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You're f**king kidding me!

posted by tigerwolflover on - last edited - Viewed by 451 users

ok heres the ? did lee really so weak tht he could pick up a gun and shhot himself!?! i mean why tramatize the little girl who is pratically your daughter by making her shoot you. why couldnt he have her leave with the gun the room kill him self with the knife? then she would remember him ALIVE not dead?

p.s. i olny saw one ending so....yeah dont yell at me for saying tht he dosent have her leave the garage

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  • He can't stand up, he can barely move his limbs.. i think he might be a bit weak to do that.

    Plus what Dread said.

  • [quote=k0t0;733260]lee: ..............i'll miss you
    clem: ...how?
    Lee: Oh gtfo clem[/quote]

    lmao

  • @tigerwolflover said: i mean why tramatize the little girl who is pratically your daughter by making her shoot you. why couldnt he have her leave with the gun the room kill him self with the knife? then she would remember him ALIVE not dead?

    p.s. i olny saw one ending so....yeah dont yell at me for saying tht he dosent have her leave the garage


    I think kirkman has put it pretty good, https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=PkeK1suM0DY#t=514s

    I like the idea of forcing Clem to shoot him so it will prepare her for what she is gonna have to do from
    here on out. I think it sounds harsh on the surface, but if you think about it it would be much worse to
    not prepare her for what's coming to preserve her innosence in a world where that is something that can get her killed.

  • @Rommel49 said: That rationale doesn't really make sense though. Simply because Lee wasn't in a position to actually make Clem do anything at the time. She was either willing to shoot Lee or she wasn't; if the former, it's unnecessary, if the latter, it's irrelevant to try and teach her at that point.

    It also doesn't make much practical sense. In any survival scenario, the goal is to mitigate risk and maximize resources. The bullet she uses on Lee is one she doesn't have to deal with an actual threat or to potentially get food. There's also the matter of the herd outside. Live to fight another day and all - every round she expends on non-threats is a chance she won't get that oppurtunity.

    Not to mention you just broke rule #2...no loud sounds to attract zombies unless absolutely necessary.

  • @Rommel49 said: That rationale doesn't really make sense though. Simply because Lee wasn't in a position to actually make Clem do anything at the time. She was either willing to shoot Lee or she wasn't; if the former, it's unnecessary, if the latter, it's irrelevant to try and teach her at that point.

    It also doesn't make much practical sense. In any survival scenario, the goal is to mitigate risk and maximize resources. The bullet she uses on Lee is one she doesn't have to deal with an actual threat or to potentially get food. There's also the matter of the herd outside. Live to fight another day and all - every round she expends on non-threats is a chance she won't get that oppurtunity.

    We're sentimental creatures. Would have been pragmatic for Kenny to leave Duck as well, but it was never happening. Nobody wants to think of their loved ones as Walkers. A mercy kill is a pretty common reaction.

  • @Rommel49 said: That rationale doesn't really make sense though. Simply because Lee wasn't in a position to actually make Clem do anything at the time. She was either willing to shoot Lee or she wasn't; if the former, it's unnecessary, if the latter, it's irrelevant to try and teach her at that point.

    It also doesn't make much practical sense. In any survival scenario, the goal is to mitigate risk and maximize resources. The bullet she uses on Lee is one she doesn't have to deal with an actual threat or to potentially get food. There's also the matter of the herd outside. Live to fight another day and all - every round she expends on non-threats is a chance she won't get that oppurtunity.

    I'm sorry, I've read this five times - and I still don't see how what your saying applies to this situation. You're trying to apply reason and rationality to an emotional situation. It doesn't stand up.

    Fact 1) Attachment will get you killed in a ZA - where anyone you love can and will try to kill you if they "die"

    Fact 2) Lee's "job" is to train Clem to survive, knowing how to deal with Fact 1 is essential.

    Also - you're overlooking the power of persuasion. Clem didn't want to, obviously, but Lee her mentor and surrogate father made her do it. The same way you make any kid who has an emotional bond do anything they don't want to. Persuasion.

    For someone who claims military experience (iirc) you should know the value of morale. What exactly would it have done emotionally, to Clem, had she left Lee (her parent figure at that point) as a walker?

    Don't overlook the fact she's still a nine year old little girl - 3 months into a ZA or not.

  • I don't think he had a knife on him anymore. Clem needed to take the gun, and watching Lee commit suicide and then making her pry the gun from his hands is even worse in my opinion. Dread has the right idea, and it's the last lesson some of us decided to teach Clem.
    You take care of your own, and don't let your loved ones turn.

  • @DreadMagus said: I'm sorry, I've read this five times - and I still don't see how what your saying applies to this situation. You're trying to apply reason and rationality to an emotional situation. It doesn't stand up.

    Fact 1) Attachment will get you killed in a ZA - where anyone you love can and will try to kill you if they "die"

    Fact 2) Lee's "job" is to train Clem to survive, knowing how to deal with Fact 1 is essential.

    Also - you're overlooking the power of persuasion. Clem didn't want to, obviously, but Lee her mentor and surrogate father made her do it. The same way you make any kid who has an emotional bond do anything they don't want to. Persuasion.

    For someone who claims military experience (iirc) you should know the value of morale. What exactly would it have done emotionally, to Clem, had she left Lee (her parent figure at that point) as a walker?

    Don't overlook the fact she's still a nine year old little girl - 3 months into a ZA or not.

    Fact 1) Clem already fully understands that walkers are dead people, she was able to simply leave her parents in the streets when she brings Lee inside. What does she say on the subject? "They're dead for sure".

    Fact 2) This is partially covered by fact 1. Additionally, thousands of walkers outside + gunshot = bad idea.

    Avoiding a threat entirely is just as good, if not better than dealing with it outright in her case. There's a reason state militaries have been teaching evasion and infiltration of some type for thousands of years.

    Morale's also a pretty weak excuse, her morale's going to be at the bottom of the barrel no matter what she does. The kid understands that damn near everybody she cares about is dead.

  • Gunshot wouldn't have mattered one bit. She already knew how to disguise her scent.... so your point #2 is not relevant.

    As for point #1 - You're missing the point that I originally presented. She needed to know how to deal with a loved one who turned then and there. Let me reiterate that: then and there.

    And Morale is NOT a flimsy excuse - do you really want Clem to become a "mini-Kenny" who was eaten away with guilt over what he "couldn't" do or "should have" done? I thought the goal was to make it so Clem could survive anything - not just assume she could do it.

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