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On the lifespan of TWD's characters.

posted by Xebioz on - last edited - Viewed by 819 users

This contains ep. 4 spoilers.

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Am I the only one concerned that changing out so much of the cast kind of diminishes the emotional impact of losing those characters? I mean losing Chuck, as bad as it was, really couldn't compare to the scene where we lost Lilly or the death of Doug/Carley. To me, the fact that the lifespan of the characters keep getting shortened really hurts this aspect of TWD.

It also seems like the story is moving too fast. Look at for example the series. For half of the second season it's pretty much one TT episode, if even that. The fact that the story moves along so fast, killing off everyone and then instantly replacing them makes me at this point less interested in learning about new cast members.

That's my take, what's yours?

23 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • This did cross my mind when the group were assembled in the house after Lee and Kenny returned. There was a point where there was an almost photo-frame shot of all of them stood together and I thought about how the group had changed so dramatically since ep.2.

  • @dubesor said: Omid is fine either way. Nothing happens to him if you take Clem with you.

    Oh. Well shucks, I wanted him to be able to bite it if Clem weren't there to save him. Still, thats 4 deaths down to 2 depending on what your mood.

  • @Rock114 said: I liked Chuck too, and was a bit sad that he died. We didn't get nearly as much time with him to build up a connection as others though.

    And this was, actually an episode with very FEW deaths. Brie and Chuck are unavoidable, while Molly's, Ben's and (possibly Omid, if you take Clem with you) are all completely optional. That goes from 4 (maybe 5) characters dying to just 2 depending on what you choose to do.

    Omid doesn't die if you take Clem with you, in case you're wondering about that.

    EDIT: I'm slow.

  • @joorgen said: Lol, this was all I could think about when Vernon (that was the right name right?) talked about the death of that one chick and mentions that he doesn't feel anything he should feel something but just doesn't.

    lol I know. When he said that I kind of smiled since I could totally relate. What happened was sad but I didn't really feel anything since they were strangers compared to the drugstore group.

    Chuck seemed pretty interesting so I was disappointed when he died. So much potential for development

    The only thing that affected me was Clem crying and what happened to Lee.

  • Yes, the short lifespan reduces the emotional impact. Chuck was a great guy, but I barely noticed him. Yep, he was going to hold them off on his own and be fine ... right. When I found him in the tunnels, I was just glad he got to shoot himself. Otherwise, not surprised or impacted.

    This was a low forced death count episode, though, so it let people build up a little bit of caring.

    I also agree it's a lot easier to make these episodes when optional characters die off instead of allowing the combinations and possibilities to grow.

    With that in mind, that means there are no rules for episode 5. It doesn't have to tie in to a next episode. It can be a bloodbath or let everyone live, based on what the writers want to do, not based on how hard it is to keep all those options going.

  • Like I think I've stated before, I did feel sad to see chuck die, but not as much because I don't feel like I got very much time to bond with the guy. You have at maximum had like what? 3-4 conversations with the guy? And that's if you talk to him every possible chance you get.

    I just think it would be nice to have an episode focusing more on the internal struggle within the group rather than struggle in the group appearing because the plot throws you all over the place.

  • I was actually pretty sad that Chuck died. His last act was to bravely hold off the walkers so we could get away. The fact that I didn't know him that well definitely had an impact on me because now I wish I could have learned more about him.

    At least, he didn't reanimate.

  • @Xebioz said:
    Am I the only one concerned that changing out so much of the cast kind of diminishes the emotional impact of losing those characters? I mean losing Chuck, as bad as it was, really couldn't compare to the scene where we lost Lilly or the death of Doug/Carley. To me, the fact that the lifespan of the characters keep getting shortened really hurts this aspect of TWD.

    I agree and I think I said this before: Killing off characters, then re-stocking the group, then starting all over again might be great for shock value, but no effect wears off as fast. I'd rather have some more character development.

  • I agree kind of. The first few deaths I was very shocked. But as time went by and people died left and right I started not to care anymore. Don't know if that's what they intended...

  • I feel like vernon at the end of the episode almost lol. But I definately think that it would be much better to have more character development and less random puzzles that usually don't really make any sense.

    --A few TV series spoilers below here--

    Also, like I said before, when it comes to killing people off, look at what they did with sophia in the series. A lot of development and a really good finish. I was really shocked at that point (partly because she wasn't dead in the comic and partly because they had spent so much time looking for her). Like I said, that is proper character development and because of that you're much more invested in what's happening.

    But that said, it's not that I'm not invested in the story of the game, because it is really good, I just think it could be even better if the plot wasn't railroading the story every time there is a bit of character development happening.

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