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The story is tailored by your choice

posted by falcon168 on - last edited - Viewed by 1.2K users

Whoa! Now I can really see how much the story is tailored by my choices! Thanks TT! You've made a good job!

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  • @Evinshir said:

    The thing is, the story isn't tailored. Not really. Your decisions don't actually change anything. You don't change character's motivations, the tone of the story doesn't change to fit the Lee that you play.

    The thing is, you're putting to much of your own definition of what it should be, rather than accepting what it is.

    If TTG had said that the game alters and you take different paths to an ending based on your actions... you might have a point.

    But they didn't.

    Let's look at "The story is tailored by your choice" literally.

    The story is what happened to Lee and Clem through five episodes. That's the story TTG gave us.

    "Tailored by your choices" - you have choices that alter events in game. Conversations, how people react to you, who has your back and who doesn't, and even who lives and who dies at key times. Those are things you control that alter how the story is presented.

    That's all they ever offered. People are just trying to find hidden meanings that aren't there.

  • Well this is your view. Of course there are other views as you can see here. But for me it isn't the definition of tailored that is the problem.

    It wouldn't have costed nothing to have some characters say goodbye in episode 5 instead of killing them if you made the right/wrong choices beforehand. Instead they just killed off all characters that "had to die" so in season 2 every player of season 1 had exactly the same backstory. Well this makes sense if the walking dead is a movie or a comic, but in a game like the walking dead I expect that my choices do somehow influence what happens to my group at least as well as choices others in the group make. Now choices others in the group made decided over life and death of others and it mattered (kenny sacrificing himself, ben ****ing up killing others, clementine saving molly etc etc) and nothing we do and decide ever has that impact (other than game over or the character dieing shortly afterwards). And that feels bitter. I would like to see the game changed if I sacrifice a lot for the group and I would like to have it turn out differently as if I played a sociopath.
    I enjoyed the game, but this really hurts replayability and to take that control away from the player seems like a strange thing to do.

  • Which brings us back to my original point - people are applying their own meaning to the phrase and then getting mad that it doesn't follow their own expectation of it.

  • All I hear from the people that are disgruntled about "tailored experience" is:

    "Oedipus didn't have any choices! Story sucks!"

  • You know, if they didn't even give us choices, we wouldn't even be having these conversations about the choices we make. Just be glad we even get a chance to "tailor" our experience.

  • Well, some people just aren't happy with what they have - they feel they need more.

    Never understood it.

  • @JabbaDaHuttX7 said: No, people have different expectations as to its meaning. We know what it means, we just don't agree with it. It's relative.

    And not really relevant.

    To use a crude example, if a person goes into a FPS expecting RPG gameplay, they're only going to be disappointed.

    Being unhappy with a game is fine, everyone has their own likes -- but being unhappy because it didn't play the way you thought it should is a bit silly.

  • @DreadMagus said: Which brings us back to my original point - people are applying their own meaning to the phrase and then getting mad that it doesn't follow their own expectation of it.

    This, Telltale themselves were always very clear on what 'tailored' means according to them in all interviews and Playing Dead videos. They already said during the panel with the writers that the season's ending was decided before anything else. This means your choices can't have a huge impact on this.
    They also said multiple times that they put extra effort into making sure no one choice felt "better" than the other. Heck, they admitted they decided not to create a real Lee-Carley romance because than the choice between Carley and Doug in Ep 1 would feel that Carley is always the better option.

    This, to me at least, made it clear that choice in this game results in different things than it does in other games (like the famous series from Bioware where choice is an important aspect). Instead of defining the people around you, your choices actually define yourself more. And this is sometimes put directly into play by confronting you with Clementine and how she feels about what you did. Basicly: Instead of showing you what would happen if, in a hypothetical situation, you'd do this or that.. they basicly put a mirror in front of you for every choice you have to make.

    And this shows because many, many fans feel a very strong connection to their 'first save' Lee. The one that acts like they would in this situation. And more people seem to have it than those who have a really strong connection to their first Shepard.

    And that, to me, is very good storytelling in an interactive medium.

  • @DreadMagus said: And not really relevant.

    To use a crude example, if a person goes into a FPS expecting RPG gameplay, they're only going to be disappointed.

    Being unhappy with a game is fine, everyone has their own likes -- but being unhappy because it didn't play the way you thought it should is a bit silly.

    You seem to be misunderstanding the complaint here. The complaint isn't that we think the game should be played a certain way, but that Telltale gives you the illusion that it will.

    Really, the word "tailored" in regards to how the game works based on how you play was a poor word to use. It conveys a feeling that the game is custom-made: based on the decisions you make. The fact that there are statistics at the end of every mission saying how the decisions you make matter is what really homes in that "feeling".

    Honestly, I stopped believing this game would be anything but an "on-the-rails" adventure after episode 3. (Coincidentally this is when they started to clarify "tailored" in videos and such.) I started to think of it as an interactive movie. (Honestly, this is what the game boils down to. An interactive movie where you can tell the game how you'd feel in your current situation.)

    Episode 3 is where crap hits the fan in terms of the whole tailored feeling going out the window. Doug/Carley die at the exact same moment in the exact same way and Lilly shoots them no matter how you feel about her or interacted with her. Then the Christa/Omir choice comes up and nothing ever becomes of who you save. The other one is saved anyway and it's never mentioned again, as far as I remember.

    Episode 4 also has no important choices in the end. Clementine coming or staying at the house doesn't affect anything but the ability to let Molly get injured. (And she still leaves regardless of what happens.) No matter how much of a jerk you are to Vernon or how nice you are, he'll still steal your stuff in Episode 5. And the decision at the end, something that a lot of people claimed is what made it all matter, also didn't mean squat.

    Episode 5: The decision at the end of episode 4 matters for all of 2 minutes. You meet up with all your group at the end. Did you save Ben in episode 4? Well, big surprise, he dies with Kenny! (Who also dies the exact same way regardless of if you saved him or not.) Did you lop your arm off? You still die! How does the stranger treat you? Hey, whatever you said or did throughout the game he still wants to kill you!

    The Walking Dead is an interactive movie but claims it is something more. That's what ticked me off when I reached the end of Episode 3. I had assumed that my decisions mattered in the LONG RUN not just in the short term.

    What does it matter that party members treat me slightly differently, or even remember what I did in the past, if it changes nothing?

    Maybe it's just the language and the use of the word "tailored" at the beginning of every episode, maybe it's just the decision meters that pop up in the end, but I can assure you what ticked most people off was the game tried to tell you it was something more than it is. Frankly, a lot of the important decisions and how they do nothing and how they lack any impact feels like lazy writing. It's a good story, but I only wished I had influenced it.

  • I can see y'all's points... and yes, I do agree "tailored" isn't the best word.

    To be honest, I only threw my iron in the fire because some people felt "tailored" meant wildly divergent paths and multiple endings or some such - which never seemed to the be what TTG had offered.

    Though, I have to admit, after episode one (Carley/Doug) I did expect a bit more.... options in gameplay.

    While I won't say I'm disappointed that it didn't continue that way through 2-5 - I do see it as a missed opportunity.

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