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Episode 5 Disappointment (vent here) **SPOILERS**

posted by MaroubraDave on - last edited - Viewed by 5.7K users

Telltale,
Firstly i would like to say great game and a fantastic concept. However the ending i would say is not so great. While it is very well made and certainly tugs at your heart strings, I didn't play the game and wait for the ending only to find out i die anyway... Now i know people may argue that you didn't see lee actually turn so maybe he will be ok, but the fact you left it this way is really a let down to the series. I was really looking forward to the last episode but in all honesty it just brought me down and i kinda wish i stopped playing at episode 4. :confused: There should be an alternative ending where you can at least live... Just my opinion.

407 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Hazevamp said: They claimed that the story adapts and is tailored to how you play. Not the experience is tailored to how you play. There is a difference between experience and story. It was a point and click adventure game but with dialogue options. I'm sure everyone started this game believing that the actual story changed based on their choices. Most of the people defending Telltale just don't want to admit it.

    i would have liked my definition of story and telltales definition to match, i but i don't think it would be lying to say that having your bro kenny by your side and that bitch lilly ruining everything is a different story to that poor lilly who lost her father and snapped in an extremely difficult time because of that bastard Kenny and that traitor ben.

    that isn't even everything and they are two different stories, maybe the beginning and the end are identical but the middle is different

  • @Hazevamp said: I'm sure everyone started this game believing that the actual story changed based on their choices. Most of the people defending Telltale just don't want to admit it.

    I didn't believe that when I started the game, and -- as I've said several times throughout this forum -- there is nothing in Telltale's marketing language to indicate that the story dramatically changes based on your decisions. If they DID say that at one point, feel free to post a link, but right now you're basing your interpretation of the game on your interpretation of a single line of marketing copy.

    I felt like the game was a highly personal, personalized experience. If you didn't, that sucks and that's fine, but claiming that the people "defending" Telltale "don't want to admit" anything is just your opinion.

  • @lucidity02 said: I didn't believe that when I started the game, and -- as I've said several times throughout this forum -- there is nothing in Telltale's marketing language to indicate that the story dramatically changes based on your decisions. If they DID say that at one point, feel free to post a link, but right now you're basing your interpretation of the game on your interpretation of a single line of marketing copy.

    I felt like the game was a highly personal, personalized experience. If you didn't, that sucks and that's fine, but claiming that the people "defending" Telltale "don't want to admit" anything is just your opinion.

    Very well said. Probably the best "counterpoint" to that line of thought I've read in a while.

  • If you go on the main page and watch the choice matters trailer i could see where one would believe that choices have a big impact

  • If Lee had to die, I really wanted to see Clem meet up with Christa and Omid before the game ended.

    Not really a disappointment, but I was fully expecting one of the final game situations to be the boat issue, where we would have to choose who gets left behind (and you could choose yourself), since it was mentioned quite a few times by Kenny. I thought for sure that would be a scenario, but before you know it, everyone starts dying.

  • @CrazyandProud said:
    I hate it when people think that the only way that a game can have change in a story is if it branches out or if the game has multiple endings. The changes in this game are how people interact with you. One person can have Kenny be your friend while another can have him as someone who hates you. It changes the experience of the story.

    So you're basically saying that developers should completely ignore the unique and immense possibilities that digital media have to offer and shape their stories just like the non-interactive rollercoaster ride that is a novel or a comic, rather than putting some effort into their product in order to make it a truly unique experience, where the story can branch out and is truly shaped by the player's decisions?

    And no, slightly different dialogues do not match my definition of "A tailored game experience – Live with the profound and lasting consequences of the decisions that you make in each episode." or "Your actions and choices will affect how your story plays out across the entire series."

    There is not a single choice in this game that has any impact whatsoever on the story.

  • @shedim said: So you're basically saying that developers should completely ignore the unique and immense possibilities that digital media have to offer and shape their stories just like the non-interactive rollercoaster ride that is a novel or a comic, rather than putting some effort into their product in order to make it a truly unique experience, where the story can branch out and is truly shaped by the player's decisions?

    And no, slightly different dialogues do not match my definition of "A tailored game experience – Live with the profound and lasting consequences of the decisions that you make in each episode." or "Your actions and choices will affect how your story plays out across the entire series."

    There is not a single choice in this game that has any impact whatsoever on the story.

    They effect the way people interact with you. That effects the way the story is told. It fits the definition just fine. Just because you don't like that kind of change doesn't mean it's not there. They do have an impact on things in the game.

  • @lucidity02 said: I didn't believe that when I started the game, and -- as I've said several times throughout this forum -- there is nothing in Telltale's marketing language to indicate that the story dramatically changes based on your decisions. If they DID say that at one point, feel free to post a link, but right now you're basing your interpretation of the game on your interpretation of a single line of marketing copy.

    I felt like the game was a highly personal, personalized experience. If you didn't, that sucks and that's fine, but claiming that the people "defending" Telltale "don't want to admit" anything is just your opinion.

    No its a fact and yes they did mislead everyone with their wording. No one said the story had to "dramatically" change not even Mass Effect's story dramatically changed but the changes were at least there whereas TWD game was more about the player's emotional experience based on the dialogue options. Anyone who thinks Telltale games wasn't trying to cash in on the whole Mass Effect deal with that "story tailored" ploy is very naive and I would love to sell you a bridge.:rolleyes:

  • @CrazyandProud said: They effect the way people interact with you. That effects the way the story is told. It fits the definition just fine. Just because you don't like that kind of change doesn't mean it's not there. They do have an impact on things in the game.

    Not really, most characters pretty much say the same lines to you no matter what. Which honestly makes no sense for the situation. Others will speak slightly different lines. Once again, how does the change in dialogue change the story? If you look at the story alone, it is pretty much a linear set in stone story no matter what you choose.

  • @Hazevamp said: No its a fact and yes they did mislead everyone with their wording. No one said the story had to "dramatically" change not even Mass Effect's story dramatically changed but the changes were at least there whereas TWD game was more about the player's emotional experience based on the dialogue options. Anyone who thinks Telltale games wasn't trying to cash in on the whole Mass Effect deal with that "story tailored" ploy is very naive and I would love to sell you a bridge.:rolleyes:

    i'm glad i didn't get exactly what i expected when i bought it, but as i have said i would still like a game that is essentially like 5 TWD season 1's in one game and i think season 2 will be an improvement on season 1 (hard to beat) and have more variety.

    @Hazevamp said: Not really, most characters pretty much say the same lines to you no matter what. Which honestly makes no sense for the situation. Others will speak slightly different lines. Once again, how does the change in dialogue change the story? If you look at the story alone, it is pretty much a linear set in stone story no matter what you choose.

    you have to try and fight your gamer training that makes you ignore dialogue and personal relations in games (because they mostly suck and have no meaning or connection with the game) and treat the dialogue choices like they are as important as a level up screen that is timed and has no respec options or a timed choice of your speciality gun

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