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TT's King's Quest: R.I.P. (aka Really Improbable Project)

posted by Bloody Eugene on - last edited - Viewed by 5.2K users

I've heard that they have problems with the Activision's rights. Any TT official news or reference about the game (aside this forum thread) was deleted. They had a placeholder website similar to the Fable one, and it's not available anymore.
The last statement about it was "The genre doesn't need us anymore".
No official comments on the forum aside Mods, the last one being one year old.

So.....
Telltale's King's Quest R.I.P.?
:(

279 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Mmm...yeah. That quote is a big red flag.

    I'm tired of people thinking gameplay and story have to be mutually exclusive. It seems most games either have high emphasis on gameplay and low on story (e.g.: Mario, Doom) or the other way around (Planescape: Torment, Heavy Rain). Ideally, every game would be great when it comes to both story and gameplay, which isn't an impossible task. Deus Ex is a perfect example of this. It's got a creative, fleshed-out setting and a captivating plot, but even without that it's a great mixture of FPS/RPG/stealth gameplay. Or to use an adventure game example, there's The Longest Journey. Great setting, great plot, great characters...and what do you know, great puzzles (except that awful rubber duck one at the beginning :p ).

    If Telltale wants more focus on storytelling, that's great. I'd encourage that, especially since every last one of Telltale's games have been well-written, and that talent should shine all it can. But that doesn't mean getting rid of puzzles. Story and gameplay are not enemies, they're meant to complement each other.

  • @RAnthonyMahan said: Mmm...yeah. That quote is a big red flag.

    I'm tired of people thinking gameplay and story have to be mutually exclusive. It seems most games either have high emphasis on gameplay and low on story (e.g.: Mario, Doom) or the other way around (Planescape: Torment, Heavy Rain). Ideally, every game would be great when it comes to both story and gameplay, which isn't an impossible task. Deus Ex is a perfect example of this. It's got a creative, fleshed-out setting and a captivating plot, but even without that it's a great mixture of FPS/RPG/stealth gameplay. Or to use an adventure game example, there's The Longest Journey. Great setting, great plot, great characters...and what do you know, great puzzles (except that awful rubber duck one at the beginning :p ).

    If Telltale wants more focus on storytelling, that's great. I'd encourage that, especially since every last one of Telltale's games have been well-written, and that talent should shine all it can. But that doesn't mean getting rid of puzzles. Story and gameplay are not enemies, they're meant to complement each other.

    Yes! Very well put. I couldn't agree more.

  • I think any mention of King's Quest by IGN is cause to not entirely count Telltale out yet...

  • I won't disagree, the 'on-rails' approach to story telling can really take you out of the 'game', its more akin to that old ride at epcott center, where people in your cart could all vote on the 'ending' of the ride, and then get the ending. Or if no choice was made, given a random ending.

    It's also very much a revert back to the old "make a choice/choose your own adventure' books which were often said to be the inspiration for early Adventure games and sub-genre 'interactive novellas'(which are super popular in Japan). They have their place in the history of 'adventure gaming' but shouldn't be the only form of 'adventure gaming'.

    Even Roberta Williams in one interview (circa Phantasmagoria just before she started working on KQ8, IIRC) nodded to wanting to moving games in that direction of story telling more organic environmental interactivity. That is as she explained old style adventure-game puzzles were a something she saw as a limitation in the technology, because of limited resources you couldn't do things you might choose to do in a real-life situation. She was hoping to make things more interactive, more of a virtual reality.

    Of course even the way Roberta described it could end up more like an action game (a game like Thief series, or Deus Ex may fit into storytelling more environmental interactivity), than what Telltale has done, which in many ways stifled 'interactivity'. Although it does rely more on environmental interactivity and on the spot choices.

  • IGN only mentioned it because they'd mentioned it in their own article, three years ago.

    They're not doing it. If they were, they'd have done it by now. The IPs they have now are far more interesting and lucrative for them.


    Bt

  • @Blackthorne519 said: IGN only mentioned it because they'd mentioned it in their own article, three years ago.

    They're not doing it. If they were, they'd have done it by now. The IPs they have now are far more interesting and lucrative for them.

    Plus, I doubt the license from Activision hasn't expired by now.

  • Quote:
    David Cage has kind of gone on our path, which is asking ‘where do we take adventure games from here? How do we evolve it and make it more of a storytelling medium and less of a puzzle-based medium?’

    I am so sick and tired of people from Telltale talking about how they are supposedly "evolving" the adventure game genre. What they are doing is nothing new and is NOT even making true adventure games. And who the hell do they think they are with the suggestion that they alone are going to change a genre?

    As I posted before, they are basically making games that rely more on QTE's (Quick Time Events) than on letting the player have more control and freedom to explore the virtual world. What they are doing is closer to interactive movies. This is NOT NEW. Telltale needs to quit acting like they are some great pioneers and innovators, since what they are doing is basically Dragon's Lair with dialogue trees, more story and an easier interface.

    Clip from the QTE-filled, interactive movie and apparent inspiration for Telltale's new game design direction:

    http://youtu.be/P3XNQja0H7I

    Telltale's apparent philosophy is to reject much of what actually makes adventure games adventure games. It is time to stop calling Telltale an adventure game developer. We should call Telltale what they are: an interactive movie factory whose management has explicitly rejected the idea of challenging puzzles and of giving the player the freedom to explore.

  • IGN only mentioned it because they'd mentioned it in their own article, three years ago.

    Actually only two years ago on the 17th of this month. Do you have a problem with simple math?

    It will be three years next february (2014).

  • @Chyron8472 said: Plus, I doubt the license from Activision hasn't expired by now.

    I think Replay Games is going to end up doing a new King's Quest.

    They got Leisure Suit Larry, and I think they will be working with Mark Crowe on a new game in the near future. Based on a recent Josh Mandel comment on Kickstarter, some have speculated that Mark Crowe is doing the Larry Reloaded box cover art and logo, and that Crowe (and Scott Murphy?) will probably have more involvement with Replay in the future.

    I would welcome a KQ from Replay, since at least they love the original series and understand adventure gaming.

  • A new King's Quest? They have said Replay is only interested in making remakes to bring old games to a new audience.

This discussion has been closed.