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Help me to learn English Like a native

posted by N7. on - last edited - Viewed by 2.9K users

Hi, I would like to learn English but in our country and in our schools they really don't teach us English! just a little about grammatical rules :( I learned a little by myself ! but still I have some problems

I just need you guys come here some times and help me to find out some of my questions about this language

thanks

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    N7.

    Thanks a lot
    but how much of these words we have in English ?
    I mean with the same meaning but different Spelling in place of verb,noun and adjective

  • @N7. said: Thanks a lot
    but how much of these words we have in English ?
    I mean with the same meaning but different Spelling in place of verb,noun and adjective

    There are many of them. Sadly, a lot of them just require repetition to learn since there aren't definite rules to how they work. It's daunting, I know, but if you spend time with movies, TV shows, and books, it should start sounding natural after awhile. If you go the book route, you can look up any word you aren't familiar with and maybe write down the word and the part of speech it belongs to in a notebook or something for reference.

  • Quite a lot. In fact, the joke is that in English, any noun can be verbed. Some people abhor that, though, so try to use proper nouns/verbs/adjectives when you know them.

    By the way, "abhor" is a strong word, so it is not used very often. People are more likely to use the word "hate" instead. Hate is normally a verb but is sometimes used as a noun, too ("His eyes were full of hate when he saw the potato."), though the correct noun for it is hatred.

  • From what I've been told, the best way to learn the language is to read books. Sometimes, even if you don't know the exact definition of a word, you can often discern (or recognize) what a general idea of the definition might be from the context of the word (or the sentence/paragraph around the word).

    So, if you didn't know what "abhor" meant, but you saw or read about someone giving a potato to Alcoremortis, and she got angry or disgusted and said "Eww! I abhor potatoes!" You would be able to discern from the context that "abhor" indicates a negative opinion of some kind even if you're a bit fuzzy on the details.

    So I would recommend reading a lot. It will help you.

    [EDIT:] Oh, and when I recommended reading books, rather than just reading in general, it's because if you try to learn proper English from reading forum conversations, facebook posts or twitter feeds on the net, then you'd probably get a number of things wrong because there are a lot of people on the net who couldn't spell, punctuate or have proper grammar skills even if their lives depended on it. So long as your primary teaching tool isn't from people who are themselves ignorant, you should be okay.

  • sorry for the double post.

    @Iryon said: Note on grammar:
    [QUOTE=N7.;685631]What is mean of


    is incorrect.

    More correct would be "What does ... mean" or "What is the meaning of ..."

    The word 'mean' can be a verb (to mean), a noun (the mean) or an adjective (mean) which are used very differently and have largely varying meanings.

    The word 'meaning' is the correct noun to the verb 'to mean' when referring to what a word means.

    (Could any of you native speakers please be so kind and make this a bit more understandable? Because reading my post I just realised that I don't understand what I mean here ...)[/QUOTE]Mean does have several different definitions, depending on the context.

    The word "mean" can refer to the "definition" of something; it can also refer to someone who makes other people feel bad; and again it can refer to a middle number value (count to five: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. The middle number is 3 and is therefore the mean number.) Someone might now argue with me about the difference between the word "mean" and the word "median," but in this case, you get the idea.


    In the context of this conversation, the word "mean" refers to the "definition."
    You could say "what does 'surged' mean?", "what is the meaning of the word 'surged?'", "what is the definition of the word 'surged?'", or "how do you define 'surged?'"

    There's that noun-becomes-a-verb situation again. When you're looking at a word, it may containt a prefix and/or a suffix in addition to the root word. The root word of "definition" is the word "define." the -tion part of the word is called a suffix and changes how the root word is used.

    Try "abhor." "Abhorrent" and "Abhorrence" both have the same root word "abhor," but use different suffixes (-ent and -ence) which change the way the root word is used. The meaning of the root word is the same, but the way it is used in a sentence is slightly different.

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    N7.

    Thanks again, Now I'm using a dictionary that called WordPower, it's a cool dictionary. very useful
    I've start to learn worlds that starts with the letters of A
    then B,C,D and...
    I should learn atleast 20000 new worlds
    I'll back with more questions
    thanks

  • @N7. said: Thanks again, Now I'm using a dictionary that called WordPower, it's a cool dictionary. very useful
    I've start to learn worlds that starts with the letters of A
    then B,C,D and...
    I should learn atleast 20000 new worlds
    I'll back with more questions
    thanks

    Some people think it's not polite to nitpick at someone's grammar and spelling, but in this case, since the whole point of this thread is that you're actually trying to learn (which is cool, by the way), please don't take offense if I fix your posts sometimes.

    @N7. said: Thanks again, Now I'm using a dictionary that's called WordPower, it's a cool dictionary. Very useful. (this is not a complete sentence, but this is only a conversation on a forum, so it will suffice.)
    I've started to learn worlds that start with the letters of A then B, C, D and...
    I should learn at least 20000 new words.
    I'll back with more questions.
    Thanks.

    Again, this was overly nitpicky. I was just wanting to point out that the root word "start" required the suffix "-ed" for the manner you used it in.

    "Start" is present tense, meaning something that that happens now (I start to learn words).
    "Started" is past tense, meaning that it has already happened. (I've started to learn words).
    The "-ed" suffix makes it past tense.

    http://www.helpingwithverbs.com/lessons/VerbTense.htm

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    N7.

    Thanks Chyron8472, why should some people think it's not polite ? I've asked help and you helped me to find out my wrongs. thanks

    I want to continue this thread after a long time

    My first question is when should we use of "holdup" ?
    for example I heard that Shepard told to Wrex "What's the holdup?" and he answered "Road's out"

  • The phrase "What's the hold up?" is another way of saying "What's taking so long?" or "Why aren't we moving?".

    If something is holding you up, it is preventing you from doing things, making you put what you were doing on 'hold'.

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    N7.

    Thanks it's clear enogh now
    What does "we have to abort" mean ? a pilot said that

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