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The story is tailored by your choice

posted by falcon168 on - last edited - Viewed by 608 users

Whoa! Now I can really see how much the story is tailored by my choices! Thanks TT! You've made a good job!

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  • @DreadMagus said: Which brings us back to my original point - people are applying their own meaning to the phrase and then getting mad that it doesn't follow their own expectation of it.



    No, people have different expectations as to its meaning. We know what it means, we just don't agree with it. It's relative.

  • Well, some people just aren't happy with what they have - they feel they need more.

    Never understood it.

  • @JabbaDaHuttX7 said: No, people have different expectations as to its meaning. We know what it means, we just don't agree with it. It's relative.



    And not really relevant.

    To use a crude example, if a person goes into a FPS expecting RPG gameplay, they're only going to be disappointed.

    Being unhappy with a game is fine, everyone has their own likes -- but being unhappy because it didn't play the way you thought it should is a bit silly.

  • @DreadMagus said: Which brings us back to my original point - people are applying their own meaning to the phrase and then getting mad that it doesn't follow their own expectation of it.



    This, Telltale themselves were always very clear on what 'tailored' means according to them in all interviews and Playing Dead videos. They already said during the panel with the writers that the season's ending was decided before anything else. This means your choices can't have a huge impact on this.
    They also said multiple times that they put extra effort into making sure no one choice felt "better" than the other. Heck, they admitted they decided not to create a real Lee-Carley romance because than the choice between Carley and Doug in Ep 1 would feel that Carley is always the better option.

    This, to me at least, made it clear that choice in this game results in different things than it does in other games (like the famous series from Bioware where choice is an important aspect). Instead of defining the people around you, your choices actually define yourself more. And this is sometimes put directly into play by confronting you with Clementine and how she feels about what you did. Basicly: Instead of showing you what would happen if, in a hypothetical situation, you'd do this or that.. they basicly put a mirror in front of you for every choice you have to make.

    And this shows because many, many fans feel a very strong connection to their 'first save' Lee. The one that acts like they would in this situation. And more people seem to have it than those who have a really strong connection to their first Shepard.

    And that, to me, is very good storytelling in an interactive medium.

  • @DreadMagus said: And not really relevant.

    To use a crude example, if a person goes into a FPS expecting RPG gameplay, they're only going to be disappointed.

    Being unhappy with a game is fine, everyone has their own likes -- but being unhappy because it didn't play the way you thought it should is a bit silly.



    You seem to be misunderstanding the complaint here. The complaint isn't that we think the game should be played a certain way, but that Telltale gives you the illusion that it will.

    Really, the word "tailored" in regards to how the game works based on how you play was a poor word to use. It conveys a feeling that the game is custom-made: based on the decisions you make. The fact that there are statistics at the end of every mission saying how the decisions you make matter is what really homes in that "feeling".

    Honestly, I stopped believing this game would be anything but an "on-the-rails" adventure after episode 3. (Coincidentally this is when they started to clarify "tailored" in videos and such.) I started to think of it as an interactive movie. (Honestly, this is what the game boils down to. An interactive movie where you can tell the game how you'd feel in your current situation.)

    Episode 3 is where crap hits the fan in terms of the whole tailored feeling going out the window. Doug/Carley die at the exact same moment in the exact same way and Lilly shoots them no matter how you feel about her or interacted with her. Then the Christa/Omir choice comes up and nothing ever becomes of who you save. The other one is saved anyway and it's never mentioned again, as far as I remember.

    Episode 4 also has no important choices in the end. Clementine coming or staying at the house doesn't affect anything but the ability to let Molly get injured. (And she still leaves regardless of what happens.) No matter how much of a jerk you are to Vernon or how nice you are, he'll still steal your stuff in Episode 5. And the decision at the end, something that a lot of people claimed is what made it all matter, also didn't mean squat.

    Episode 5: The decision at the end of episode 4 matters for all of 2 minutes. You meet up with all your group at the end. Did you save Ben in episode 4? Well, big surprise, he dies with Kenny! (Who also dies the exact same way regardless of if you saved him or not.) Did you lop your arm off? You still die! How does the stranger treat you? Hey, whatever you said or did throughout the game he still wants to kill you!

    The Walking Dead is an interactive movie but claims it is something more. That's what ticked me off when I reached the end of Episode 3. I had assumed that my decisions mattered in the LONG RUN not just in the short term.

    What does it matter that party members treat me slightly differently, or even remember what I did in the past, if it changes nothing?

    Maybe it's just the language and the use of the word "tailored" at the beginning of every episode, maybe it's just the decision meters that pop up in the end, but I can assure you what ticked most people off was the game tried to tell you it was something more than it is. Frankly, a lot of the important decisions and how they do nothing and how they lack any impact feels like lazy writing. It's a good story, but I only wished I had influenced it.

  • @DreadMagus said: And not really relevant.

    To use a crude example, if a person goes into a FPS expecting RPG gameplay, they're only going to be disappointed.

    Being unhappy with a game is fine, everyone has their own likes -- but being unhappy because it didn't play the way you thought it should is a bit silly.



    I disagree. If complaints get discounted every time just because the developer claims he intended for something to work a certain way or he never promised X then most games may as well be called perfect unless the developer will freely admit to his own mistakes.

    If I think that the game relies mostly on choices and story I will think about how these elements hold up when compared to other games. You make choices all the time in TWD. It's a major part of the game, and the most valuable gameplay element the game is built on. Not the puzzles (which are easy, and there to advance the plot) or the QTE (which are there to advance the plot). I click on conversation options over 50% of the time.

    That's how I see it, at least.

  • I can see y'all's points... and yes, I do agree "tailored" isn't the best word.

    To be honest, I only threw my iron in the fire because some people felt "tailored" meant wildly divergent paths and multiple endings or some such - which never seemed to the be what TTG had offered.

    Though, I have to admit, after episode one (Carley/Doug) I did expect a bit more.... options in gameplay.

    While I won't say I'm disappointed that it didn't continue that way through 2-5 - I do see it as a missed opportunity.

  • It's annoying how every discussion about the choices soon revolves around the different interpretations of "tailored experience". For me, it's not the word "tailored" that lead to my disappointment. From the Steam store page:

    "A tailored game experience – Live with the profound and lasting consequences of the decisions that you make in each episode. Your actions and choices will affect how your story plays out across the entire series."

  • Same here.

    It's just that having no impact on anything that is at least a little bit important in the story no matter how you play is something frustrating if you play a computergame. I personally also wouldn't mind if one choice would be better than another if you don't know that when you decide. For example I suspected at the end of episode 4 that some people you take with you may die if they are with you. So there is the impression that taking as many people as possible into a fight is the best option, on the other hand it is still stupid to take Ben with you to a stressful situation, because he can clearly not handle it. So I wouldn't have minded if he only was killed if you took him with you for example.

    Of course then some people would replay the game to make different choices and see how they turn out and maybe they want to get the best out of the story. But then at least someone would be motivated to play the game again or play them instead of watching youtube and then be done with it, because nothing you would have done would have changed it.

    I think that is something that should be adressed in season 2. It is a game and not a comic or movie. There has to be some flexibility in the outcome if you make a game even if there is only one ending (like other characters surviving or dieing because of your decisions, situations changing depending on how you handled people, etc). I don't really care if those decisions mostly would affect loose ends that will never be taken up again, it still would make me feel better because you never know when loose ends come back to the story.

  • @falcon168 said: Whoa! Now I can really see how much the story is tailored by my choices! Thanks TT! You've made a good job!



    YES That was good.I always read the books that you decide but this a video game...Awesome.THANKS

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