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Help me to learn English Like a native

posted by N7. on - last edited - Viewed by 3.1K users

Hi, I would like to learn English but in our country and in our schools they really don't teach us English! just a little about grammatical rules :( I learned a little by myself ! but still I have some problems

I just need you guys come here some times and help me to find out some of my questions about this language

thanks

186 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • You can learn English online, I think http://www.idiomaswatson.com/ this will help you to learn English.

  • You can play Hidden-Object games,to learn lots of nouns

  • @Andorxor said: You can play Hidden-Object games,to learn lots of nouns

    And they'll make you want to learn lots of profanities.

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    N7.

    When should we use of this sentence ? "We have been down this road before"
    I know what is mean of this sentence, I just would to know when should we use such a sentence like this ?

  • It means someone is suggesting to do something that has already been tried, and has not been successful in the past. It could be in business or in a relationship. (Sometimes sports announcers use it, too.)

    A business example: In the past year, two social media companies, Zynga and Facebook, have "gone public" (meaning they issued stock for public trading for the first time). In both cases, the value of the stock has gone way down since it was issued. Say some third social media company has an idea to go public now. We've been down that road before.

    Relationship example: A man and a woman have two children, but the man and the woman fight a lot. The woman wants to stop fighting and suggests to the man that having another child might bring them closer together. The man could say, "We've been down that road before," meaning it didn't work the last two times. Everyone else would just scream "NO!" at them.

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    N7.

    @WarpSpeed said: It means someone is suggesting to do something that has already been tried, and has not been successful in the past. It could be in business or in a relationship. (Sometimes sports announcers use it, too.)

    A business example: In the past year, two social media companies, Zynga and Facebook, have "gone public" (meaning they issued stock for public trading for the first time). In both cases, the value of the stock has gone way down since it was issued. Say some third social media company has an idea to go public now. We've been down that road before.

    Relationship example: A man and a woman have two children, but the man and the woman fight a lot. The woman wants to stop fighting and suggests to the man that having another child might bring them closer together. The man could say, "We've been down that road before," meaning it didn't work the last two times. Everyone else would just scream "NO!" at them.


    Thanks a lot, it was a complete description
    I have two more questions :D

    first:
    What is mean of sidelines ? for example she's staying on the sidelines

    second:
    When should we use "pieced together" ?
    for example "Have you pieced together how should we do that ?"
    I mean when people use this:confused:
    is it general ?

  • Sidelines comes from sports. Some sports are played on a field, where the lines at the top and bottom are goal lines, and the lines on the side are sidelines. They are called different things in different sports, but you get the idea. The people playing the game are in the field. Someone standing on the sidelines is watching the game but not playing it. That can be made more general, so for example, someone who is reading this message but never posts on this forum could be said to be reading from the sidelines.

    Pieced together is like a puzzle, where you have to put pieces together to finish the puzzle. It just means you need to work to figure out the solution.

  • @N7. said: Thanks a lot, it was a complete description
    I have two more questions :D

    first:
    What is mean of sidelines ? for example she's staying on the sidelines

    It's a reference to sporting events.

    Many sports use a field, and the edges of the field are usually marked by lines. The sidelines refer to the lines which run from one goal to the other; while goal lines are the lines on either edge of the field which is nearest to either goal. "Staying (or sitting) on the sidelines" refers to watching the game without actually being a part of playing it.

    4fU4t.png

    This, in common (non-sports-related) usage, means to deliberately not get involved in a situation more than to just watch what is happening.

    second:
    When should we use "pieced together" ?
    for example "Have you pieced together how should we do that ?"

    When you think "pieced together", think of something you have to fix, like a jigsaw puzzle:
    ehMHK.png
    So, "piecing (something) together" basically means solving a problem by looking at the different things involved in the problem and figuring out how they fit together.

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    N7.

    I really appreciate both of you, I think I'll never forget mean of this word "Sidelines"
    thanks

    I'll come back with more questions :o

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    N7.

    Hi again, I have some more questions

    1: What is mean of "surged" ?
    for example "they surged through the relays and hit Arcturus station"
    this sentence is from Mass Effect3

    2: What is mean of "I'm flattered" ?

    3: In this sentence what's mean of "principle"?(it's the larger principle that matters
    )

    4: what's mean of "I'll hammer them " ?
    for example "I'll hammer them with every soldier, ship, and bullet we've got"
    it's from ME3 too

    5: What does mean bold section in the bottom sentence ?
    How long can we keep that up ?

    6: What does mean blod section in the bottom sentence ?
    I'm buying us time, keeping us in the game while you gather what we need for this Prothean device
    this sentence is from ME3 too

    7: and finally what is mean of "So keep at it" ?

    thanks a lot

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