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Limited Choices discussion (merged threads)

posted by ADavidson on - last edited - Viewed by 9.2K users

I was a bit disappointed with the story choices. Reminded me of LA Noir, where most game choices are superficial. If you pick Shawn he still dies the same. Even if the other chosen character died(Doug or Carlie), the other said the same things. And no matter what I said nothing changed story points, like Larry shoving you down even if you side with him. Oh and with Glenn, if you hand the girl the gun he says how can you let people give up but if you refuse he says how can you deny someone's choice! The character's in the game should have the same convictions no matter what you choose, this is unacceptable character development.

Supposedly the choices of Episode 1 greatly affect how everyone views you though... I sure hope the following episodes prove more impressive with the choices, and I realllllly hope it branches out and expands more. For a 2hr game it should have a lot more possibilities.

I know it's only a $5 game, just please don't let me down.

Otherwise, the story itself was awesome, the gameplay is really good and the art style is incredible. Still the best TT game to date! Keep it up guys!

641 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @bazenji said: The story changes based on your actions. You get different dialogue, different cut scenes, different characters, different animations, different skins. You even get different endings. All of this with a game that is heavily animated.

    The thing about the Fallout series? There are almost no cut scenes other than at the beginning and end of the games, and just like war, the cutscenes in the Fallout series never change. While you have different endings, all you get are brief paragraphs telling you what happened. And then the sequels all ignore your choices from other games and invent their own mythology. TWD has ENTIRE DIALOGUE ARCS recounting the choices you made at the end of each game. And subsequent games spontaneously start discussing choices you made in the first game.

    Dragon Age never has new scenes at a location after you've made a significant decision. You can go back and people will recognize what you said, but only in dialogue boxes or floating words over their heads. Only two events are significantly altered within the story based on choices you make, and only one of those has any effect on subsequent games. As for the ending, it's pretty much just multiple choice/Batman gambit.

    The only game with significantly altered and further recognized endings that also includes cutscenes within the game is the Mass Effect series, which is a unique and special game in the industry. It's the only game that surpasses TWD with regard to choice affecting the story, the cinematic nature, and subsequent stories within the series.

    That's it. Only Mass Effect does what TWD does as well as TWD does it, and you can level the same complaints in Mass Effect against its strongest elements. ______ always dies no matter what you do. ______ always dies no matter what you do.

    But that doesn't matter in the long run. The people complaining about why ME3 garnered such ire don't seem to know why that movement was started. People forget that the reason ME3 pissed most of us off isn't because it was sad, although there were people who were angry about that. It was because the game ignored what you did at the end. What you're doing now, by complaining about Carley getting shot and Lilly running away? That's moving the goalposts. That's raising the bar above its competitors. That's changing the rules so that your pet peeve sounds more justified.

    But it's not. You're not complaining about lies you've been told. You're complaining that the game is paying out on the emotional capital you invested. You're complaining that the game is succeeding in what it set out to do.

    The TWD is doing what it said it would do better than almost every other game in the industry. And if the end of the game is a series of cutscenes that reflects your choices from throughout the series, it will have done so better than the final chapter of the premiere interactive narrative in the industry.

    Not bad for an indie developer.

    Never played mass effect and not planning to... Next qestion: Does time of TWD gameplay worth 25$? Definitly not without replay! Also the most people not complaing about characters deaths but about your choices affect game so minor you probably dont notice they did something. I have no problem killing anyone in game. And you call making me upset is game succed? Eh, I am playing games exactly for opposite reasons. TWD could be great movie, but like game its presented in EP3 its suck.. Meybe you are feeling your choices affect game but for me not. I dont need thousands of outcome or sandbox freedom but at least some story develop depend on my choices.. As I already wrote in other thread TWD game has extreme potencial but if EP4,5 will not beed legendary the game will soon become forgotten..

  • I can expect an immature young gaming community to be persistent, inconsiderate, and downright rude when it comes to setting expectations on a game. You see, I remember the days when gaming companies didn't even have a direct line with their consumer base. From that perspective, my expectations on whether the game is on time or not is irrelevant---the proof is in the finished product, which I am interested in telling TellTale my feedback.

    As a fan of quick-time event games from the early laserdisk games (Dragon's Lair, etc) I was looking forward to being immersed in a world where ambiguous moral decisions in a world gone to hell would have to be executed on the fly without much time to discern the long term implications.

    What TellTale has done a remarkable job thus far is to immerse the player into a world and with outstanding scripts, voice acting and character development and direction have allowed me to LIVE in this world and care for the eventual outcome of the characters. It would not surprise me if the quality continues at the current pace that TellTale receives some type of industry recognition/award for this outstanding achievement.

    Where I think TellTale has some opportunities to improve are the branching of the story based on decisions. Early on, it was stressed by TellTale that "Decision Matters". It does, but only in a superficial way. For example, I described some of the early quick-time events such as Dragon's Lair. In that game, decision matters because making the wrong decision ends your life, and in general there was ONLY one correct answer. In Walking Dead, there are many different possible answers, but the opposite is in fact true. There is no wrong answer. The decisions implicates dialog routes along the game but ultimately doesn't change the outcome of the plot/story, which I think is a shame.

    For example, I recall wondering who would be the better ally when choosing Carly or Doug. Now, in Episode III, both are dead--SO IT DOESN'T MATTER. Remember wondering if Kenny wasn't going to take you to the coast based on how you treated his family. Well, he'll let you know that he wasn't happy with your decision, but IT DOESN'T MATTER--you all get to leave with him ANYWAY. There's many more but more of the standouts just to illustrate my point that CHOICE DOESN'T MATTER--at least not yet in this game.

    The game is worth it's price of admission based on the story-telling alone but I'm hoping TellTale uses this feedback to improve a more vast and complex world/story based on YOUR choices--and to date that vision hasn't been realized.

    I understand it would take 3-4 times that folks are already angry about with the delays. But I would LOVE to see a game that TRULY rewards and/or punishes you for your choices, especially if the writing can remain top notch. I'm willing to pay more for the re-playability. I now act with more reckless abandon since it doesn't appear like it matters.

    What say you?

  • I can expect an immature young gaming community to be persistent, inconsiderate, and downright rude when it comes to setting expectations on a game. You see, I remember the days when gaming companies didn't even have a direct line with their consumer base. From that perspective, my expectations on whether the game is on time or not is irrelevant---the proof is in the finished product, which I am interested in telling TellTale my feedback.

    As a fan of quick-time event games from the early laserdisk games (Dragon's Lair, etc) I was looking forward to being immersed in a world where ambiguous moral decisions in a world gone to hell would have to be executed on the fly without much time to discern the long term implications.

    What TellTale has done a remarkable job thus far is to immerse the player into a world and with outstanding scripts, voice acting and character development and direction have allowed me to LIVE in this world and care for the eventual outcome of the characters. It would not surprise me if the quality continues at the current pace that TellTale receives some type of industry recognition/award for this outstanding achievement.

    Where I think TellTale has some opportunities to improve are the branching of the story based on decisions. Early on, it was stressed by TellTale that "Decision Matters". It does, but only in a superficial way. For example, I described some of the early quick-time events such as Dragon's Lair. In that game, decision matters because making the wrong decision ends your life, and in general there was ONLY one correct answer. In Walking Dead, there are many different possible answers, but the opposite is in fact true. There is no wrong answer. The decisions implicates dialog routes along the game but ultimately doesn't change the outcome of the plot/story, which I think is a shame.

    For example, I recall wondering who would be the better ally when choosing Carly or Doug. Now, in Episode III, both are dead--SO IT DOESN'T MATTER. Remember wondering if Kenny wasn't going to take you to the coast based on how you treated his family. Well, he'll let you know that he wasn't happy with your decision, but IT DOESN'T MATTER--you all get to leave with him ANYWAY. There's many more but more of the standouts just to illustrate my point that CHOICE DOESN'T MATTER--at least not yet in this game. Yes we do get dialog SNIPPETS and slight variance of pathing but the plot continues to TellTale's design. I now act with more reckless abandon since it doesn't appear like it matters. I'm guessing TellTale will take certain relationships into account and present different "endings" and that will be it.

    The game is worth it's price of admission based on the story-telling alone but I'm hoping TellTale uses this feedback to improve a more vast and complex world/story based on YOUR choices--and to date that vision hasn't been realized.

    I understand it would take 3-4 times what it currently takes to complete an episode of branching was taken seriously. I work in IT so I understand the implications of my statements. But I would LOVE to see a game that TRULY rewards and/or punishes you for your choices, especially if the writing can remain top notch. I'm willing to pay more for the re-playability. First developer to take quality like this on a true multi-pathing route will be in the history books.

    What say you?

  • @LokiHavok said: For the diagram above:

    1) IS practically infeasible, especially for an indie dev house
    2) THat branching out. Looks to me to appear to be two different games. That's jsut not doable
    3)That's not an accurate depiction of the branching that happens in TWD
    It's just not that simple
    It's more like several small tangents come off off those little balls based of the choices you make, then come back and merge with the next major event.

    Honestly, to the people complaining. Your logic is invalid. You're askin for an Open-World RPG not a graphic adventure game, which TWD has always been advertised as. It's choice system is pretty advanced for that genre.

    Basically you're praying and hoping an apple is going to turn into an orange. And when it doesn't you get angry. TTG is an independent game studio that makes ADVENTURE games. With a fraction of the budget of the developers of most mainstream titles. Jesus Christ, your lack of appreciation is sickening!

    I agree... I spent a lot of time yesterday trying to get through to people.
    When it comes to picking and choosing my battles, I've just decided to let it go. lol

  • The problem is they didn't set up to many choices from the beginning. Other than Carley and Doug , You can't save anyone. Not Larry , Not Mark , Not Duck nor Katjaa , Lilly , Glenn will always leave and even the person you saved in the first episode bites the bullet. Still a great game nevertheless but the game was always an illusion of choice. I guess Carley/Doug's death is what's opening their eyes to it.

  • @ShadowFlux said: Honestly, to the people complaining. Your logic is invalid. You're askin for an Open-World RPG not a graphic adventure game, which TWD has always been advertised as. It's choice system is pretty advanced for that genre.


    I love arguing like this, people would like to change game "little" and you making from it Open-World RPG...

  • @Freeze said: The problem is they didn't set up to many choices from the beginning. Other than Carley and Doug , You can't save anyone. Not Larry , Not Mark , Not Duck nor Katjaa , Lilly , Glenn will always leave and even the person you saved in the first episode bites the bullet. Still a great game nevertheless but the game was always an illusion of choice. I guess Carley/Doug's death is what's opening their eyes to it.

    Yeah, but they mostly kicked own balls with advert choices matter, because from their point of view you can advert every game in this way...

  • @Funatick said: I love arguing like this, people would like to change game "little" and you making from it Open-World RPG...

    *scratches head* How did Loki's comment get quoted with my name there? haha

  • @deadfan said: I can expect an immature young gaming community to be persistent, inconsiderate, and downright rude when it comes to setting expectations on a game. You see, I remember the days when gaming companies didn't even have a direct line with their consumer base. From that perspective, my expectations on whether the game is on time or not is irrelevant---the proof is in the finished product, which I am interested in telling TellTale my feedback.

    As a fan of quick-time event games from the early laserdisk games (Dragon's Lair, etc) I was looking forward to being immersed in a world where ambiguous moral decisions in a world gone to hell would have to be executed on the fly without much time to discern the long term implications.

    What TellTale has done a remarkable job thus far is to immerse the player into a world and with outstanding scripts, voice acting and character development and direction have allowed me to LIVE in this world and care for the eventual outcome of the characters. It would not surprise me if the quality continues at the current pace that TellTale receives some type of industry recognition/award for this outstanding achievement.

    Where I think TellTale has some opportunities to improve are the branching of the story based on decisions. Early on, it was stressed by TellTale that "Decision Matters". It does, but only in a superficial way. For example, I described some of the early quick-time events such as Dragon's Lair. In that game, decision matters because making the wrong decision ends your life, and in general there was ONLY one correct answer. In Walking Dead, there are many different possible answers, but the opposite is in fact true. There is no wrong answer. The decisions implicates dialog routes along the game but ultimately doesn't change the outcome of the plot/story, which I think is a shame.

    For example, I recall wondering who would be the better ally when choosing Carly or Doug. Now, in Episode III, both are dead--SO IT DOESN'T MATTER. Remember wondering if Kenny wasn't going to take you to the coast based on how you treated his family. Well, he'll let you know that he wasn't happy with your decision, but IT DOESN'T MATTER--you all get to leave with him ANYWAY. There's many more but more of the standouts just to illustrate my point that CHOICE DOESN'T MATTER--at least not yet in this game. Yes we do get dialog SNIPPETS and slight variance of pathing but the plot continues to TellTale's design. I now act with more reckless abandon since it doesn't appear like it matters. I'm guessing TellTale will take certain relationships into account and present different "endings" and that will be it.

    The game is worth it's price of admission based on the story-telling alone but I'm hoping TellTale uses this feedback to improve a more vast and complex world/story based on YOUR choices--and to date that vision hasn't been realized.

    I understand it would take 3-4 times what it currently takes to complete an episode of branching was taken seriously. I work in IT so I understand the implications of my statements. But I would LOVE to see a game that TRULY rewards and/or punishes you for your choices, especially if the writing can remain top notch. I'm willing to pay more for the re-playability. First developer to take quality like this on a true multi-pathing route will be in the history books.

    What say you?

    I agree with what you're saying. I enjoy the story element and was just as shocked when Carley/Duck and Katjaa were knocked off. For that I can give Telltale praise, it's the choice element that irks me for reasons that you described. I would be willing to pay the price of a full game (ie ME3 or whatever) if they had branching choices that made a difference and lasted.

  • @ShadowFlux said: *scratches head* How did Loki's comment get quoted with my name there? haha

    sry man:D I was just lazy so copied:D

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