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Has TellTale single handidly revolutionized video game narrative's as we know it?

posted by DatDude on - last edited - Viewed by 268 users

I think yes.

This might just be our "citizen kane" in terms of video game importance and a template of how to create video game narrative and story development.

Hell, I wouldn't even be surprised if the walking dead becomes the focus towards college lectures as well.

bravo tell tale!

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  • @DatDude said: I think yes.

    This might just be our "citizen kane" in terms of video game importance and a template of how to create video game narrative and story development.

    Hell, I wouldn't even be surprised if the walking dead becomes the focus towards college lectures as well.

    bravo tell tale!



    Hell no.

    The railroading dead could as well have been a movie, or a comic or simply leave out the entire fighting, buttonmashing and illusionary choices out and just make it the giant cutscene that this game actually is.

    Why bother making a video game where your choices don't matter at all? Like totally not at all?

  • @Shadowhunter said: Definitely, best heavy story based game I've ever played or heard of.



    Try Heavy Rain. Beware: Your choices there do actually matter and....surprise: There are many different endings, depending on your choices. How did they do it? There's not just one hipster "main character must die" ending, there are many different endings and everyone can be happy. Crazy, right?

    Mass Effect 1 and 2 have a great story as well.

    TWD is nothing special. The story is great, but they used the wrong media for it, I mean if I wanted to watch one giant cutscene and have absolutely 0 impact on the story whatsoever, I'd read a book or watch a movie instead of playing a video game that's supposed to be interactive.

  • @shedim said: Try Heavy Rain. Beware: Your choices there do actually matter and....surprise: There are many different endings, depending on your choices. How did they do it? There's not just one hipster "main character must die" ending, there are many different endings and everyone can be happy. Crazy, right?

    Mass Effect 1 and 2 have a great story as well.

    TWD is nothing special. The story is great, but they used the wrong media for it, I mean if I wanted to watch one giant cutscene and have absolutely 0 impact on the story whatsoever, I'd read a book or watch a movie instead of playing a video game that's supposed to be interactive.



    What do you mean, wrong media? The story is based on the comic books. There is already a tv show. They are a game company. What media do you think they should have chosen. Board game?

    You're comparing two different levels here, in my opinion. Yes, Mass Effect, yes, Heavy Rain - outstanding games, but those games depleted much more money, time and resources. Or am I wrong?

  • @barenaked said: What do you mean, wrong media? The story is based on the comic books. There is already a tv show. They are a game company. What media do you think they should have chosen. Board game?

    You're comparing two different levels here, in my opinion. Yes, Mass Effect, yes, Heavy Rain - outstanding games, but much more money, time and resources. Or am I wrong?



    This is the point. It's not a game, it's just a giant cutscene, that is ocasionally interrupted by point&click/WASD movement, fight scenes, buttonmashing, some ridiculously easy to solve puzzles and some dialogue choices that put the illusion of choice in your mind. It could as well have been a novel, comic or a movie since my choices have absolutely 0 impact on the story whatsoever. It's a great story, don't get me wrong, but I expected more from a video game where my choices are supposed to tailor my gaming experience. I think a company in 2012 should be able to do better than that.

  • @shedim said: This is the point. It's not a game, it's just a giant cutscene, that is ocasionally interrupted by point&click/WASD movement, fight scenes, buttonmashing, some ridiculously easy to solve puzzles and some dialogue choices that put the illusion of choice in your mind. It could as well have been a novel, comic or a movie since my choices have absolutely 0 impact on the story whatsoever. It's a great story, don't get me wrong, but I expected more from a video game where my choices are supposed to tailor my gaming experience. I think a company in 2012 should be able to do better than that.



    I understand, but I think the designers decided to tailor the story more on the emotional level. The choices you made may not have affected the whole plot, but the relationships within, don't you think? What would have happened, if they would've added different endings to the story? Or what if Heavy Rain wouldnt have had those. After all, the ending in Heavy Rain depended on the last chapter of the game. (Correct me, if I'm wrong. It's been a while.)

    It's difficult to compare a 'full-format' game to a episodic game, I think. I am just saying, there had to be a reason for a non multiple ending solution. I mean, there is even a second season coming, so who knows?

    But not everyone can always be satisfied, so I respect your opinion!

  • No, not in the slightest. It fell for the same illusions that other games do. There is no real choice. Even Bioware games, which have some beautiful story telling. Are victim to this. Regardless of what you pick, many of the events end up the same.

    Want to run off with Lilly?
    Okay, but you can't

    Don't want to kill Larry?
    Okay, but he still dies

    Many of the choices we make have little outcome because the result is the same. I understand that If you could run off with Lilly that would be almost an entire game they would have to create just from that single choice. So I get the technical reasons why these limitations are in place. But I don't consider anything I saw here revolutionary.

    I still enjoyed it though.

  • @interitus said: No, not in the slightest. It fell for the same illusions that other games do. There is no real choice. Even Bioware games, which have some beautiful story telling. Are victim to this. Regardless of what you pick, many of the events end up the same.

    Want to run off with Lilly?
    Okay, but you can't

    Don't want to kill Larry?
    Okay, but he still dies

    Many of the choices we make have little outcome because the result is the same. I understand that If you could run off with Lilly that would be almost an entire game they would have to create just from that single choice. So I get the technical reasons why these limitations are in place. But I don't consider anything I saw here revolutionary.

    I still enjoyed it though.



    Why are we nit picking the choice elements? I'm talking purely about the narrative and character development + writing aspect.

    The whole choices scenario probably revolved more around telltale being a small budget studio.

    Some of you comparing it to heavy rain who had a 50+ million budget, and the good tidings of sony pushing how ever much money david cage wanted, while the walking dead had half of that.

    For a small studio, like telltale, who was..well let's be honest a company that was making extremely medicore games..to make something like the walking dead..with this level of narrative..while big budget studios who have 60-70, 80 million budgets can't EVEN COMPARE to the narratives that telltale wove. That's whats so amazing...and the level of the narrative and writing as well.

    The choices is a gameplay mechanic,.

  • @ieatbrains said: Nope!



    such well thought out reasoning.

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