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Is this racist?

posted by Doctanian on - last edited - Viewed by 1.5K users

Is it racist to wish that the season 2 protagonist will be another minority?

I mean, with Lee, the game broke so many unfortunate traditions in gaming. And with the Walking Dead in general. After that travesty that was T-Dog's character, I was glad to have Lee. But now that he's gone, I fear TellTale will go the typical cut and paste brown-haired white male route.

I know it shouldn't matter, but on a certain level, it does. Especially when it comes to video games and the representation of diversity. I mean, majority of video game protagonists look like this:

video-game-protagonists-kids-love-brown-

We have enough Nathan Drakes. Your thoughts?

118 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Eric Northman said: ... I'm wondering how you would see it if wrote a post hoping that the next protagonist was white, and saying we'd had enough of Lee's kind of character.

    It's really, really, really not the same thing.

    White people are in a position of great privilege in the Western world. That's just how it works. There are a hundred games with white people for every game with a non-white person as hero.

    I remember one anecdote someone related to me about the production of Mirror's Edge, where the developers received feedback from market-testing that essentially boiled down to two things they wanted altered re: the lead character's design.

    A) Bigger breasts.

    B) Less Asian.

    This is why people claiming colour blindness is problematic; because you are essentially ignoring a very real problem. It won't get solved until people acknowledge the problem is there and actually put pressure on companies to change.

  • @DreadMagus said: Race/culture are important, but shouldn't be chosen just to choose them.

    Take Prototype - they had a white lead in the first game and a black lead in the second. When asked "why did you choose a black male for a main character." they replied "We didn't, we chose James Heller." (i.e. one character they had crafted from a pool of potential lead characters - he was just the best one they had crafted)

    Yeah, I called bullshit on that. We should've just stayed the main character from the first one. And it has to make sense in context, I mean, a Japanese RPG set in Edo-era Japan wouldn't make much sense with a brother running around, lol.

  • Position of great privilege?

    I must live in a different "western" world..... oh wait, you mean that 1% with a silver spoon coming out of their ass.

  • @Doctanian said: Yeah, I called bullshit on that. We should've just stayed the main character from the first one. And it has to make sense in context, I mean, a Japanese RPG set in Edo-era Japan wouldn't make much sense with a brother running around, lol.

    Oh goodness, how could you like that emo punk that was Mercer? :p

    "I got me some super powers! And now I must bitch about it! whaaaaaaaaaa!!" :p

    Heller was cool, he had fun with his new toys. :D

  • @Doctanian said: I know, but other than emails, a few missions revolving around the his past, and the occasional Serbian phrase, Niko doesn't expel much of his culture, instead the player adopts the American culture in Liberty City. From the clothes, to the cars, women, TV, food, radio, nightlife, etc, etc. His Eastern European roots are tossed out the window for the most part. There's really no hard time transitioning, at least, none we see on camera.

    So, basically, even if Niko was an average American character coming to Liberty City from San Andreas, the experience would be pretty much the same.


    I do have to totally disagree on this. Over here in Europe we are really mixed, which is a good thing in my opinion, but still, changing style of clothes, cars, blabla, doesn't change your culture. For me playing a Serbian character is a totally different feeling than playing a German, British, French, or even a North American one.

    It is a totally different way of thinking, and that's not meant in a bad way, but it is a fact. These countries have totally different ways of thinking.

  • @JByrne said: It's really, really, really not the same thing.

    White people are in a position of great privilege in the Western world. That's just how it works. There are a hundred games with white people for every game with a non-white person as hero.

    I remember one anecdote someone related to me about the production of Mirror's Edge, where the developers received feedback from market-testing that essentially boiled down to two things they wanted altered re: the lead character's design.

    A) Bigger breasts.

    B) Less Asian.

    This is why people claiming colour blindness is problematic; because you are essentially ignoring a very real problem. It won't get solved until people acknowledge the problem is there and actually put pressure on companies to change.

    Exactly. Dude, you're hitting the nail on the head with these things.

    Lol, the funny thing is, the Asian version made bigger breasts in the artwork.
    two_faiths.jpg

  • @JByrne said: It's really, really, really not the same thing.

    White people are in a position of great privilege in the Western world. That's just how it works. There are a hundred games with white people for every game with a non-white person as hero.

    I remember one anecdote someone related to me about the production of Mirror's Edge, where the developers received feedback from market-testing that essentially boiled down to two things they wanted altered re: the lead character's design.

    A) Bigger breasts.

    B) Less Asian.

    This is why people claiming colour blindness is problematic; because you are essentially ignoring a very real problem. It won't get solved until people acknowledge the problem is there and actually put pressure on companies to change.

    Hate to drag the economy into this, but what is this "very real problem" you speak of? That companies follow what their consumers tell them to do? How is this the fault of the company? If market testing had revealed "smaller breasts" and "more asian", the company would have heeded. This is simple economics.

  • If they make him white - Fans: "Come on! The guy should be black again!"

    If they make him black - Fans: "What the heck? Why are you making all of them black?"

  • I didn't notice Lee was black until it showed pictures of his family.

    I just at first thought he was racially ambiguous for some reason. Not sure why Lee is so lightskinned but the rest of his family is darker.

  • @JByrne said: It's really, really, really not the same thing.

    White people are in a position of great privilege in the Western world. That's just how it works. There are a hundred games with white people for every game with a non-white person as hero.

    I remember one anecdote someone related to me about the production of Mirror's Edge, where the developers received feedback from market-testing that essentially boiled down to two things they wanted altered re: the lead character's design.

    A) Bigger breasts.

    B) Less Asian.

    This is why people claiming colour blindness is problematic; because you are essentially ignoring a very real problem. It won't get solved until people acknowledge the problem is there and actually put pressure on companies to change.

    I'm with everybody else asking, what privilege? And maybe people here do need to think wider than the USA, because I don't know anybody that cares about race here.

    However, women all over the world are still fighting for equal rights to men, even in developed countries.

    Way I see it, maybe non-white people feel race is an issue, same as how I'm more concerned about female representation.

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