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Preserve the adventure genre

posted by Chris23 on - last edited - Viewed by 416 users

I want with this topic say to Telltale Games
that I am glad that your company have chosen to maintain
the adventure genre and put an end to LucasArts and other
publishers negative towards the adventure genre with the words:

"The Adventure Genre Is Dead"

Which is not true at all...:mad:

Telltale Games,Revolution Software, Pendulo Studios and others show
the publishers that adventures is still appreciated today.

So don't just focus on FPS and other genres even if they are good also
but think about the small group who love and miss the 80's, dear publishers.

:)

27 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Juhsayngul said: No, it wasn't. It was an RPG or Action Adventure (which is a separate thing) like all other Zeldas.

    Aww......No dressing up as ERROR then...

  • hehe never thought anyone here at Telltale Games forum would comment to my preserve the adventure genre. Now I am so glad that more fans take a stand for the ADVENTURE. :D :o

  • I think the problem is that adventure game design thought still exists, but it goes one of two, not terribly productive ways.

    The first is to relive the glory days, like a lot of modern day, mediocre adventure games do. They rehash the formula without really doing anything about design problem areas.

    The other is go all Dreamfall, and integrate elements of other genres into it. Sometimes these experiments are interesting, but rarely do these attempts actually progress adventure game design.

    Telltale is doing pretty good. What they're doing is creating adventure games in a traditional style, but you can see they're thinking about the sorts of problems that adventure games have. I'd still like to see someone take a truly revolutionary step with the genre, but their evolutionary approach is progressive in its own right.

    Of course me personally, I'm working on an adventure game project that definitely falls much further in the "evolutionary" than "revolutionary" category. But hey, I'm just getting started; no sense shooting for the stars when you're still learning to hit a target five feet in front of you. ;)

  • @Harley Quinn said: I've suddenly got an image of a load of people dressed up as Max and tenticles with big signs, trooping around in protest.

    It must be Thursday.

    You stole my Hallowe'en costume idea!
    I was going to make a really cool tentacle costume. Oh well.:D

  • The adventure game genre is pretty much dead. There are some exceptions, like Telltale, but in general, adventure games aren't being made anymore. Sam & Max somehow made it and recieved a fair amount of attention. This was not the case with Bone.

    The only thing that keeps people interested in adventure games are projects like ScummVM and ocassional new releases like Sam & Max. Japanese never really embraced the point and click style, but if they did, things might have been different - with them being responsible for the console revolution and all.

    I remember the times when adventure games were published on monthly basis. Some better, some worse, but the genre was thriving. I did buy them and play them, I continued to support the genre for many years but the gaming industry had changed. Just like in the times of adventure games there was no place for 3D fighting, realistic car driving games and mindblowing first person shooters, now there's very little space for adventure games. I guess people choose to beat up each other in Tekken or interact with each other in World of Warcraft rather than be figuring out how to make a rope with a hook out of a jar of mustard, old shoe and a pink ribbon.

    I love adventure games and I would like to see more of them but I guess the times changed and there's no market for them. I remember playing "Prisoner of Ice" or "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream". It was exciting, challenging, entertaining ... I loved every second of it. Even when I got stuck, I knew there is a way to figure it all out. Now the closest you can get to this kind of action is Biohazard / Resident Evil type games, which are becoming more and more action oriented.

    I guess all we have left are those few titles like Sam & Max and abitious projects like AGS and the great titles that came with it [Apprentice, Nelly Cootalot].

  • @Morden said: The adventure game genre is pretty much dead. There are some exceptions, like Telltale, but in general, adventure games aren't being made anymore. Sam & Max somehow made it and recieved a fair amount of attention. This was not the case with Bone.

    The only thing that keeps people interested in adventure games are projects like ScummVM and ocassional new releases like Sam & Max. Japanese never really embraced the point and click style, but if they did, things might have been different - with them being responsible for the console revolution and all.

    I remember the times when adventure games were published on monthly basis. Some better, some worse, but the genre was thriving. I did buy them and play them, I continued to support the genre for many years but the gaming industry had changed. Just like in the times of adventure games there was no place for 3D fighting, realistic car driving games and mindblowing first person shooters, now there's very little space for adventure games. I guess people choose to beat up each other in Tekken or interact with each other in World of Warcraft rather than be figuring out how to make a rope with a hook out of a jar of mustard, old shoe and a pink ribbon.

    I love adventure games and I would like to see more of them but I guess the times changed and there's no market for them. I remember playing "Prisoner of Ice" or "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream". It was exciting, challenging, entertaining ... I loved every second of it. Even when I got stuck, I knew there is a way to figure it all out. Now the closest you can get to this kind of action is Biohazard / Resident Evil type games, which are becoming more and more action oriented.

    I guess all we have left are those few titles like Sam & Max and abitious projects like AGS and the great titles that came with it [Apprentice, Nelly Cootalot].

    Whats wrong with keyboard keys and click.

  • @Morden said: The adventure game genre is pretty much dead. There are some exceptions, like Telltale, but in general, adventure games aren't being made anymore. Sam & Max somehow made it and recieved a fair amount of attention. This was not the case with Bone.

    The only thing that keeps people interested in adventure games are projects like ScummVM and ocassional new releases like Sam & Max. Japanese never really embraced the point and click style, but if they did, things might have been different - with them being responsible for the console revolution and all.

    I remember the times when adventure games were published on monthly basis. Some better, some worse, but the genre was thriving. I did buy them and play them, I continued to support the genre for many years but the gaming industry had changed. Just like in the times of adventure games there was no place for 3D fighting, realistic car driving games and mindblowing first person shooters, now there's very little space for adventure games. I guess people choose to beat up each other in Tekken or interact with each other in World of Warcraft rather than be figuring out how to make a rope with a hook out of a jar of mustard, old shoe and a pink ribbon.

    I love adventure games and I would like to see more of them but I guess the times changed and there's no market for them. I remember playing "Prisoner of Ice" or "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream". It was exciting, challenging, entertaining ... I loved every second of it. Even when I got stuck, I knew there is a way to figure it all out. Now the closest you can get to this kind of action is Biohazard / Resident Evil type games, which are becoming more and more action oriented.

    I guess all we have left are those few titles like Sam & Max and abitious projects like AGS and the great titles that came with it [Apprentice, Nelly Cootalot].

    That whole post is full of wrong. For one thing, to this day, the Japanese game developers are rediscovering point and click Adventure games on Nintendo's DS and Wii systems, such as with the Gyakuten Saiban (Phoenix Wright) series and the new Zack & Wiki game that came out.

    Also, just because P&C Adventure games aren't a dominant genre anymore doesn't mean that they're dead. Otherwise, you wouldn't be at this forum, now would you? ;)

  • @Iron Curtain said: That whole post is full of wrong. For one thing, to this day, the Japanese game developers are rediscovering point and click Adventure games on Nintendo's DS and Wii systems, such as with the Gyakuten Saiban (Phoenix Wright) series and the new Zack & Wiki game that came out.

    Also, just because P&C Adventure games aren't a dominant genre anymore doesn't mean that they're dead. Otherwise, you wouldn't be at this forum, now would you? ;)

    i completely agree with this. hardly any platform games are being released, but they aren't dead are they, same with strategy games, and flight sims (arcade or otherwise).

  • @Iron Curtain said: That whole post is full of wrong. For one thing, to this day, the Japanese game developers are rediscovering point and click Adventure games on Nintendo's DS and Wii systems, such as with the Gyakuten Saiban (Phoenix Wright) series and the new Zack & Wiki game that came out.

    Actually, the japanese have have a pretty big adventure game industry that has been very much alive all these years. Most of these games were never translated though.

  • @Iron Curtain said: That whole post is full of wrong. (...) Japanese game developers are rediscovering point and click Adventure games on Nintendo's DS and Wii systems, (...) Gyakuten Saiban (Phoenix Wright), Zack & Wiki game that came out.

    So that's what? Two titles? Yea, the Japanese really did a great job of reinventing the genre. Besides, just because you point and click does not mean it's a point and click adventure. "Look! I'm pointing at the TV with my wiimote and I'm clicking the buttons ... It's a point and click game, for sure".

    Also, just because P&C Adventure games aren't a dominant genre anymore doesn't mean that they're dead. Otherwise, you wouldn't be at this forum, now would you? ;)

    Well, I am here and I buy Telltale games, but that doesn't really change much. There's very little going on in the world of point and click adventure games. They simply became as popular as, let's say, flight sims. And no, Ace Combat is not a flight sim.

    I somehow knew that the minute I say that Japan is not spitting out point and click adventure games, someone will shout "Zack & Wiki". I own the game, but I would say it's more of a puzzle than your regular adventure.

    What I meant was, if japanese developers would embrace the genre as we know it [the point and click model found in LucasArts, Sierra, Revolution and Adventure Soft games], we would probably be seeing such games even today. The standard adventure game market in Japan is non existant [post FM Towns] but they still make tons of eroge dating games which are basically a bunch of stills, load of text and multiple choice answer type gameplay.

    Ask a japanese gamer about LucasArts PNCs and they stare at you blankly. Ask them about latest visual novels and they will get all excited.

    Anyways, I sure can play my Phantom Hourglass on the DS by pointing and clicking with the stylus, but I don't see it as "point and click reinvented". How many titles current or upcoming titles can you name that use the good old point and click interface as seen in first three Monkey Island games, first two Broken Sword games or the old Sam & Max? Not counting the AGS titles of course.

    I'm not trying to get into an argument and read things like "You're wrong! There's Nintendogs! You can point and click at them! There's Zack & Wiki too" because I'm aware of all those titles. What I meant was, there are very few developers willing to make the old style adventure games and Japan basically ignored this model of gameplay, which is a shame because they are the big influence in the gaming industry.

    @Iron Curtain said: Actually, the japanese have have a pretty big adventure game industry that has been very much alive all these years. Most of these games were never translated though.

    I'm willing to learn about new games, so please name a few. I have nothing against playing in japanese. I would like to underline one thing though, I did mean the classic model point and click. There are plenty of games that fall into the adventure category, but there's very little pointing and clicking. LucasArts' Grim Fandango isn't that far away from the first couple Resident Evil games when you think about it, but that's hardly what I would call a classic model adventure game. In both cases.

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