoofed the episode "Time Enough to Last", which is one of my favorites.



    Yeah that one was great. :D

  • @crfh said: I have actually never watched that episode. I do remember the New Twilight Zone episode based on it: "The Toys of Caliban". It was TERRIFYING.



    Man... even for all my geekiness over the original series, I've never watched either of the newer Twilight Zone series from 1985 or 2002.
    I guess I just can't bring myself to watch them, I love Mr. Serling too much! >n<;

  • My point was both Sammun-Mak and Anthony where spoiled brats like most kids but had godly powers to make everyone indulge there childish whims. It really seems like a conscious decision to use the concept from that episode/short story in Sam and Max.

    Also it was parodied in the TV show of Sam and Max The Trouble with Gary.

  • My point was both Sammun-Mak and Anthony where spoiled brats like most kids but had godly powers to make everyone indulge there childish whims. It really seems like a conscious decision to use the concept from that episode/short story in Sam and Max.

    Also it was parodied in the TV show of Sam and Max The Trouble with Gary.

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