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Who's Death was the most Unrealistic?

posted by HiggsBoson2142 on - last edited - Viewed by 766 users

As much as I think Kenny would've just shot Ben and ran away in that alleyway, I think Ben's death in No Time Left was the most unrealistic. I don't get how a sturdy metal balcony can just suddenly "fall". It doesn't make sense. Not to me.

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  • [QUOTE=RobtMyers;756795]This is a case of suspension of disbelief. Lee was distraught about Clem disappearing (remember how she went missing earlier in the episode?), finding her hat and then her freakin' walkie talkie in the middle of the road. I was distraught too, but checked the garbage pile first (since it was clickable) yet I was still "overconfident" in what the game was willing to do to Lee.

    If you tell me that even with all the rules for handling dangerous animals that experienced people don't still get killed, well just remember the Crocodile Hunter.[/QUOT I have no real problem with the deaths or how they were portrayed, my real WTF moment was, if it was preordained that Lee was going to be bit why did they give you the option of checking the trash at all? If being cautious ended up with the same results as being rash why bother with a choice?

  • @ColtPeacemaker00 said: I have no real problem with the deaths or how they were portrayed, my real WTF moment was, if it was preordained that Lee was going to be bit why did they give you the option of checking the trash at all? If being cautious ended up with the same results as being rash why bother with a choice?

    Maybe checking the garbage pile meant seeing if Clem was lying under there dead or hiding, since her walkie talkie is right next to it and her hat is nearby.

  • @marioluigi344 said: Obviously he WANTED to die, but that completely defies what he said earlier.


    Because people who want to die would totally announce it everywhere they go...

  • @Ygdrasel said: Because people who want to die would totally announce it everywhere they go...

    Agreed. I think what Kenny says earlier doesn't directly go against his actions.. Fighting walkers until they overwhelm you and eat you is different than shooting yourself in the head. His speech was about not giving up no matter how hard it is. So him fighting the horde of walkers to try to help the people he cares about, no matter how difficult or dangerous it was, is what he did.

    Maybe he didn't specifically want to die, but didn't care if he survived or not, as long as he helped his friends.

  • @Mornai said: Agreed. I think what Kenny says earlier doesn't directly go against his actions.. Fighting walkers until they overwhelm you and eat you is different than shooting yourself in the head. His speech was about not giving up no matter how hard it is. So him fighting the horde of walkers to try to help the people he cares about, no matter how difficult or dangerous it was, is what he did.

    Maybe he didn't specifically want to die, but didn't care if he survived or not, as long as he helped his friends.

    Basically a suicide but he put up a fight first. So it wasn't technically just giving up...

    It's like a hopeless criminal commiting suicide-by-cop: It's not technically suicide but you know damn well the police are about to fill you with bullets.

  • @Mornai said: Agreed. I think what Kenny says earlier doesn't directly go against his actions.. Fighting walkers until they overwhelm you and eat you is different than shooting yourself in the head. His speech was about not giving up no matter how hard it is. So him fighting the horde of walkers to try to help the people he cares about, no matter how difficult or dangerous it was, is what he did.

    Maybe he didn't specifically want to die, but didn't care if he survived or not, as long as he helped his friends.

    Him trying to fight off the walkers was pointless and wasn't helping anyone he cared about. In fact it hurt the people who cared about him. The Ben scene at least. Haven't played the other one.

  • @ColtPeacemaker00 said: I have no real problem with the deaths or how they were portrayed, my real WTF moment was, if it was preordained that Lee was going to be bit why did they give you the option of checking the trash at all? If being cautious ended up with the same results as being rash why bother with a choice?

    Story telling, or put another way, Telling a Tale with a Game.

    That's the point here, not scoring points, strategizing or looking for the "best" outcome. It's tailoring the events of the core story to your own beliefs and behaviors to draw you in more deeply than a one-size-fits-all narrative ever could.

    Consider: Whether you saved Doug or Carley you know that they are only alive because you sacrificed another character for them. That makes you defensive of them, more strongly attached, committed to wanting the other character's sacrifice to not be in vain. Then when they're shot by Lily the loss hits you all the harder because they were "your" friend. The one you stuck your neck out for. The one that, for whatever reason in that fleeting moment in episode one, you decided you liked better.

    I think what TTG is on the verge of here is knocking down the walls that separate stories and games and fusing them into something that's both and neither. When each choice makes you more deeply invested in characters and subsequent events than you would be if you were reading or watching a story, it could be a new art form.

  • Ducks was sadder. Duck was one of them, part of the group. You got to know him, his death was like losing a family member. He idolized Lee, to the point where Kenny was jealous. He was Robin "for christsakes" to your Batman. The boy in the attic was a stranger, you did not have to witness his death or have no hand in it. In my eyes the fate of the attic boy does not compare with the death of one of your own. I unlike some here have never "cried, wept, grew misty", at any point in this wonderful story, but I was genuinely saddend as I watched Duck die, an emotion I did not feel anywhere close to the extent at the sight of the poor child in the attic.

  • I apologise for the above post, it was meant for a different thread, and don't know how I posted it here. Please ignore it.

  • Either Travis or Ben.
    Travis had time to get up and run from the Walkers, and anyone else could have gone to his rescue, but only yelled for him to watch out.

    As for Ben... Why didn't he realize the balcony was coming loose? If he hadn't seen it, which was possible, wouldn't he realize it when he tried to stand on it? I can imagine it wouldn't have felt firmly in place and would have swayed a bit.

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