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Symbolism/Literary Devices

posted by Doctanian on - last edited - Viewed by 282 users

This game is pretty well written, and it's filled with literary devices. I made this thread because I wanted the community to help me list them all.

You know, things like Foreshadowing, Irony, Red herrings, things like that.

For example:

When you go to Clementine's house, you have to slay her babysitter, Sandra, only to assume that title yourself. That's pretty fucking symbolic.


Any other examples?

19 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • It was? The other ones did, too. And duck was dumb as a bag of hammers.

  • @thestalkinghead said: that is a really well made page :D



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  • @Fabrimuch said: I know, I love tvtropes :D

    But it's increibly addictive, so use it carefully :p



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  • Cop: ""People'll just about go mad when they believe their lives are over."
    Mark: "I know Lilly says [Larry] has heart problems but he's all muscle! I wouldn't want to be stuck in a room with him."
    Katjaa: "I love my son more than life itself..."
    Ben (about Crawford): "I have a bad feeling about this..."

    The beginning and ending somewhat rhyme too:

    [LIST]
    [*]Beginning: Lee is handcuffed, Lee frantically tries to escape the clutches of a walker (Sandra), Clementine hands Lee a blunt weapon (a hammer), Lee proceeds to smash the walker's head in with multiple strikes to the head.

    [*]End: Lee is handcuffed, Clementine frantically tries to escape the clutches of a walker (the cop), Lee hands Clementine a blunt weapon (a baseball bat), Clementine proceeds to smash the walker's head in with multiple strikes to the head.
    [/LIST]

  • @Fabrimuch said: I know, I love tvtropes :D

    But it's increibly addictive, so use it carefully :p



    I know right!? I love tvtropes too, and it's addicting as hell! I had forgotten the link, thanks for reminding me of it. Yay or addiction :)

  • The ending really parallels what Lee says is his crime!

    [LIST]
    [*]Lee's behavior had a negative impact on the most important woman in his life.
    [*]In her grief she fled to the arms of another man who promised her (her parents/love).
    [*]Lee arrives unexpectedly to find them together.
    [*]Lee is held accountable for everything wrong he's done, but realizes the other guy is just nuts.
    [*](Clementine/his wife) chooses Lee over the other guy and attacks him.
    [*]A struggle ensues, and either:
    [*] ---Lee chokes the guy to death.
    [*] ---(Clementine/his wife) kills the guy.
    [*]Lee covers her in (shame/walker guts).
    [*]Then Lee and her take a long march among (walkers/lawyers ;) ).
    [*](Not sure what her parents symbolize)
    [*]Now Lee is imprisoned, and while she can't help him escape she comforts him.
    [*]Lee helps her escape and wishes her the best.
    [*]Then she either:
    [*] ---Lingers on him as long as she can, but they can never be together.
    [*] ---Breaks it off entirely.
    [/LIST]

  • If you get a chance to talk to Ben when the train stops at the bridge in Episode 3, he'll say something this:

    "If I'm ever surrounded, and I know there's no way out, I'll probably just punch my own ticket..."

    "Punch your own ticket?"

    "You know, take myself out..."

    ".......Don't be dramatic!"


    To me that a foreshadowing of the Crawford Bell Tower scene.

  • Ben: Worried about screwing up and getting people killed.....

    Do I have to explain this one? :p

  • "Chekhov's gun is a metaphor for a dramatic principle concerning simplicity and foreshadowing. It suggests that if one shows a loaded gun on stage in the first act of a play, it should be fired in a later act; otherwise, the gun should not be shown in the first place. The principle was articulated by Russian playwright Anton Chekhov and reported in various forms."

    There are a lot of times this kind of thing is used in TWD. The problem is once you recognise foreshadowing, it somewhat ruins the plot. Case in point

    "If I hadn't helped you'd be I'd probably be food by now"
    Mark

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