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Linux user and advenure game lover.

posted by Anonymous on - last edited - Viewed by 509 users

Hi there!

I am a Linux user from Sweden. I'm going to spare you the details of why I am not using Windows, but I let's just say that I got real tired of paying the Microsoft tax and that Linux fits my needs better. Everything would be really great in Linux-land except for one thing - games. Or rather, the lack of games. And that is why I am writing this post.

In my dreamworld all Telltale games will have native Linux ports. I really think there is a market for Linux games, and I think a lot of Linux users would love the kind of games I imagine Telltale will make - adventure games with lots of humor. Adventure games should be relatively easy to port, if I recall correct Escape from Monkey Island could render with OpenGL. Using OpenGL and not DirectX means having half the Linux port done. And having a native Linux port means that you almost have a Mac OS X port.

Ok, maybe I'm dreaming. But at very least, you could make sure that your games run on Linux with Transgaming's Cedega. I would really love to test the Hold Em-demo, but it is distributed in a .msi-file and I can't get it installing. (Maybe there is a way, but I want to be able to use point2play.)

To sum up. Native Linux ports and I will be Telltale's number one fan-boy and buy all of Telltale's games.. If the game is a new Sam n Max or Monkey Island it is quite possible that I will buy it if it runs with Cedega. But c'mon - id could make Doom 3 run nativly under Linux, I'm sure Telltale will bring the love back to adventure gaming and make Linux and Mac ports...

24 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • oh it wasn't a flame of mine either. I'm just giving my view of things thats all. Beta was better but in the end it died. I'm all for ports to other os's but there really isn't a market for it to make it worth while.

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    Anonymous

    This
    might be pertinent (scroll down a bit past the browser stuff). Yes, Windows is going strong, but Linux and Mac have been showing slow and steady growth over the last couple of years. I'm not really going anywhere with this because my Linux experience is about 35 minutes, I'm just pointing out some interesting data.

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    Anonymous

    [quote]oh it wasn't a flame of mine either. I'm just giving my view of things thats all. Beta was better but in the end it died. I'm all for ports to other os's but there really isn't a market for it to make it worth while.[/quote]In truth, though, a standardized code base (like Java or C) with open-standard libraries (specifically OpenGL) would make cross-platform applications (including games) much, much easier to create than those that are coded with Microsoft-proprietary tools like DirectX. Game and application developers are only hurting themselves by voluntarily coding with closed-standard tools as they are limiting their market. And as was mentioned before, the Linux market *is* expanding as people become more and more frustrated with Microsoft's lack of security and bug-ridden software.

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    Anonymous

    [quote]If TTG has a great game engine or other intellectual property that could be of great value to them in the future, should we expect them to give it away? I wouldn't.[/quote]
    I'm not saying they should give it away. There is nothing to stop an open-source project from also being sold commercially. Open-source doesn't inherently mean it's free, it only means the source for the executable is available for peer review and improvement. Traditionally, any changes goes back into the main source tree, thereby giving back to the original developer. This can be a great advantage in availability for a multitude of platforms. Additionally, the developer doesn't need to provide the data files for free. There are many games that employ this strategy, like the Quake series, Freespace and others, where you can download the source, improve it, but you have to buy the actual data files in order to actually play the game.
    If something like this could be worked out with Telltale - possibly after the game has been available for Windows for some time - it would be awesome. But of course, much relies on them actually choosing OpenGL as their API of choice. But as I said, considering that they already have experience with both OpenGL and DirectX, I hope they will choose the open standard or make an engine that can handle both (like the EFMI engine).

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    Anonymous

    [quote]In truth, though, a standardized code base (like Java or C) with open-standard libraries (specifically OpenGL) would make cross-platform applications (including games) much, much easier to create than those that are coded with Microsoft-proprietary tools like DirectX. Game and application developers are only hurting themselves by voluntarily coding with closed-standard tools as they are limiting their market. And as was mentioned before, the Linux market *is* expanding as people become more and more frustrated with Microsoft's lack of security and bug-ridden software.[/quote]


    I thought Java was proprietary, and that this was the reason that it wasn't included in debian?

    On the other hand, OpenGL is as proprietary as DirectX. There is nowhere you can download the OpenGL source code... the only difference with DirectX, is that OpenGL is available on many different platforms, that's all!

    If you want to make an implementation of OpenGL on a new platform, you need a licence from SGI (Silicon Graphics). You can see it if you look on the intro page of Mesa (an opengl-compatible API).

    As for asking a development team to release the source code of their game at the time of the game's release to ease the development of a Linux or Mac port, I think this is really suicidal, especially if you're asking it to a small development studio that has to sell its products in order to make money...

    Porting the game to other platforms can be tedious, even if the game was built with portability in mind... just think of Neverwinter Nights... the Linux client came out some 6 (or more) months after the game was out... I still remember the flame wars of Linux users... it was awful for Bioware, but still they carried on! I'm a debian user, but have also a valid Windows licence because I'm a hardcore gamer, and most of my games don't work on Linux at all!

    I don't know how this will work with the online distribution of Bone, but imagine Telltale distributing their game, and protecting it in some way to prevent/limit piracy. On windows-based systems, you usually do that with ensuring the CD is in the drive for CD based games, or using an authentication method with a server (like steam, or the NWN premium modules: the server gives a key to decrypt the game data, allowing you to play the game). The CD based method could be difficult to implement in Linux because of the way drives are mounted... Authentication with a central server works, because of NWN premium modules working with Linux.

    Ok, but now, the source code for the game engine is given out for free... this means that anyone could build an engine, working on any platform, and not needing any form of authentication! Just think of the engines build by gamers based on the doom/quake source code. They just need the game data files (not the CD), to run the game, and these data files can be obtained easily on abandonware sites, and/or P2P networks. (I'm not encouraging this, it's just a factual statement). So, if anyone could create an engine that bypasses the protection, and if the only requirement would be data files (that can be obtained through a lot of different ways), it doesn't look easy for Telltale to make sure the sales go well!

    Even iD Software release the source code of their games a few years after the game comes out... Quake III was released in 1999, the source code just a month ago!

    The only personal drawback I find with server authentication, is that if a company like Valve goes bust and all the steam servers are shut down, how can you ensure you're still able to play the game you bought? Ok, maybe Valve is a bad example, because of the boosted sales of their games, but still... It's very difficult to imagine an interpreter like ScummVM or an emulator like dosbox coming out in 10 years, allowing me to show this or that game to my kids!

    Anyway, I can't wait to play the Bone game! Even if it doesn't run on Linux on day one, I'll still buy it to play it on my Windows partition!


    *wow* what started to be a quick reply to a post, rapidly became a very long post... thanks for reading all of it!

  • [quote]The only personal drawback I find with server authentication, is that if a company like Valve goes bust and all the steam servers are shut down, how can you ensure you're still able to play the game you bought? [/quote]

    I remember this issue was raised by someone earlier concerning texas hold'em, and it was said that if that ever happened, they would probably release patches that removed the online authentication thingie.

  • For those who don't know. DOS emulation on Linux works real well. I can get all those old DOS games to play! Doom, Duke Nukem, Leasure suite Lary, Lucas Arts games and Karandia, Red Neck Rampage in high visa mode to name just a few :)

  • Hey talk to those guys at ID Software. I don't see them going broke. They open source most their code.

  • @ClementXVII said: I thought Java was proprietary, and that this was the reason that it wasn't included in debian?



    It is for the moment... However, SUN are going to make Java open source from the 1.6 release onward (due for release before the end of the year) - Or something like that


    But.... Why don't Linux users just use Wine?

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