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BIG election day coming, who is the next president! (in the USA)

posted by TheNNerdGamer on - last edited - Viewed by 1.1K users

Mitt Romney or Barack Obama
(please mods close poll, I accidentally put it to 30 days poll closing, so after election mods please close this)
I got bored so I made this.
Edit: if neither win I hope J.K Simmons (LOLZ)

142 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @coolsome said: I hope Mitt comes out drunk and screaming I WANT TO BE PRESIDENT!!! IWANTITIWANTIT!!!!!!!onion_gifs_emoticons-10.gif

    That sounds like the people on my facebook wall!

  • Maybe Obama will read the speech for losing.

  • Obama just made me cry a little.

  • Assuming Obama is a member of these forums and will actually read this, he has my congratulations. It's just a shame that he couldn't gain control of the house of representatives again (Which I'm assuming is just Ike the house of commons over here. Although, I'm still not sure how you can get most of the votes and have a minority). It means it will be harder than ever to push bills through when the US needs decisive action. The republicans are more than likely going to be sour for a few months and be more resistive.

  • @Jennifer said: "Two party politics" is usually the case for presidential elections in the United States (I say usually as it is possible for one of the two major parties to lose power to a third party - look at what happened to the Whigs).

    Congressional elections are a different matter. There are always third party candidates who win seats in the Senate and/or the House of Representatives (this year being no different - Vermont and Maine at least elected third party Senators, and there's likely to be more as the results aren't in yet for many states).

    There are true independent voters out there. I'm personally registered as no party affiliation. I voted for the Republican candidate for president in 2000 and for the Democratic candidate for president in 2008 and 2012 (I didn't vote in 2004 because I was caring full time for my sick grandparents at the time). In all three elections, I voted for both Democrats and Republicans for Senate and the House of Representatives. I base my votes on how the candidate's views align with mine, not on party affiliations (there are many conservative Democrats and liberal Republicans. It's not really so cut and dry as it seems sometimes).

    Your congressman or senator's going to be able to do a lot more for you locally than Mr. President, I totally get that. I'm a big-picture kind of guy however and I don't really trust politicians to do anything but to tow the party line when their back's against the wall, that's why they invented party whips I guess, to discourage independent thought on an institutionalised level.

    With the way modern politics is run you need a hell of a lot of money and backers to stand any real chance of doing anything significant. There'll always be a few outlying states/constituencies that'll elect third-party or independent representatives and that's brilliant, but it's really the exception to the rule. Independents can never hope to have campaign trails, media coverage or hands on deck that the Dems and the GOP have or Labour and Tory or Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael, untill reforms are made to the wild west attitude most nations have to party funding we'll never see the rise of the independent representative on a large-scale.

    @Jennifer said: I'm still not sure how you can get most of the votes and have a minority). It means it will be harder than ever to push bills through when the US needs decisive action. The republicans are more than likely going to be sour for a few months and be more resistive.

    First-past-the-post baby. The thing is that its best feature IMO is that it creates strong governments, there's no point in the people electing someone to do a job only to have the losers stopping them from getting any work done. Yet in the US this is not the case because of checks and balances. In the UK this was traditionally was the case but now we have this coalition government. hardly matters anyway, the Lib Dems sold out at the first whiff of power, the Lords filibustering bad policy is our only protection from the Torys at this point.

  • When people say "I'm not voting since my vote obviously doesn't count", they obviously don't think about the fact that we're not just voting on politicians at the federal level. We're also voting for local politicians, for amendments to our states' constitutions, and for projects/taxes which directly affect our county or city.

    It's more than just voting for the President and the federal Congress.

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    This is not counting Florida for some reason. Florida has 29 electoral votes and is leading for Obama by 46,000 votes, so add that to Obama's total number.

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    Jennifer Moderator

    @Friar said: Assuming Obama is a member of these forums and will actually read this, he has my congratulations.


    Now I can't get Obama's voice out of my head saying "I really enjoy those humorous Dog and Rabbit video games you can purchase on the internet." :D

    @Friar said: When people to say "I'm not voting since my vote obviously doesn't count", they obviously don't think about the fact that we're not just voting on politicians at the federal level. We're also voting for local politicians, for amendments to our states' constitutions, and for projects/taxes which directly affect our county or city.

    It's more than just voting for the President and the federal Congress.


    The only local proposition on our ballot was one to grant our district money for library funding, and that was hidden on the back of the ballot... can't say I really liked that. They told my mom about it when she asked how the ballot worked, but when I told her about it she said she didn't understand what they meant and wished she had voted for it. I'm sure she's not the only one who didn't even know that proposition was there.

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